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Articles Tagged Brett Lawrie 

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02-14

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16

Fantasy Players to Avoid: Third Basemen
by
BP Fantasy Staff

02-12

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12

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Third Basemen
by
Ben Carsley

02-10

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2

Fantasy Players to Target: Third Basemen
by
BP Fantasy Staff

08-29

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14

What Scouts Are Saying: August 29, 2013
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-03

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Lineup Movers
by
Paul Singman

01-16

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12

The Keeper Reaper: First, Third, and DH for 1/16/13
by
Michael Street

07-30

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5

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, July 30
by
Matthew Kory

07-18

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9

Manufactured Runs: Getting Shifty Again
by
Colin Wyers

07-02

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10

BP Unfiltered: Brett Lawrie Makes Friends Wherever He Goes
by
Sam Miller

06-15

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12

What Scouts Are Saying: Pitchability Is My Middle Name
by
Kevin Goldstein and Bradley Ankrom

06-04

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10

The Week in Quotes: May 28-June 3
by
Hudson Belinsky, Jonah Birenbaum, Andrew Koo and Matthew Rocco

05-29

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2

The Prospectus Hit List: Tuesday, May 29
by
Matthew Kory

05-21

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26

Pebble Hunting: Baseball and the F Word
by
Sam Miller

05-17

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5

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, May 17
by
Matthew Kory

05-16

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28

Overthinking It: Brett Lawrie Was Framed
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-16

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19

What You Need to Know: Wednesday, May 16
by
Daniel Rathman

05-02

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0

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for May 1
by
Larry Granillo

04-12

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13

On the Beat: Who is the Great Unknown?
by
John Perrotto

03-19

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6

Collateral Damage: Bullpen Blowout
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

01-31

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5

The BP First Take: Tuesday, January 31
by
Daniel Rathman

09-20

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21

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Toronto Blue Jays
by
Ben Lindbergh, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

08-11

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19

The BP Trading Post: Middle-Infield Mayhem
by
Derek Carty

08-08

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5

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for August 7
by
Larry Granillo

01-19

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38

Future Shock: Toronto Blue Jays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-06

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46

Transaction Analysis: Adrian Gonzalez and Shaun Marcum
by
Christina Kahrl and Kevin Goldstein

03-17

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23

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, NL
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-10

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23

Future Shock: Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-07

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13

Future Shock: Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-04

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0

Future Shock: Mock Draft 2008
by
Kevin Goldstein

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Thirteen reasons why the national pastime isn't always rated PG.

When I moved up from the 11-and-12 league to 13-and-14, there was a 14-year-old kid named Andrade who had grown himself a pretty good mustache. He caught, and whenever a pitch would get past him, he would yell “F***” as he turned to retrieve the pitch. The first time I heard this, I was shocked, and almost embarrassed. I’d used my share of swears, but never like this, in front of grown-ups. I had no idea that swearing was possible on a baseball field.

Of course, swearing is very possible on a baseball field. Perhaps going back to 1898, major-league baseball has been a place where profanity has thrived. On-field microphones rarely pick up the audio (except in Boston, I've found), but the cameras are careful to catch foul lips in high definition. “Well, if you can read lips,” the announcers sometimes will say. “Hey you can’t say that you’re outta here,” the umpires sometimes will say. Mostly, though, we just move on and don’t talk about it. Let’s talk about it. Why not? We might as well talk about it. What follows is a taxonomy of 13 major-league F-bombs. NSFW? I honestly don't know.

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May 17, 2012 3:14 pm

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, May 17

5

Matthew Kory

Gee! and Oh! are two reasonable reactions to watching Gio Gonzalez dominate.

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May 16, 2012 9:22 am

Overthinking It: Brett Lawrie Was Framed

28

Ben Lindbergh

Brett Lawrie was right to be upset about the two strikes that got him ejected on Tuesday, but framer extraordinaire Jose Molina had as much to do with the calls as umpire Bill Miller.

On Tuesday night, the Rays beat the Blue Jays 4-3. All of the scoring was over by the seventh, but the real action occurred in the bottom of the ninth, when Brett Lawrie was ejected by umpire Bill Miller after arguing balls and strikes, first with loud body language, then with loud words, and finally by transforming his helmet into flying suspension bait. Lawrie probably brushes his teeth more intensely than you’ve ever done anything, so you can only imagine what he looks like when he’s called out on borderline pitches in a close game against a division rival. Actually, that’s not true—imagining it isn’t the only thing you can do. You can also watch this video:

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Brett Lawrie crossed the line when he threw his batting helmet at an umpire.

The Tuesday Takeaway
Brett Lawrie can hit, and the 22-year-old is rapidly learning how to pick it at the hot corner. But the questions about his makeup that led the Brewers to ship him to the Blue Jays in a one-for-one deal that brought back Shaun Marcum reared their ugly heads again last night in an incident that is likely to result in a suspension.

At the plate with nobody on and one out in the bottom of the ninth inning, with Toronto trailing Tampa Bay 4-3, Lawrie worked the count to 3-1. Then, home plate umpire Bill Miller clearly gipped him of a walk, calling a Fernando Rodney fastball that crossed the plate at least four inches outside a strike. The payoff pitch was a changeup that threatened the upper fringe of the zone but stayed an inch or so too high. Miller rang Lawrie up, and—moments later—the young third baseman seemed ready to ring the ump’s bell.


