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06-20

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Expert FAAB Review: Week 12
by
Mike Gianella

06-20

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0

Closer Report: Week 12
by
Matt Collins

06-13

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Closer Report: Week 11
by
Matt Collins

06-06

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Closer Report: Week 10
by
Matt Collins

05-30

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6

Closer Report: Week 9
by
Matt Collins

05-23

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1

Closer Report: Week 8
by
Matt Collins

05-16

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3

Closer Report: Week 7
by
Matt Collins

05-09

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10

Closer Report: Week 6
by
Matt Collins

05-02

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12

Closer Report: Week 5
by
Matt Collins

04-25

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4

Closer Report: Week 4
by
Matt Collins

04-18

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3

Closer Report: Week 3
by
Matt Collins

04-11

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2

Closer Report: Week 2
by
Matt Collins

04-05

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2

Deep League Report: Week 1
by
Scooter Hotz

04-04

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12

Closer Report: Week 1
by
Matt Collins

09-25

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5

Painting the Black: Joe Girardi's Large Adult Bullpen
by
R.J. Anderson

07-28

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1

Transaction Analysis: Mets Clip On a Ty
by
R.J. Anderson and Al Skorupa

07-09

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1

Field Generals: (I Can't Get No) Communication
by
Ian Frazer

04-02

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6

Every Team's Moneyball: Los Angeles Angels: Ask First, Pitch Later
by
Sam Miller

04-03

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 420: Yost, Replay, Porter, and PEDs
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-27

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39

Baseball Therapy: Why Are Smart Teams Spending Money on Relievers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-11

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2

Raising Aces: Set-up the Fall Guy
by
Doug Thorburn

09-11

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12

Pebble Hunting: The A's and Building a Bullpen By Attrition
by
Sam Miller

09-03

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9

Baseball Therapy: Do Young Pitchers Fail to Develop When the Bullpen Implodes?
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-02

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2

BP Unfiltered: Reliever Value at the Deadline
by
Andrew Koo

07-25

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Bullpen Report: On the Grilli
by
Mike Gianella

07-18

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4

Skewed Left: Jason Grilli, Mark Melancon, and the Pirates Approach to Building a Bullen
by
Zachary Levine

06-18

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2

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Yankees' Post-Rivera Relief Corps
by
Josh Norris

05-17

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 205: Catcher Framing Questions/A Hypothetical Pitching Problem/Post-Start MRIs
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-03

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 195: Bad Body Language/Upgrading Bullpens/Steroids and the Children/BABIP and Bad Luck
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-29

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16

Baseball Therapy: On the Evolution of the Patient Hitter
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-08

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7

BP Unfiltered: The Eight-Man Bullpen Comes Back to Bite the Brewers
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-25

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34

Baseball Therapy: Could the All-Bullpen Approach Actually Work?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-22

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48

Overthinking It: Ranking Rivera
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-01

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12

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing the BP Bullpen (Mis)management Tool
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-18

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3

A Little Relief
by
Jonah Birenbaum

11-05

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13

Baseball Therapy: In Praise of the Modern Bullpen
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-15

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 62: Yankees-Tigers ALCS Update/How Hard is Pitching on Short Rest?/October Bullpen Strategy
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-14

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7

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game One Recap: Tigers 6, Yankees 4
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-05

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7

Overthinking It: Baltimore's Best Bet to Beat Texas
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-26

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3

Pebble Hunting: A Closer Look at Relievers and Leverage
by
Sam Miller

09-12

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 40: The Phillies' Return to 500/A Modest Bullpen Proposal
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-29

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29

Overthinking It: What Stephen Strasburg's Season Could Have Looked Like
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-13

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Mets' Bullpen Doesn't Blow It
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-01

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 11: Train Crossing
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-20

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1

The Platoon Advantage: Venting About Bullpen Woes
by
Cee Angi

05-31

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7

On the Beat: Fireballer in the Hole
by
John Perrotto

05-25

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5

Prospectus Game of the Week: Bullpens, Banana Suits, and Ryan Braun
by
Sam Miller

05-16

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12

The Lineup Card: 11 Surprising Early-Season Stats
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-23

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5

What You Need to Know: Monday, April 23
by
Daniel Rathman

04-18

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What You Need to Know: Wednesday, April 18
by
Daniel Rathman

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April 5, 2017 6:00 am

Deep League Report: Week 1

2

Scooter Hotz

Rookie outfielder Jacob May has at least until May to produce for the rebuilding White Sox. Keep an eye on him and these other possible fantasy replacement parts.

