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Articles Tagged Brooks Baseball 

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01-16

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2

BP Unfiltered: RISPy Business
by
Dan Brooks

09-19

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0

BP Announcements: PITCHf/x Leaderboards Have Arrived
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-14

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2

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing Pitch Sequence Visualizations
by
Daniel Mack and Dan Brooks

07-23

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0

BP Announcements: Sabermetrics, Scouting, and the Science of Baseball
by
Dan Brooks

07-13

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33

BP Announcements: Special Events Announcement *Updated July 13*
by
Joe Hamrahi

04-30

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6

BP Unfiltered: Sabermetrics, Scouting, and the Science of Baseball
by
Dan Brooks

04-30

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3

BP Unfiltered: Brooks Baseball Joins Forces with Baseball Prospectus
by
Joe Hamrahi

01-31

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25

Overthinking It: Managing Expectations: Baseball's Next Big Inefficiency
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-26

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10

Inside The Park: Why We Want Players to Remember the Past
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-12

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19

Inside The Park: Remembering Minnie
by
Bradford Doolittle

09-23

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: Adventures in Sabermetrics 101
by
Andy Andres

07-29

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10

On the Beat: The Next General Managers
by
John Perrotto

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-12

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7

Expanded Horizons: Brooks Conrad
by
Tommy Bennett

09-28

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9

Another Look: Baseball Digest
by
Bob Hertzel

06-08

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15

Another Look: Baseball Truly is a Funny Game
by
Bob Hertzel

06-07

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48

Prospectus Idol Entry: Yeah, That Girl Can Play
by
Brian Oakchunas

05-29

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Take Me Out of the Hall Game
by
Jay Jaffe

04-03

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Reminiscing with SFR, the Sequel
by
Dan Fox

11-05

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Player Profile: Brooks Conrad
by
Marc Normandin

01-16

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Prospectus Q&A: Bill James
by
David Laurila

03-23

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Transaction Analysis: March 16-21, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

07-17

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0

On the Mendoza Line
by
Doug Pappas

06-19

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From The Mailbag: The Strike Zone, Old Books and Sammy Sosa
by
Baseball Prospectus

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With the Pitch Usage tool on BrooksBaseball, you can see how certain pitchers vary their offerings depending on the situation.

I’m writing this blog post with the knowledge that a lot of people reading this, especially those who are “inside” baseball, will be shaking their heads at the monitor once they finish. We're used to dismissing RISP statistics because the sample sizes are too small. In this case, though, we appear to see real and meaningful differences.

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BP and Brooks Baseball roll out their latest assault on your free time.

Up until now, the only way to peruse the PITCHf/x data available at Brooks Baseball was to look up each pitcher's player card individually. That was all well and good, but it made comparing pitchers a painstaking process. Fortunately, Dan Brooks just made that process much easier by building some bona fide leaderboards at BP.

These leaderboards draw on the same dataset you see at Brooks Baseball, custom classifications and all. So now it takes a couple of clicks to look up which pitchers throw hardest or softest, which pitches are hardest to hit, and a whole host of other interesting insights. Use the dropdowns to filter by handedness, month, year, pitch type, role, and minimum pitches thrown. You can access additional data by selecting "Outcomes" and "Averages" in the dropdown set to "PITCHf/x" by default.

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Want to know not just what pitches a pitcher throws, but where, when, and in what order he throws them? Now you can.

At Brooks Baseball, we’ve built a repository where you can access almost any information about any pitcher’s pitches and be confident that the pitch types were identified correctly. For example, you can ask how many times batters swung and missed at a Stephen Strasburg changeup, how often batters hit Chris Sale’s slider for a groundball, or what the overall called-strike rate is for Felix Hernandez’s fastball.

But PITCHf/x databasing is still in its infancy. Pitching is not the sum of individual statistics about individual pitches any more than a piece of music is the sum of an individual set of notes. Pitching is a sequence of events—the previous pitch’s execution may be as germane to the outcome of the at-bat as the current pitch’s execution. We often hear about how a pitcher might go up in the zone with a high fastball to raise a batter’s eye level and then down in the zone with a curveball. None of that was captured in the maze of tables and charts already available.

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Saberseminar just over a week away!

Sabermetrics, Scouting, and the Science of Baseball, a weekend seminar for the benefit of the Jimmy Fund, puts you up close with some of baseball’s top coaches, statisticians, scouts, doctors, and scientists. The seminar takes place on August 4 and 5, 2012 in Boston, MA, and is limited to 200 of baseball’s best fans.

Register now so you can join us on August 4 and 5, 2012 at Boston University’s Metcalf Science Center and enjoy the edge that professional scouting, science, and sabermetrics will give you at your next fantasy or real-life baseball game.

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Chats, Book Tour, Stadium Stops

With the 2012 baseball season finally upon us, it's time to announce BP's full slate of interactive events...designed to bring you, our fans and readers, closer to all the action.

Beginning on May 5, we launch our 2012 ballpark tour in St. Petersburg, Florida with the Tampa Bay Rays. From there, the tour continues with confirmed stops in San Diego, New York, Anaheim, Arlington, Minnesota, Kansas City, and Houston. We've partnered with Major League Baseball teams across the country and other great organizations like the Negro League Baseball Museum, The Newberg Report, The Royalman Report, and Royals Authority to bring you a fabulous experience every step of the way. Each event includes a one to two hour pregame discussion and Q & A session with members of Baseball Prospectus, special guests, and baseball operations representatives. Additional activities will be planned for All-Star Sunday in Kansas City.

