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11-19

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24

Bizball: Marlins Ownership and a History Lesson in Greed
by
Maury Brown

06-06

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48

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Books
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-23

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12

Inside The Park: Ode to a Terrible Stat
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-30

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3

Wezen-Ball: John McGraw & Christy Mathewson: Out-of-Copyright Authors
by
Larry Granillo

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

01-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-17

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76

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Movies of All-Time
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-02

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80

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing the BP Advisory Board
by
Joe Hamrahi

12-19

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5

BP Unfiltered: Best of Baseball Prospectus Christmas Contest
by
Dave Pease

12-02

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89

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing Best of Baseball Prospectus: 1996-2011
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-30

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13

The Lineup Card: BP Holiday Gift Guide
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-10

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Interviews with an Indelible Owner
by
Tim Marchman

05-05

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A Statistician Rereads Bill James
by
Andrew Gelman

05-04

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: The GM Starter Pack
by
Gary Huckabay

03-22

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50

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement
by
Jay Jaffe

02-21

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16

Baseball ProGUESTus: Scorecasting Review
by
Phil Birnbaum

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

06-23

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9

Transaction Action: Shuffling Seniors
by
Christina Kahrl

05-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Dorothy Seymour Mills
by
David Laurila

03-14

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8

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, AL
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-02

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3

Prospectus Q&A: All the Lettuce
by
David Laurila

08-13

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Lars Anderson
by
David Laurila

01-27

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mike Pagliarulo
by
David Laurila

01-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Greg Rhodes
by
David Laurila

08-09

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0

Bonds Responses
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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0

Prospectus Today: A Failure of Leadership
by
Joe Sheehan

11-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Off the Field
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

12-13

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0

Prospectus Matchups: Random Passages
by
Jim Baker

01-06

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0

The Class of 2004
by
Jay Jaffe

08-19

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Armour & Dan Levitt, Part II
by
Jonah Keri

07-08

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Allen Barra
by
Alex Belth

05-14

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Angell, Part II
by
Alex Belth

07-19

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

02-01

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0

The Prospectus Projections Project
by
David Cameron and Greg Spira

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January 7, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Greg Rhodes

0

David Laurila

The Reds official historian shares his knowledge of Cincinnati baseball and its key figures, including Fred Hutchinson and Bob Howsam.

Greg Rhodes is the official team historian of the Cincinnati Reds. Formerly the executive director of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum, Rhodes is the co-author of six books on the Reds and a two-time winner of The Sporting News-SABR Baseball Research Award. David talked to Rhodes about some of the key figures, and events, in Reds history.

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August 9, 2007 12:00 am

Bonds Responses

0

Baseball Prospectus

The past might be a foreign country, but at the moment, where 756 is concerned, we're still well within its borders. What does the gang think of Barry Bonds' achievement?

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Maury Brown : There ought to be one word that comes to mind when taking in Bonds' place as the all-time home run king. Maybe that word is 'confused.' Or cloudy, muddy, murky... take your pick. In the history of sports, I don't think anyone has ever faced the dilemma of asking whether or not a record was legitimately set or not. Barry Bonds has forced us to look at that issue with arguably the most revered and sacred of records in baseball. After all, the record has been achieved, and controversy be damned, he hasn't failed a drug test, nor has he been indicted by the Feds, nor has some mountain of evidence landed in George Mitchell's lap that makes one think that Bonds is going to be the focus of his soon-to-be published report.

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The commissioner finally acknowledged history, but in a way the game didn't need.

In a manner that can only be described as "grudging," Bud Selig did what he should have done three months ago, ending discussion of whether he would attend Barry Bonds' pursuit of the all-time home run mark with a press release and a flight to San Francisco. As is his wont, Selig put his personal feelings ahead of the game's best interest, choosing to issue a release that neither honored Bonds nor the moment, and put the controversy that surrounds Bonds-his alleged use of performance-enhancing substances-front and center.

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November 1, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Off the Field

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Joe Sheehan

Some news away from the diamond got a bit lost in all the baseball last month.

In looking back, there's not as much good material left on the cutting-room floor as I thought there was, so I'm going to skip it. Apparently, I do a better job of leaving the weak stuff behind on a day-to-day basis than I think I do, and yes, you're welcome to treat that sentence as a set-up line.

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October 12, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On

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Joe Sheehan

The death of Cory Lidle cast a pall over the League Championship Series, but baseball marches on.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160675929_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

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December 13, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: Random Passages

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Jim Baker

Jim flips through his massive book collection for some fun and interesting passages.