Finally. Baseball is back. No need for a lengthy introduction. Let’s get this Deep League Report rolling.

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April 4, 2017 6:00 am

Closer Report: Week 1

12

Matt Collins

It's early, but it's never too early to review the fluid nature of baseball's save men and their potential successors.

Welcome back to another season of the Closer Report. If you’ve been reading here for the past couple of years, you’ll recognize me. This is the third-consecutive season that I’ll be handling this column, which every other writer on staff views as a punishment. Generally, I pick three or four situations a week to take a deep-ish dive on, and three or four more for quick hits. Of course, we’ve only had two days of baseball and not much news has come out just yet. So, instead, I'll focus on 10 situations of interest to start the season, and I’ll take a brief look at each of those today.

Additionally, I have a Closer Grid that I do my best to update relatively quickly. When I make a change, I’ll highlight in yellow. The third column might not seem as much obvious use to fantasy players; rather, it is for relievers that I generally like. Some could close games this year, and some could be of interest to dynasty players who want to keep an eye on young relievers. Mostly, though, it’s just pitchers who I think are fun. Anyway, with all of the housekeeping out of the way, let’s get to the good stuff.

Nationals

My biggest miss of draft season in regard to closer was almost certainly the Nationals situation. All spring, I didn’t understand why Shawn Kelley wasn’t being drafted higher. He’s clearly the best reliever in that bullpen, and Dusty Baker is a fairly traditional manager. Kelley getting the closer gig was a slam dunk in my eyes. Instead, they named Blake Treinen to that role. Now, I’m not cutting Kelley right away, because I think Treinen could have a fairly short leash. He’s a really good reliever, but since it took Baker so long to even name a closer it leads me to believe he also won’t hesitate to make a change. Additionally, Kelley should provide good value with his ratios in the meantime. I wouldn’t say I’m expecting Treinen to lose the job soon, but it’s realistic enough to hang onto Kelley at a time where there’s not much reliever value on the waiver wire.

Rockies

While Kelley was my biggest miss, it wasn’t my only one. I also was banking on Adam Ottavino taking the closer gig in Colorado. I know the Rockies made a fairly high-profile splash in signing Greg Holland, and he’s not that far removed from being one of the premiere relievers in baseball. However, he did miss all of last year, and Ottavino looked outstanding when he returned from his own long-term injury midway through last season. Holland was solid in spring and I think the Rockies will give him a little bit of a longer leash given their commitment to him this winter. I like Ottavino a lot, but I’m more likely to drop him before Kelley (and yes, I do own both in one league). Some of it is because of the leash, but it also is just a product of calling Coors Field home. I suspect that Ottavino will be the closer at some point, but if another closer option emerges early in the year I won’t wait around for the Rockies.

Blue Jays

Right before the season started, the Blue Jays announced that Roberto Osuna would start on the 10-day disabled list. This was surprising, considering that he pitched toward the end of camp. This likely moves Jason Grilli to the top of their depth chart, although he struggled in the opener Monday, and that could open the door for Joe Biagini. Don’t get too excited about either one, though, because Osuna is expected to be back as soon as he’s eligible to return.

Mets

We all knew that Jeurys Familia was going to be suspended to start the season, but we weren’t sure for how long. It came down last week that he’d miss New York's first 15 games, rather than the 30 that some speculated. This is a bit of a hit to those who drafted Addison Reed for a month’s worth of saves. He’ll still help with ratios, but Reed is not nearly as valuable as some were led to believe.

