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04-14

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2

Free Agent Watch: Week 2
by
George Bissell

04-13

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0

Deep League Report: Week Two
by
Scooter Hotz

04-08

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7

BP Unfiltered: The Eight-Man Bullpen Comes Back to Bite the Brewers
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-22

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14

Fantasy Mailbag: Profar or Taveras?
by
BP Fantasy Staff

04-04

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9

The Lineup Card: 11 Bench Players Who Could Have a Big Impact
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-17

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17

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Greatness of Gary Carter
by
Jay Jaffe

10-03

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7

On the Beat: The Next Managers
by
John Perrotto

04-14

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17

Overthinking It: Baffled by the Brewers Bench
by
Ben Lindbergh

02-10

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6

Purpose Pitches: Farrell, Mattingly, and Roenicke
by
Christina Kahrl

06-29

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22

Top 10 Week: Manager Prospects
by
John Perrotto

05-05

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7

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester
by
Ken Funck

04-01

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15

BP Unfiltered: Latest Projected Roster Updates 3/31, 12:30 a.m. ET
by
John Perrotto

04-01

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37

BP Unfiltered: UPDATED NL Projected Opening Day Rosters
by
John Perrotto

04-01

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68

BP Unfiltered: UPDATED AL Projected Opening Day Rosters
by
John Perrotto

02-21

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Jauss
by
David Laurila

11-22

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23

Prospectus Today: Infield Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

10-30

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Jeff Datz
by
David Laurila

10-18

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Prospectus Q&A: Ron Roenicke
by
David Laurila

05-21

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Transaction Analysis: Flipping Fishies and Still-Ancient Mariners
by
Christina Kahrl

04-02

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0

Transaction Analysis: NL East Rosters Review
by
Christina Kahrl

04-12

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Transaction of the Day: Roster Reviews of the Easts
by
Christina Kahrl

04-03

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Transaction of the Day: Roster Reviews of the Wests
by
Christina Kahrl

02-27

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Prospectus Today: Gold Gloves in February
by
Joe Sheehan

10-30

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 23-30
by
Alex Carnevale

10-05

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Roster Reviews
by
Christina Kahrl

09-01

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Transaction Analysis: August 28-31, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

08-04

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Transaction Analysis: July 31-August 3
by
Christina Kahrl

09-01

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Transaction Analysis: August 26-31
by
Christina Kahrl

04-12

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Transaction Analysis: March 29-April 4, 2005
by
Christina Kahrl

03-25

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2005--Setting the Stage
by
Will Carroll

02-14

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0

Transaction Analysis: Offseason - The Easts
by
Christina Kahrl

09-30

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0

Thanks for the Memories
by
Jonah Keri

08-21

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0

Rational Exuberance: A Better Way to Build a Baseball Team
by
Jonah Keri

06-23

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 17-20
by
Christina Kahrl

04-27

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Transaction Analysis: April 19-25, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

04-02

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0

Can Of Corn: Bleeding Cardinal Red
by
Dayn Perry

03-11

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Arizona Diamondbacks, Kansas City Royals, Philadelphia Phillies
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-11

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0

Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

10-07

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0

Playoff Health Report: League Championship Series
by
Will Carroll

09-29

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0

Playoff Health Report: National League
by
Will Carroll

08-27

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0

Transaction Analysis: August 19-24
by
Christina Kahrl

07-25

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0

Transaction Analysis: July 7-20
by
Christina Kahrl

07-02

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 26-30, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

06-25

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 16-22, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

06-07

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 27-June 5, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

05-23

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Montreal Expos, San Francisco Giants, Toronto Blue Jays
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-09

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0

Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

05-01

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Transaction Analysis: April 25-29, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

03-27

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Transaction Analysis: March 19-25, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

03-18

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Transaction Analysis: March 6-13, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

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April 14, 2017 6:00 am

Free Agent Watch: Week 2

2

George Bissell

Grab Asbrubal Cabrera and Michael Lorenzen while you still can. And how about the Ryan Zimmerman revival?

12-Team Mixed Leagues (Must be available in at least 50 percent of ESPN, Yahoo, and CBS leagues)

Hitters

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April 13, 2017 6:00 am

Deep League Report: Week Two

0

Scooter Hotz

Injuries beget playing time for backups, and a closer already has lost his job.