This amused me, of course. I was working in book publishing at the time and had developed an animosity towards those who didn't read. My logic was that, if more people read, my job wouldn't pay so blessedly little.

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January 6, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2004

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Jay Jaffe

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, there are few topics more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?" And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise. With that being said, I thought it would interesting to see what some of Baseball Prospectus' newly updated measures of player evaluation had to say on the topic. For the uninitiated, BP's Davenport Translated Player Cards measure a player's value above replacement level for offense, defense, and pitching while adjusting for context--park effects, level of offense, era, length of season, and in Clay's own words, "the distortions caused by not having to face your own team's defense." The Davenport Cards offer the most sophisticated statistical summaries available; if you can adjust for it, it's in there. The basic currencies of the Davenport system, whether it's offense, defense, or pitching, are runs and wins, more specifically, runs above replacement level and wins above replacement level.

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, few topics are more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?"

And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise.

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August 19, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Armour & Dan Levitt, Part II

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Jonah Keri

Continuing from Part I of the discussion with Paths To Glory authors Mark Armour and Levitt... BP: Reading about certain teams--the '97 Marlins immediately come to mind--there seems to be a strong preference among some people for teams that build from within instead of buying a pennant. Having covered both kinds of teams in the book, is there a way that strikes you as more effective? Is one way somehow more noble than the other? Levitt: My take is that the aim of the game is to win. As long as you don't cheat, however you do it is fine. Building through the farm system is a good way to do it because it's cheaper. But when (Charles) Comiskey bought Eddie Collins and Joe Jackson in 1914 and 1915, he was taking advantage of the economics of the time; other teams could have done the same, and didn't. I don't feel that one way is the noble way and one way is the evil way. Good organizations will use any and all methods to build a winner. Armour: One reason we chose to write about the Marlins was that history has mistreated them. Some of that is because they went on a spending spree, then won. Then the team was torn apart. They deserved to be criticized for being torn apart. But the way they were built was brilliant. They were an expansion team, and they had the right approach. They built a strong farm system. Then they identified what they needed. They decided they needed a cleanup hitter and third baseman, a left fielder and a starting pitcher. So they got the best player available for each job, Bobby Bonilla, Moises Alou, and Alex Fernandez. It's not that it's not noble to spend and win, just that it's hard. A lot of teams have gone out and tried to spend a lot of money. But it's hard to find three good players to fill three holes, or five to fill five. The Marlins did this really well. Levitt: The problem with modern free agency and buying players that way is that great players often only become available when they're in their 30s. People don't realize that Bonds and Maddux are the best of the free agent signings, and that it's hard to get a real impact player that way, let alone someone like Bonds or Maddux. There's also a lot of thought that buying a bunch of players is a new idea, but it's not. Tom Yawkey in the 30s did it with the Red Sox, and the Yankees also did it in the 30s. Comiskey did it, and so did the Boston Braves in the 40s. The great teams have almost always acquired a bunch of their players through purchases. If you look at a team like the Pirates in the late 40s though, after Bing Crosby bought the team, they spent a lot of money on a bunch of old players, including Hank Greenberg, and that didn't help them at all--they still finished last every year.

Baseball Prospectus: You covered a large number of teams over a period of 100 years for the book. What kinds of research materials did you use to get your information, especially for the oldest teams?

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July 8, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Allen Barra

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Alex Belth

Allen Barra has written for numerous publications since the late-1970s, including The Village Voice, The Wall Street Journal, and currently The New York Times. In 2002, Barra authored Clearing the Bases: The Greatest Baseball Debates of the Last Century, which took a refreshing look at some of baseball's most argued topics. Recently, BP correspondent Alex Belth caught up with Barra to discuss his early days as a writer, the influence of Bill James on his work, and Major League Baseball's marketing department.

Baseball Prospectus: So what team did you root for as a kid?

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May 14, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Angell, Part II

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Alex Belth

Alex Belth returns with the second installment of his Q&A with sportswriter Roger Angell, discussing the Yankees of recent vintage, Barry Bonds, Bill James, and more.

Baseball Prospectus: What are your impressions of the Yankees during the past 10 years?

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ANAHEIM ANGELS Placed RHP Al Levine on the 15-day DL (shoulder tendinitis), retroactive to 6/27; recalled RHP John Lackey from Salt Lake. [6/28] I don't disagree with the idea of bringing up John Lackey to move into the rotation. Lackey is the organization's best upper-level prospect, and he's obviously ready to go.

Recalled RHP Matt Wise from Salt Lake; optioned RHP John Lackey to Salt Lake. [6/25]

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