Angels

On Monday, manager Mike Scioscia told the presumed favorite for the Angels closer role, Cam Bedrosian, that they'd be rolling with a committee approach for the ninth inning. This was a bit surprising, considering that Huston Street is hurt and Bedrosian is clearly the best remaining option. One could be tempted to jump after Andrew Bailey on waivers, because he’s the next-most likely to get saves for L.A. I'd hold off, though. Bedrosian is an outstanding pitcher and the Angels recognize that. He’ll get the majority of the chances early on and I suspect he’ll eventually win the job outright. Even if Bedrosian loses the job when Street returns, the latter is always an injury risk. If anything, I’d use this opportunity to buy low on Bedrosian.

Reds

There’s not much good about the Reds heading into the season, but I’m pretty fascinated by the back of their bullpen. Raisel Iglesias is the most popular fantasy target on the staff, and it makes sense. He’s the most talented. However, it wouldn’t surprise me if they decide he’s better off in a multi-inning, Andrew Miller-esque role. The most likely way this happens, in my eyes, is if Michael Lorenzen steps up. I’m not saying I’d add him right now, because there’s not a ton of value just yet. But the upside is there, as he showed last year. If he can up his strikeout rate a bit, I think he could take the closer gig, as guys like Drew Storen and Tony Cingrani fade, and Iglesias moves into a more impactful role. Iglesias is my favorite pitcher on this roster, but by midseason I think Lorenzen will be the best for fantasy purposes.

Athletics

The most mysterious closer situation in baseball is in Oakland. It’s not that they’re officially going with a committee, it’s that they haven’t said anything about the role. Without any information, I’d just assume Ryan Madson still has the job. He took a big step back last year, though, and is entering his age-36 season. I don’t have a ton of trust in him, and believe it’s only a matter of time until Sean Doolittle takes the job. My only concern with Doolittle is that he could be traded if/when Oakland falls out of it again, which means he’d only have a couple of months—tops—to get saves.

Diamondbacks

Fernando Rodney is a popular pick to lose his role first, and for good reason. While he shows flashes of greatness, he’s incredibly erratic. That’s not the best look for a closer. With that being said, the Diamondbacks don’t have anyone who figures to challenge him immediately. Randall Delgado is likely second in the pecking order, and he had a 113 DRA- last year. I, too, believe that Rodney will eventually lose this job, but someone else will have to step up first, and it’s not clear who that’ll be or when they’ll do it.

Cubs

The defending champs have an unambiguous closer situation. The ninth inning belongs to Wade Davis. With that being said, Hector Rondon is my favorite set-up option that no one seems to talk about. He’ll get you strikeouts, keep his WHIP down and his home run issues last year were probably a fluke. At worst, he’s a near-elite non-closer. There also is the injury risk associated with Davis, which would obviously open up a spot for Rondon. I think I’m more wary of Davis than most, but either way Rondon deserves to be treated more like Nate Jones and less like Joaquin Benoit (who immediately follows Rondon in NFBC ADP).

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September 25, 2015 6:00 am

Painting the Black: Joe Girardi's Large Adult Bullpen

5

R.J. Anderson

Brian Cashman has given his skipper a massive bullpen to work with this September; how has Girardi used it?

Around this time last season, the Angels made a group of unremarkable players interesting by bringing them to the majors for the stretch run. Then-GM Jerry Dipoto had spent the year collecting parts that, when assembled with sufficient care and glue, gifted Mike Scioscia a 38- or 39-man roster perfect for excelling at situational baseball. The expected payoff of Dipoto's creation was small, but that was okay: his greatest sacrifice in putting together the Fringe-Voltron was limiting personal space in the dugout.

Though Dipoto is no longer making the moves in Anaheim, the Angels have nonetheless paid homage to their old boss by inviting a glut of players to assist them en route to the finish line. However, a different club—one without Dipoto ties—has since elbowed past the Angels to earn distinction as the team most willing to push roster expansion to its limit. That team is the Yankees, which, in addition to leading the majors in active-roster players (39) and percentage of the 40-man roster that is on the active roster, also lead the majors in roster-related creativity (numbers through September 22nd and courtesy of Roster Resource):

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July 28, 2015 6:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Mets Clip On a Ty

1

R.J. Anderson and Al Skorupa

Tyler Clippard heads back east to solidify the Mets' bullpen for the stretch run



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July 9, 2015 10:45 am

Field Generals: (I Can't Get No) Communication

1

Ian Frazer

On some notable recent bullpen screwups and how they could be prevented.