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Saber Seminar August 4-5

Sabermetrics, Scouting, and the Science of Baseball, a weekend seminar for the benefit of the Jimmy Fund, puts you up close with some of baseball’s top coaches, statisticians, scouts, doctors, and scientists. The seminar takes place on August 4 and 5, 2012 in Boston, MA, and is limited to 200 of baseball’s best fans.

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Brooks Baseball Joins Baseball Prospectus

I'm very excited to announce that Dan Brooks, Harry Pavlidis, and Brooks Baseball have agreed to team up and join forces with Baseball Prospectus. BrooksBaseball.net is the premier site for PITCHf/x analysis and pitch classification. Harry has spent countless hours breaking down the movement, trajectory, and speed of each pitch thrown by every pitcher since 2007, making analysis simple and easy for anyone interested in examining major-league pitching.

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Why the next big step for baseball teams might not be learning something new, but making better use of the information they already have.

“The management and analysis of data, whether it be scouting reports, statistics, medical information or video, is a critical component of our operation. We look forward to developing a customized program that utilizes the most advanced and efficient technology available in the marketplace today to facilitate quicker, easier and more accurate access to all the sources of information we use to make baseball decisions.”—Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein, January 2012

“[Statistical analysis] helps but doesn’t tell the whole story of the game. There is a lot of gut feeling you got to make. If you have a stat and see a flashing number and you see that this guy is doing very good against this other guy, you can use that in a game during a key situation. Yes. But we cannot just depend on stats alone. You got to depend on many other things… I don’t like to become a fantasy manager. The goal for a good manager is to have players who are able to manage themselves on the field.”—Unsuccessful Cubs managerial candidate Sandy Alomar Jr., November 2011

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January 26, 2012 3:00 am

Inside The Park: Why We Want Players to Remember the Past

10

Bradford Doolittle

We shouldn't be surprised when players don't show the same appreciation for baseball history we do, but sometimes the truth still hurts.

In sports, familiarity is more of the heart than the mind. As player valuation becomes uniformly sophisticated across baseball, familiarity has become a non-factor. The new wave of decision makers are as versed in Wall Street jargon as they are in scout speak and aren't too prone to sentiment. (Nor should they be.) The Theo Epsteins and Andrew Friedmans of the world are savvy enough to avoid communicating to fans in those terms, but the mindset is still there. Players are assets, and transactions are opportunities to add value to the franchise. The bond between a player and the team's fan base may be given lip service in the media, but in reality, it matters not at all, or very little. As for the players, the bottom line is almost always the ultimate deciding factor—he's going to go where the dollars flow.

Sometimes, the sentimental and the pragmatic line up nicely. That's what I was thinking when the first messages popped up in my Twitter stream this week bearing the news of Prince Fielder's new contract in Detroit. The kneejerk reaction of many was that the deal was absurdly bloated. (It was.) Others thought Detroit moved well ahead of the competition in the AL Central. (As a Royals fan, that was my second thought.) If you're a Tigers fan, you might have jumped up on your desk and started doing the Dougie. (Can't blame you.) Me, I just thought it was cool that Prince was going to play for the same team on which his father made a name for himself. It's not clear why I should care.

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How one man came to support a borderline statistical candidate for the Hall of Fame whose other contributions strengthen his case.

My first memory about Minnie Minoso stems from 1977, on one of those bright afternoons when I had talked my grandfather into stopping at the dime store on the town square in Red Oak, Iowa. It's just as Sinclair Lewis as it sounds. The store sold baseball cards, and I was working on my Topps collection that summer by picking up four or five 10-cent packs at a time. Not everything at the dime store actually cost a dime, but fifteen baseball cards and one rock-hard piece of bubble gum did, and they came bundled in colorful wax wrappers that I liked so much that I refused to throw them away. My parents didn't give a rip about sports, but my grandfather had played second base in Class-B ball in southwest Iowa in the 1920s and understood what baseball could mean to a young boy. He was glad to fork over change for the cards.

Red Oak had, and still has, the type of rustic town square that was once the primary business district of small midwestern towns. Some communities have courthouses stuck in the middle of their square, but Red Oak has trees, a fountain, and a park. That day, I sat in the grass opening my cards, stuffing the gum in my mouth one piece at a time, while my grandfather lounged on a bench under a tree talking to a fellow retired farmer, who wore a green John Deere hat. The names on the cards didn't mean much to me at the time—it hadn't been that long since I had learned to read—but I loved the team names, the pictures, and of course, the numbers on the back. Suddenly I came across card No. 232 from the 1977 Topps set:

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What happens when sabermetrics goes back to school?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

During the academic year, Andy Andres is a Senior Lecturer of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Boston University, where he teaches biology, physics, and natural sciences. Andres otherwise pursues his baseball passions as instructor of one of the first ever college courses in Sabermetrics offered at Tufts University; as a Datacaster/Stringer for mlb.com at Fenway Park; as a Data Analyst for Ron Shandler’s BaseballHQ.com; and as the Head Coach and Senior Instructor for the MIT Science of Baseball Program.

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John runs down the top candidates for the next GM vacancy.

General managers are never more in the spotlight than they are this week in the days leading up to Sunday's deadline to makes trades without securing waivers on players. How well some of the GMs navigate these next three days could determine their future. Make the right move and get your team to the postseason, and it could result in a contract extension. Fail to improve your club and finish out of the money, and you could be out of a job.

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