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Articles Tagged Bullpen 

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04-25

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4

Closer Report: Week 4
by
Matt Collins

04-18

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3

Closer Report: Week 3
by
Matt Collins

04-11

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2

Closer Report: Week 2
by
Matt Collins

04-05

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2

Deep League Report: Week 1
by
Scooter Hotz

04-04

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12

Closer Report: Week 1
by
Matt Collins

09-25

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5

Painting the Black: Joe Girardi's Large Adult Bullpen
by
R.J. Anderson

07-28

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1

Transaction Analysis: Mets Clip On a Ty
by
R.J. Anderson and Al Skorupa

07-09

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1

Field Generals: (I Can't Get No) Communication
by
Ian Frazer

04-02

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6

Every Team's Moneyball: Los Angeles Angels: Ask First, Pitch Later
by
Sam Miller

04-03

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 420: Yost, Replay, Porter, and PEDs
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-27

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39

Baseball Therapy: Why Are Smart Teams Spending Money on Relievers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-11

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2

Raising Aces: Set-up the Fall Guy
by
Doug Thorburn

09-11

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12

Pebble Hunting: The A's and Building a Bullpen By Attrition
by
Sam Miller

09-03

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9

Baseball Therapy: Do Young Pitchers Fail to Develop When the Bullpen Implodes?
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-02

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2

BP Unfiltered: Reliever Value at the Deadline
by
Andrew Koo

07-25

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0

Bullpen Report: On the Grilli
by
Mike Gianella

07-18

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4

Skewed Left: Jason Grilli, Mark Melancon, and the Pirates Approach to Building a Bullen
by
Zachary Levine

06-18

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2

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Yankees' Post-Rivera Relief Corps
by
Josh Norris

05-17

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 205: Catcher Framing Questions/A Hypothetical Pitching Problem/Post-Start MRIs
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-03

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 195: Bad Body Language/Upgrading Bullpens/Steroids and the Children/BABIP and Bad Luck
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-29

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16

Baseball Therapy: On the Evolution of the Patient Hitter
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-08

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7

BP Unfiltered: The Eight-Man Bullpen Comes Back to Bite the Brewers
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-25

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34

Baseball Therapy: Could the All-Bullpen Approach Actually Work?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-22

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48

Overthinking It: Ranking Rivera
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-01

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12

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing the BP Bullpen (Mis)management Tool
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-18

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3

A Little Relief
by
Jonah Birenbaum

11-05

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13

Baseball Therapy: In Praise of the Modern Bullpen
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-15

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 62: Yankees-Tigers ALCS Update/How Hard is Pitching on Short Rest?/October Bullpen Strategy
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-14

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7

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game One Recap: Tigers 6, Yankees 4
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-05

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7

Overthinking It: Baltimore's Best Bet to Beat Texas
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-26

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3

Pebble Hunting: A Closer Look at Relievers and Leverage
by
Sam Miller

09-12

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 40: The Phillies' Return to 500/A Modest Bullpen Proposal
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-29

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29

Overthinking It: What Stephen Strasburg's Season Could Have Looked Like
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-13

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Mets' Bullpen Doesn't Blow It
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-01

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 11: Train Crossing
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-20

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1

The Platoon Advantage: Venting About Bullpen Woes
by
Cee Angi

05-31

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7

On the Beat: Fireballer in the Hole
by
John Perrotto

05-25

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5

Prospectus Game of the Week: Bullpens, Banana Suits, and Ryan Braun
by
Sam Miller

05-16

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12

The Lineup Card: 11 Surprising Early-Season Stats
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-23

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5

What You Need to Know: Monday, April 23
by
Daniel Rathman

04-18

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0

What You Need to Know: Wednesday, April 18
by
Daniel Rathman

04-15

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5

Expanded Horizons: Relying on Relievers
by
Tommy Bennett

09-09

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4

Overthinking It: Friar Men
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-06

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11

Expanded Horizons: Closers To The Edge
by
Tommy Bennett

04-01

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37

BP Unfiltered: UPDATED NL Projected Opening Day Rosters
by
John Perrotto

04-01

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68

BP Unfiltered: UPDATED AL Projected Opening Day Rosters
by
John Perrotto

02-26

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4

Circling The Bases: Fine Penmanship, Part 2
by
Tim Kniker

01-25

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63

Prospectus Roundtable: Analyzing RoboPitcher
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-11

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9

Checking the Numbers: On the Swing
by
Eric Seidman

10-15

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33

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers vs. Phillies LCS
by
Jay Jaffe

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September 11, 2013 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The A's and Building a Bullpen By Attrition

12

Sam Miller

Why do teams pay for relievers? Because picking them up for nothing is an awful lot of work.

The other day, Ben Lindbergh and I were bantering about relievers who are all of a sudden awesome. Will Smith, Louis Coleman, Neal Cotts, some other guy whose name I have already forgotten. (Ed. note: Kevin Siegrist.) And Ben asked, as somebody always will, why teams still pay for relievers when there seem to be an infinite number of humans capable of pitching like Jonathan Papelbon for a year.