Injuries to prominent players such as Gary Sanchez, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Trea Turner have freed up playing time for some bench players. A closer lost his job, too, and the guy who is taking over isn’t the guy that most people thought it would be. Plus, the usual assortment of bullpen arms with good strikeout rates or a shaky closer ahead of them and hitters on the bad side of a platoon. It might be mid-April, but the Deep League Report is rounding into midseason form.

AL-ONLY POSITION PLAYERS

Guillermo Heredia

He wasn’t a lock to head north with the big club after spring training, but Guillermo Heredia made the Mariners roster. The 26-year-old Cuban is a plus defender at all three outfield spots with a good approach at the plate, but he doesn’t have much in the way of home-run power or stolen-base potential. He’s a fourth outfielder for now behind Leonys Martin, Jarrod Dyson and Mitch Haniger, so he won’t get regular plate appearances for the time being, but Dyson and Haniger haven’t been everyday players in the majors before, so it’s not-too hard to imagine one of them struggling and Heredia getting a shot at a larger role. And note that he’s a better bet in OBP leagues than AVG leagues due to his plate discipline.

Austin Romine

The injury to Sanchez has given Romine a shot at regular playing time behind the plate for the Yankees for around a month. He’s not much of a hitter with a career line of .219/.256/.324 in 371 plate appearances, but in deep AL-only leagues, a starter’s share of playing time is a big asset, even if the guy doing the hitting isn’t a particularly strong hitter. Kyle Higashioka was recalled to back up Romine, but he shouldn’t pose much of a threat to Romine’s playing time unless Romine really craters. Anecdotally, I bought Wilson Ramos in my AL-Only home league this past Saturday, giving me zero plate appearances for the first few months of the season at one of my catching slots. It made sense for me to pursue Romine to give me a good number of plate appearances at a slot that otherwise would be a dead one. I bid $6 of my $100 FAAB budget on Romine for this coming week and won him, causing me to do a little fist pump after the bids were processed. Deep AL-only and NL-only leagues make us do weird things.

Chris Young

The knee injury that landed Bradley on the DL has landed Chris Young a spot in the Boston lineup for as long as Bradley is out. So far, there is no timeline for Bradley’s return, so there’s no way to say how long the 33-year-old Young will be in the lineup. He has been a batting-average risk in the past but, to his credit, he has hit above .250 in each of the past two seasons. His speed on the base paths is mostly gone, but he still has a bit of home-run pop and will be hitting in a high-scoring Red Sox lineup. If you’re short on plate appearances, Young can help until Bradley gets back.

Other Options: Higashioka, Austin Jackson, Trey Mancini

AL-ONLY PITCHERS

Brad Peacock

When he was added to the Astros roster at the start of the season, Peacock was expected to be a long reliever. So far, he has thrown 3 2/3 innings across three appearances, which isn’t terribly long. Those innings have been very good, as he’s currently posting a 0.00 ERA and a 0.55 WHIP with six strikeouts and two walks. He’s about as far down the list for saves in Houston as it gets, so don’t expect anything from him in that category, but he could be useful for rate stats and strikeouts going forward. Plus, writing about Peacock lets me link to this clip, which is nice.

Adam Warren

The fact that Adam Warren can throw multiple innings per outing makes him a valuable asset to the Yankees out of their bullpen and makes him a valuable asset to his owners in deep AL-only leagues, too. Like Brad Peacock, he’s unlikely to get within spitting distance of saves. What Warren should do is post good rate stats and a decent number of strikeouts. Yes, I know that the 29-year-old has never struck out a batter per inning in a full season, but his ability to throw multiple innings and even pick up a spot start or two allow him to throw more innings than most relievers, enabling him to rack up K's. And for what it’s worth, he has a perfect 0.00 ERA and a perfect 0.00 WHIP with seven strikeouts (and no walks or hits, obviously) in six innings across three appearances.

Blake Parker

The 4.50 ERA that Parker is sporting right now isn’t all that attractive, but the rest of his line is: a 0.75 WHIP with seven strikeouts and no walks in four innings out of the Angels bullpen. I watched him throw an inning during the first week of the season, and the batters he faced looked uncomfortable. I couldn’t tell if it was the movement on his pitches or his annoyingly twitchy pre-pitch routine that unsettled his opponents, but whatever it was, he looked like he was in complete command of each plate appearance. At 31 years old, the 6’3” righty is no rated rookie, but he could be helpful with rate stats and strikeouts in deep leagues for owners looking to fill in a vacancy on their staff via the free-agent pool. And given the uncertainty in the Angels’ bullpen, it isn’t difficult to imagine a scenario where Parker inherits the closer’s role a month or two from now thanks to his own hot start and the failings of the pitchers ahead of him on the depth chart.

