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Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged Best Baseball Books 

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11-19

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24

Bizball: Marlins Ownership and a History Lesson in Greed
by
Maury Brown

06-06

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48

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Books
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-23

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12

Inside The Park: Ode to a Terrible Stat
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-30

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3

Wezen-Ball: John McGraw & Christy Mathewson: Out-of-Copyright Authors
by
Larry Granillo

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

01-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-17

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76

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Movies of All-Time
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-02

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80

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing the BP Advisory Board
by
Joe Hamrahi

12-19

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5

BP Unfiltered: Best of Baseball Prospectus Christmas Contest
by
Dave Pease

12-02

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89

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing Best of Baseball Prospectus: 1996-2011
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-30

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13

The Lineup Card: BP Holiday Gift Guide
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-10

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Interviews with an Indelible Owner
by
Tim Marchman

05-05

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A Statistician Rereads Bill James
by
Andrew Gelman

05-04

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: The GM Starter Pack
by
Gary Huckabay

03-22

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50

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement
by
Jay Jaffe

02-21

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16

Baseball ProGUESTus: Scorecasting Review
by
Phil Birnbaum

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

06-23

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9

Transaction Action: Shuffling Seniors
by
Christina Kahrl

05-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Dorothy Seymour Mills
by
David Laurila

03-14

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8

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, AL
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-02

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3

Prospectus Q&A: All the Lettuce
by
David Laurila

08-13

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Lars Anderson
by
David Laurila

01-27

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mike Pagliarulo
by
David Laurila

01-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Greg Rhodes
by
David Laurila

08-09

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0

Bonds Responses
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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0

Prospectus Today: A Failure of Leadership
by
Joe Sheehan

11-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Off the Field
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

12-13

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0

Prospectus Matchups: Random Passages
by
Jim Baker

01-06

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0

The Class of 2004
by
Jay Jaffe

08-19

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Armour & Dan Levitt, Part II
by
Jonah Keri

07-08

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Allen Barra
by
Alex Belth

05-14

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Angell, Part II
by
Alex Belth

07-19

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

02-01

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0

The Prospectus Projections Project
by
David Cameron and Greg Spira

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A treasure trove of archived video fosters appreciation for the wit and wisdom of the late, great Bill Veeck.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Tim Marchman writes about sports and can be reached at tlmarchman@gmail.com.

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Bill James may claim to study baseball questions, not statistical ones, but what happens when a statistician studies Bill James?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Andrew Gelman is a professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University. He occasionally blogs on baseball, including here, here, here, and here.


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What books would you most want to see in your general manager's library?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

At the request of reader Jim, we revisit Gary's list of books that every GM should read—in addition to all the BP books published subsequently, of course—which originally ran as a "6-4-3" column on September 5th, 2003.


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March 22, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement

50

Jay Jaffe

Contrary to what you might hear from more retrograde members of the baseball establishment, sabermetrics and storytelling don't have to be at odds.

As Opening Day approaches, hope springs eternal all around the majors. Some teams' bids at contention are founded upon the presumed maturation of exciting youngsters. Others rest their hopes on their stars' ability to turn back the clock and play as though their time had never passed. You could be forgiven for thinking that the latter was the strategy of the Anti-Sabermetric Brigade, a constellation of writers who insist upon fighting a war that has been fought and largely settled. Yet, signs of their resurgence keep popping up.

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Our latest guest contributor tackles some of the popular new book's more controversial findings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Phil Birnbaum is the editor of “By the Numbers,” the SABR Statistical Analysis publication. He blogs at sabermetricresearch.blogspot.com, where he has commented on Scorecasting in more detail.

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A look at the first basemen on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Having kicked off this year's JAWS series with the starting pitchers, today we turn our attention to the first basemen, a slate which includes the ballot's best newcomer as well as its most controversial first-timer, and a few holdovers who aren't going anywhere for entirely different reasons.

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June 23, 2010 9:00 am

Transaction Action: Shuffling Seniors

9

Christina Kahrl

The atrocity of arbitration avoidance, Giant roster expansion, Fishy futility, and more.

ATLANTA BRAVES
Team Audit | Player Cards | Depth Chart

Activated RHP Takashi Saito from the 15-day DL; optioned RHP Craig Kimbrel to Gwinnett (Triple-A). [6/21]

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The historian talks about the vast research she has done on the social aspects of baseball.

Dorothy Seymour Mills is a giant among baseball researchers and historians. Mills and her late husband, Harold Seymour, were among the inaugural class of recipients of the Society for American Baseball Research’s Henry Chadwick Award, which honors the game’s great researchers, historians, statisticians, analysts, and archivists. She collaborated on three groundbreaking books with her late husband: Baseball: The Early Years [1960], Baseball: The Golden Age [1971], and Baseball: The People’s Game [1990]. Her most recent book is Chasing Baseball. Mills, now 82 years young, talked about her life as a baseball researcher during SABR’s annual Seymour Medal Conference, held recently in Cleveland. The award, which honors the best book of baseball history or biography published the previous year, is named after her and Harold Seymour.

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March 14, 2010 1:24 pm

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, AL

8

Kevin Goldstein

Looking ahead to who could top next year's prospects lists in the junior loop.

One of the most frequent questions I get, be it via e-mail, chats, or the comment sections in the articles, is which player on [insert team here] has the best shot at moving into the Top 101. That's a much different question from who is the best prospect not in the Top 101, as the focus needs to move solely to growth potential. Building on last year's "Future Top Dogs" series, let's keep that category in this year's version, while also taking an honest list at last year's prognostications.

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A year-end best-of from the interview columns of 2008.

The Prospectus Q&A series was once again a regular Sunday feature in 2008, and as the primary author I hope that you found the interviews to be both informative and entertaining. A wide range of personalities from within the game of baseball shared their thoughts and opinions with BP readers from January to December, and here are some of their best quotes:

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The Red Sox prospect talks about life out on the diamond and on the inside.

Lars Anderson is more than just one of the top hitting prospects in the game, because the 20-year-old native of Carmichael, California is also one of the most thoughtful and intellectually curious. Anderson bypassed a scholarship to Cal-Berkeley to sign with the Red Sox in 2006, and began this season in High-A. After shining there, he has continued to wield a potent bat since a mid-July promotion to Double-A Portland. The lefty-swinging Anderson, a 6'4" 215 pound first baseman, is hitting .317/.410/.520 with 16 home runs on the season, and impressing scouts along the way.

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January 27, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Mike Pagliarulo

0

David Laurila

Former big leaguer Mike Pagliarulo shares some ideas about consulting and information within MLB.

Mike Pagliarulo hit 32 home runs for the Yankees in 1987, and was a key contributor to the World Series champion Twins in 1991, but his impact on the game has arguably been greater since retiring. Successful, and sometimes controversial, "Pags" has been at the forefront of scouting Japanese baseball for the past 10 years, both advising and correctly predicting results on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. A third baseman during his playing days, Pagliarulo hit .241 with 134 home runs over 11 big league seasons with five teams.

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