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The tater trots for May 1: Brett Lawrie's walkoff and Dee Gordon gets his first career home run.

Apologies for the late Tater Trot Tracker update from yesterday. All home runs are now updated. Tuesday saw yet another homerless day for both Bryce Harper and Albert Pujols. Here's a good question: who gets their first home run first, Pujols or Harper (and you can even throw in Trout if you want)? As fun as it might be for Harper to long first, I want and expect it to be Pujols.

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Which player do scouts feel is the best unknown major leaguer?

The question was posed to a dozen front-office types and scouts during the final days of spring training: Who is the best player in baseball that nobody knows about? The winner of the highly informal poll was a bit of a surprise, especially since he entered this season having played in just 43 major-league games. Yet there is a strong feeling that Blue Jays third baseman Brett Lawrie won't be a secret much longer.

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March 19, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Bullpen Blowout

6

Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

The Royals' bullpen suffers a couple of blows, and the pain around the rest of the league is plentiful.

Carlos Quentin, San Diego Padres (Right Knee Surgery)
Quentin has had a difficult time staying healthy, and he’s starting his injury train early this year. The outfielder will undergo arthroscopic surgery today to fix a torn meniscus and remove loose bodies from his right knee. Meniscal injuries can cause pain, swelling, or a clicking sensation depending on the type, size, and location of the tear. If left untreated, meniscal tears can lead to arthritis. Loose bodies can also act as irritants and lead to arthritis.

The procedure is straightforward. The surgeon will remove the loose bodies and try to stitch the torn meniscus back together but will most likely have to trim the torn portion because the tissue is degenerated beyond repair. Standard recovery is four to six weeks, but it could vary if there are additional injuries not seen on the MRI. With the recovery expected to be four to six weeks, we should see Quentin back in mid- to late April. When Quentin returns to the outfield, his knee might flare up or swell.


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Did the Brewers make a major mistake in trading Brett Lawrie to the Blue Jays last year?

What a difference a year makes? Last offseason, the Brewers traded top prospect Brett Lawrie to the Blue Jays for Shaun Marcum. This offseason, the Jays had the opportunity to flip Lawrie to the Mariners for Michael Pineda—and, according to Jeff Blair of The Globe and Mail, they turned it down.

Pineda was later traded to the Yankees in a four-player deal also involving Jesus Montero, Hector Noesi, and Jose Campos. But the more interesting fallout here appears to be the change in Lawrie’s value. Marcum is a nice pitcher, to be sure—he was worth 2.9 WARP last season—but he does not have Pineda’s upside, and while Marcum came with just two years of control remaining at the time of the trade, Pineda still has five.

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September 20, 2011 1:19 pm

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Toronto Blue Jays

21

Ben Lindbergh, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

The Jays endure another year of also-ran status in the AL East.

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fade -- whether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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In this new column, BP's fantasy expert discusses the rookie middle-infield crop and the values of various players on the trade market.

Today, I’m proud to announce a brand new BP Fantasy column that has been in the works for quite a while that I’m incredibly excited about. Trading Post will offer insight heretofore unavailable to fantasy baseball players. Using a unique combination of PECOTA rest-of-season projections and CBS’ archive of every fantasy baseball trade that every player has been involved in this season, Trading Post will delve into the value you can expect to receive via trade for the players on your fantasy squad. It will also be able to tell you which players are being undervalued on the trade market and make for good targets. While some fantasy analysis will look at a player’s cold streak and slap a “Buy Low” tag on him, Trading Post will be able to say whether you can actually buy the player low and, if so, will be able to quantify just how “low” he can be bought.

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The 2011 season has seen a flood of middle-infield prospects recalled to take over full-time jobs as rookies—Dustin Ackley, Brett Lawrie, Jason Kipnis, Jemile Weeks, Zach Cozart, Johnny Giavotella, Darwin Barney, and Dee Gordon, to name a few. In this inaugural Trading Post, I’ll look at the cream of the middle-infield crop and see how they’re being valued on the trade market, tossing in a few veteran middle infielders as well.

Trading Post Card Explanation
Each player discussed in Trading Post will receive a “Trading Post Card.” This card will be jam-packed with useful information about each player’s trading profile. It will list information about the player himself, look at every trade the player has been involved in over the past two weeks and every player he’s been traded for, and give information about the average player he’s been traded for. Hopefully these cards will be self-explanatory, but if you’re not sure what anything means, here’s an explanation of everything:


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The tater trots for August 7: four different first-career home runs and a man tumbles over the fence in Wrigley Field.

Four different players added themselves to the lifetime home run leaderboard yesterday, tying the great Duane Kuiper with their first career home runs. Jose Constanza (19.6 seconds) and Johnny Giavotella (22.13 seconds) came through with pretty standard trot times, but Brett Lawrie (17.95 seconds) and Bryan Petersen (17.03 seconds) were nothing of the sort. When I first started the Tater Trot Tracker, I expected to see quite a few super-quick trots from players hitting their first career home runs. That didn't turn out to be the case, but you'd never know it from Lawrie and Petersen.

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January 19, 2011 12:15 pm

Future Shock: Toronto Blue Jays Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

Trades and multiple high picks have helped the Jays transform a barren system into a blooming one.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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