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The diverse and carefully constructed bullpen of GM and former reliever Jerry Dipoto.

Every day until Opening Day, Baseball Prospectus authors will preview two teams—one from the AL, one from the NL—identifying strategies those teams employ to gain an advantage. Today: two AL teams! Projected division winners Angels and their diverse bullpen of specific pieces, plus the Red Sox and their collection of same-position hitters.

Week 1 previews: Giants | Royals | Dodgers | Rays | Padres | Astros | Rockies | Athletics | Mets | Yankees

Read the full article...

Ben and Sam talk about Ned Yost's tactics, expanded replay's first few days, Bo Porter's bullpen philosophy, and more.

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Et tu, Tampa Bay?

Last week, the Tampa Bay Rays signed Grant Balfour to be their closer for 2014 (and presumably 2015), committing to pay him $12 million over the next two seasons. It’s not an expensive closer contract, as these things go. But for the cost-conscious Rays, it seemed a little strange. The team also re-signed Juan Carlos Oviedo (formerly Leo Nunez) and traded for Heath Bell over the winter. Another sabermetric darling team, the Oakland A’s, signed Eric O’Flaherty last week and, earlier in the winter, traded for Josh Lindblom and Jim Johnson.

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October 11, 2013 10:08 am

Raising Aces: Set-up the Fall Guy

2

Doug Thorburn

A tip of the cap toward the effective set-up men who get little publicity unless they implode.

The role of set-up man is a tough gig. Serving as the bridge to the more famous, better-compensated closer, the set-up man carries all of the risks of a late-inning reliever with virtually none of the accolades. A closer who gets his requisite three outs (or more, as often happens in the postseason) might be credited for “shutting the door” on the opposition, but the eighth-inning guy is rarely mentioned in the aftermath of a victory. The only time the name of a set-up man appears in bold ink is when he gives up runs and incurs the dreaded blown save.

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September 11, 2013 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The A's and Building a Bullpen By Attrition

12

Sam Miller

Why do teams pay for relievers? Because picking them up for nothing is an awful lot of work.

The other day, Ben Lindbergh and I were bantering about relievers who are all of a sudden awesome. Will Smith, Louis Coleman, Neal Cotts, some other guy whose name I have already forgotten. (Ed. note: Kevin Siegrist.) And Ben asked, as somebody always will, why teams still pay for relievers when there seem to be an infinite number of humans capable of pitching like Jonathan Papelbon for a year.

The A’s don’t pay for relievers. Their top seven this year are making about $8 million and cost almost nothing in talent to acquire. The A’s also have the second-best bullpen FRA of the post-expansion era, behind only this year’s Braves. They make it look so easy! But this incredible success is also the answer to Ben’s question. Teams still pay for relievers because the A’s way of doing things takes so much friggin' effort.

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Or, should the Astros invest in some veteran relievers?

Autumn came a little early to Houston this year. You might not have noticed, but the Astros recently became the first American League team to be formally eliminated from the playoffs. It’s not that anyone really expected the Astros to contend this year, but then again, I picked the Angels to win the World Series at the beginning of the year. Shows what we know.

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Do teams tend to overpay for bullpen help at the deadline?

Baseball lore preaches that a team “can never have enough pitching,” but we rarely hear the same thing said about hitting, perhaps because of a sister proverb, “Baseball is 75 percent pitching.” Pitcher fragility plays a big part, of course. But sometimes one poor start or relief outing will cause a team to press for more pitchers: a marginal arm blows up, and suddenly the team needs assistance. When a hitter goes 0-for-4 or 1-for-5, on the other hand, the line is common enough that we don’t bat an eye.

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