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Articles Tagged Best Season 

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09-25

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1

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH Review
by
Michael Street

03-14

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34

The Lineup Card: 12 Great Seasons by Mediocre Players
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

01-18

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16

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-16

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to Close
by
Jay Jaffe

12-08

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Cardinals' Special Era Reaches a Crossroads
by
Bradford Doolittle

11-22

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: We Need More Awards
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-31

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Silly Goose: Mariano Rivera and the Myth of the Seven-Out Save
by
Kevin Baker

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-29

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0

Painting the Black: Sizing Up the Playoff Rotations
by
R.J. Anderson

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-14

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20

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 2
by
R.J. Anderson

07-12

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7

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 1
by
R.J. Anderson

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

05-23

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24

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders
by
Steven Goldman

03-30

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11

On the Beat: No Excuses
by
John Perrotto

03-14

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7

Baseball ProGUESTus: Investigating the "Best Shape" Phenomenon
by
Rob Pettapiece

02-25

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38

Future Shock: Philadelphia Phillies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-22

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38

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-18

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68

Future Shock: New York Yankees Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-16

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38

Future Shock: Minnesota Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-14

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29

Future Shock: San Francisco Giants Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-08

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44

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-03

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39

Future Shock: Texas Rangers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-01

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22

Future Shock: San Diego Padres Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-11

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41

Future Shock: Oakland Athletics Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

12-20

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Starting Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

12-14

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26

Future Shock: Houston Astros Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-30

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41

Future Shock: Cleveland Indians Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-24

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36

Future Shock: Washington Nationals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-19

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62

Future Shock: Kansas City Royals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-17

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34

Future Shock: Baltimore Orioles Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-12

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23

Future Shock: Arizona Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-08

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71

Future Shock: Pittsburgh Pirates Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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17

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Rangers vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

10-06

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46

Prospectus Hit List: The Finale
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

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19

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Preview: Twins vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

07-26

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34

Transaction Action: Send Me Some Angels
by
Christina Kahrl and Kevin Goldstein

07-21

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38

Transaction Action: ALtruisms
by
Christina Kahrl

03-17

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23

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, NL
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-14

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8

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, AL
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-06

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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23

Prospectus Today: Infield Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

10-18

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5

Winter League Preview
by
Carlos J. Lugo

10-12

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3

Prospectus Hit List: Season Finale
by
Jay Jaffe

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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September 29, 2011 9:00 am

Painting the Black: Sizing Up the Playoff Rotations

0

R.J. Anderson

Going team by team to determine which collection of hurlers is most imposing this October.

Nate Silver spent the final week of September 2006 evaluating playoff rotations in a manner reflected in his other work across various fields. The analysis was intuitive, yet innovative and unrivaled. What Silver incorporated that basic playoff rotation analyses often exclude is uneven workloads. Playoff teams may designate four starters, but they shift parts around due to the sporadic schedule and threat of extinction; after all, if a loss makes elimination inevitable, logic dictates having the best man lead the final surge.

The usage numbers Silver presented then are now dated, but the ones provided below are not, thanks to intern Bradley Ankrom. These new percentages include every postseason series since 1995, classifying the starters’ roles by their order of appearance in the playoffs. That means the number ones are the pitchers who started the team’s first playoff game, the number twos are those who started the team’s second playoff game, and so on. Some may note that this methodology may be skewed by the new playoff schedule, although until proven otherwise it should still provide more context than other tactics.

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August 4, 2011 12:17 am

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB

1

Michael Street

In his fifth Asian Equation column, Michael looks at the relievers who have enjoyed modest success--and failure--making the move from Japan to America.

The last group in my analysis of the player’s who have migrated to MLB from Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) are the relievers, the least appreciated members of a successful baseball team. Yet, of all NPB imports, they have been the most numerous (explaining the length of this article, for which I apologize in advance) and the cheapest. Diminished quality is the most obvious reason for these extremes, since starters who don’t meet MLB standards get shifted to the bullpen, and lesser talents also keep salaries down. Additionally, the typical NPB pitcher’s arsenal matches well with an MLB reliever’s skillset.

As I discussed in my last Asian Equation article, NPB is a breaking ball league, which translates better to relief than starting. A good breaking ball might fool major league hitters the first or second time they see it in a game, but it probably won’t the third or fourth time. As an illustration, here’s how batter OPS rises against two of the biggest NPB starting-pitcher busts as compared with three current MLB pitchers: the best, the most mediocre, and an old junkballer. While MLB batters’ performance improves against each pitcher the more times they see him in a game, the change is far more dramatic with Matsuzaka and Kawakami.