The A’s don’t pay for relievers. Their top seven this year are making about $8 million and cost almost nothing in talent to acquire. The A’s also have the second-best bullpen FRA of the post-expansion era, behind only this year’s Braves. They make it look so easy! But this incredible success is also the answer to Ben’s question. Teams still pay for relievers because the A’s way of doing things takes so much friggin' effort.

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Or, should the Astros invest in some veteran relievers?

Autumn came a little early to Houston this year. You might not have noticed, but the Astros recently became the first American League team to be formally eliminated from the playoffs. It’s not that anyone really expected the Astros to contend this year, but then again, I picked the Angels to win the World Series at the beginning of the year. Shows what we know.

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Do teams tend to overpay for bullpen help at the deadline?

Baseball lore preaches that a team “can never have enough pitching,” but we rarely hear the same thing said about hitting, perhaps because of a sister proverb, “Baseball is 75 percent pitching.” Pitcher fragility plays a big part, of course. But sometimes one poor start or relief outing will cause a team to press for more pitchers: a marginal arm blows up, and suddenly the team needs assistance. When a hitter goes 0-for-4 or 1-for-5, on the other hand, the line is common enough that we don’t bat an eye.

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July 25, 2013 6:00 am

Bullpen Report: On the Grilli

0

Mike Gianella

Mark Melancon and Rex Brothers take over for Jason Grilli and Rafael Betancourt, respectively. More on that, plus the updated rankings and earnings lie within.

Welcome to another installment of The Bullpen Report. As a reminder, closers are rated in five tiers from best to worst. The tiers are a combination of my opinion of a pitcher’s ability, the likelihood that he will pick up saves, and his security in the job. For example, a pitcher in the third tier might have better skills than a pitcher in the second tier, but if the third tier pitcher is new to the job or has blown a couple of saves in the last week this factors into the ranking as well.

Tier 1 – Money in the Bank

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How the Pirates have become a contender with the help of other teams' cast-off parts.

The Pirates blueprint to building the bullpen that has become one of baseball’s best is no longer a guarded secret on the North Shore. While Neil Huntington was away at the All-Star break, an anonymous source who’s not generally much of a talker handed over the plan of how the Pirates did it in five easy steps that will leave the rest of baseball shaking their heads.

1. Trade your best reliever
2. Let a 36-year-old journeyman close
3. Get a bunch of starters who can't go six innings
4. ?????????
5. Sports Illustrated cover





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The Yankees haven't produced many successful homegrown starters, but they have been churning out a wave of cheap relief arms.

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Josh Norris has covered the Trenton Thunder and the Yankees farm system for The Trentonian for the last six seasons and spends his free time filming prospects in plush locales like Scranton, Allentown, Wilmington, Lakewood and Staten Island. Previously, he covered the Eugene Emeralds for Scout.com and Oregon club baseball (before NCAA baseball returned) for the Oregon Daily Emerald.

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Ben and Sam answers listener questions about catcher framing, a very unusual reliever, and cautionary MRIs.



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Ben and Sam discuss whether a pitcher's body language can cost him strikes, whether it's worth trading for relievers early in the season, a study about perceptions of steroid use, and whether a low BABIP is always unlucky.



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Have hitters become too passive, or is there something else going on?

Last week, in an article in Sports Illustrated, Tom Verducci put forth an argument that the modern game of baseball has a problem. Hitters, he claimed, have become too passive in their approach at the plate as they attempt to drive up the pitch counts of the opposing pitcher. He mixes together a couple of case examples (Joey Votto, Jayson Werth) with some data that appear to show that hitters have become more passive in their approach over time, and are paying for it in declining run production. Maybe Joey and Jayson, and by proxy the rest of the baseball players out there, should swing the bat a little more.

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The Brewers fail to put their best foot forward.

Maybe, just maybe, this will turn out to be a significant moment in the history of baseball roster construction:

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Considering all the pros and cons of a revolutionary way to structure a roster.

Baseball games come with built-in subtitles. Dwight Gooden vs. Roger Clemens in the 1986 World Series. Bob Gibson vs. Denny McClain in the 1968 World Series. Kyle Lohse vs. Ross Detwiler in Game 4 of the NLDS last year. It's one thing to see a game between the Yankees and Tigers, but it's an entirely different game if CC Sabathia is pitching against Justin Verlander. And no one ever subtitles the game A-Rod vs. Miguel Cabrera.

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March 22, 2013 9:10 am

Overthinking It: Ranking Rivera

48

Ben Lindbergh

Can the best reliever ever hold a candle to history's strongest starters?

Recently, Mariano Rivera revealed that 2013 would be his final season. It wasn’t unexpected news, in that Rivera is 43 years old and coming off a serious injury that caused him to consider retirement in 2012. But the report, however predictable, hit many fans hard. Not only is Rivera respected and beloved both inside and outside of New York (a relative rarity for a big, bad Yankee), but he’s shown so little erosion in his skills that it’s possible to picture him throwing his cutter until he turns 50. Most players go through a decline phase, which gives us time to get used to the idea that it’s about to be over. Rivera really hasn’t, except in the sense that he’s less durable than he once was.

Rivera’s announcement inspired many written responses, one of which was an email to me from a reader named David Greene. “Rivera’s true ranking among pitchers all-time,” the subject line said.

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