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Concluding the two-part series by reviewing the best and worst first-half pitchers for each team.

To recap my methodology, here is what I wrote in the positional players’ piece earlier this week:

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Reviewing the best and worst first-half position players on each team.

In the numerical sense, the halfway point of the season arrived about a week ago. However, the All-Star break marks the arbitrary end point of the first half, bringing a few days of festivities and vacations to the forefront. That period of inactivity in games that matter offers a window into the frozen stats for each team, allowing us to see who is leading the charge and who is failing the team so far. 

In order to determine who’s been naughty and who’s been nice, I’ll enlist the aid of the Wins Above Replacement metric. Next time, we’ll cover the pitchers, but for today, it’s all about the position players.

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Due to reader response, the annotated list continues with 21st through 31st best seasons of all time, featuring Mike Piazza, Ernie Banks, and more third basemen of the 1970s.

Our collection of BP-flavored single-season WARP scores currently goes back to 1950. Now that we’ve added fielding runs to the sortable choices, you can easily see the combination of offense and defense that made the top players during this period so valuable, and in some cases dragged them down from even higher perches.

On Monday, I used the newly revised list to take a look at the top 20 seasons of the last 60 years. Due to reader enthusiasm and the fact that I find this kind of thing to be tremendous fun, I’ve expanded the scope to include the top 50, continuing today with the player-seasons that rank 21 through 31.

21. Frank Robinson, OF, 1966: 11.0
Robinson, newly arrived with the Baltimore Orioles after the Reds called him “an old 30,” won the triple crown, joining Mickey Mantle ’56 and Carl Yastrzemski ’67 in the top 50. He picked up a unanimous MVP award, Given how much grief the voters have deservedly taken over the years, it’s reassuring to see how many of these great seasons have won. Of the top 11, the voters rewarded all but three, and one of those was Sammy Sosa's ’01, who the voters passed over in favor of Barry Bonds' ’01, which was even better. Here are the other occasions to this point in the rankings where the voters failed to reward one of the 20 best seasons in history:


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A trip through our new 1950-and-up leaderboard, including a close look at our new-formula fielding runs.

Our collection of BP-flavored single-season WARP scores currently goes back to 1950. Now that we’ve added fielding runs to the sortable choices, you can easily see the combination of offense and defense that made the top players during this period so valuable, and in some cases dragged them down from even higher perches. Herein we traipse quickly through the 20 best players of the Truman-Eisenhower years and onward.

The fielding runs featured here are the product of our new revised formula developed by Colin Wyers. As Colin says, “The difficult part of any defensive metric is estimating the batted-ball distribution among fielders. Old FRAA used season-level data about things like pitcher handedness to figure out the distribution on a seasonal level, and prorated it out to individual fielders. Now, FRAA uses play-by-play data, which allows us to use more variables (like whether or not a fielder has to hold on a runner) and to assign responsibility to each fielder based on the games he actually played in.”

This version of FRAA avoids the pitfall of subjectivity inherent in zone-based ratings. “In contrast to other popular metrics,  FRAA does not use any stringer-recorded observational data,” Colin explains. “Serious discrepancies have been noted between data providers, and research has shown that in larger samples use of that sort of batted-ball data introduces severe distortions in the metrics that impede accuracy. Without evidence that the batted-ball data has redeeming value in the short term, it seems imprudent to use that sort of data in our evaluation of player defense.”

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March 30, 2011 9:00 am

On the Beat: No Excuses

11

John Perrotto

Thirty players who need to step up their games in 2011.

All spring training clichés go out the window on Thursday. It will be Opening Day for 12 teams, with the other 18 beginning their seasons the following day. There will be no more talk about pitchers just getting their work in and hitters grooving their swings. Managers will no longer be talking about how the results don't matter.

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Should we expect better things ahead for players who report to Spring Training in the proverbial best shape of their lives?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Rob Pettapiece, a recent Mathematics graduate from the University of Waterloo, wrote for Batter's Box for two years, currently edits the CIS Blog, and provides statistical analysis and consulting to coaches and journalists in several sports.


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February 25, 2011 6:06 pm

Future Shock: Philadelphia Phillies Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

You want ceiling? We got your ceilings right here.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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February 22, 2011 9:29 am

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

The pipeline of talent keeps flowing with the always-impressive Rays system.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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February 18, 2011 9:30 am

Future Shock: New York Yankees Top 11 Prospects

68

Kevin Goldstein

With a quartet of five-star prospects and a wealth of pitching overall, no system in baseball took a bigger step forward last year.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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