Other Options: Danny Farquhar, Zach Putnam, Jose Leclerc

NL-ONLY POSITION PLAYERS

Wilmer Difo

The injury to Turner (along with another to Stephen Drew) means more playing time for Difo and in the short term. The 25-year-old Difo doesn’t have a lot of power, but he has legitimate speed and could pick up a handful of steals in short order before Turner returns. It looks like Turner won’t be out much longer, so don’t expect more than a week or two of starter’s playing time from Difo. If you could use some steals in the short term, though, Difo is a decent bet.

Alen Hanson

He doesn’t have regular playing time at second, shortstop or third with Josh Harrison, Jordy Mercer and David Freese starting, but none of those three are great bets to hit enough and stay healthy enough to keep Hanson on the bench all season. The 24-year-old doesn’t have much home-run power, but he has stolen more than 30 bases in four of the past five minor-league seasons. In the current low-steal environment, Hanson could swipe enough bags to be an asset in deep NL-only leagues, even if he spends the year as a utility infielder.

Jabari Blash

If you need power in a deep NL-only league, take a long look at Jabari Blash. Throughout his minor-league career, the 27-year-old has been a classic Three True Outcomes hitter, launching loads of home runs and drawing plenty of walks while striking out a ton. The 6’5” outfielder hasn’t gotten much playing time yet, but he could at least end up on the bad side of a platoon if any of the trio of young outfielders starting for the Padres struggle for an extended period of time. His walk rate makes him an appealing option in OBP leagues, but if he can’t get his career strikeout rate below 40 percent sometime soon, he won’t get a chance to draw many walks.

Other Options: T.J. Rivera, Scott Van Slyke

NL-ONLY PITCHERS

Joaquin Benoit

In the wake of Jeanmar Gomez’ implosion over the weekend, Joaquin Benoit was named the new closer in Philadelphia. The 39-year-old was a bit of a surprise selection over Hector Neris, who was stashed by many owners in deep leagues in their auctions. Benoit might have been selected as much for his guaranteed contract as he was for his pitching ability—each save racked up by the arbitration-eligible Neris would increase his probable salary in arbitration. This isn’t a problem with Benoit since he has a guaranteed contract. What matters for roto purposes is that Benoit will be getting the saves for Phillies for the foreseeable future, and that makes him pretty valuable in deep NL-only leagues, where saves are only available in the free-agent pool a few times per season. If you need a closer, you should feel comfortable bidding 30 to 40 percent of your FAAB on the veteran.

Ryan Buchter

He picked up a save during the first week of the season, but Buchter isn’t the closer in San Diego. For now, anyway. The 30-year-old is currently the setup man behind Brandon Maurer and managed to pick up that save when Maurer was unavailable after pitching in each of the two previous games. The big lefty piles up lots of strikeouts, posting an 11.1 K/9 last season and a 12.3 K/9 in the early going this season. Maurer is far from a sure thing, so if he stumbles, it wouldn’t be surprising to see Buchter start racking up saves in addition to strikeouts despite the aversion that many teams have toward naming lefty closers.

Kevin Siegrist

A favorite of mine for the past few years, Kevin Siegrist is off to a poor start in St. Louis with a 19.29 ERA and a 3.43 WHIP in 2 2/3 innings after a disastrous outing against the Nationals in which he surrendered five runs in 1/3 of an inning. Walks always have been the most troublesome aspect of Siegrist’s profile and they have hurt him this year, as he has issued four already across three appearances. More troubling is that Siegrist hasn’t been striking out guys like he has in years past, with only one strikeout so far. With only 2 2/3 innings thrown, we probably can’t draw credible conclusions, and the safest bet would to assume that the 27-year-old will stabilize and return to the level he established over the previous two seasons. However, it just might be that I need to stop living in the past and entertain the possibility that one of my favorite non-closing relievers isn’t as good as he used to be.

Other Options: Brad Hand, Hector Rondon, Archie Bradley

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The Brewers fail to put their best foot forward.

Maybe, just maybe, this will turn out to be a significant moment in the history of baseball roster construction:

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The fantasy team tackles questions submitted by you, the readers, via email.

Each Friday, we are going to publish questions from our unofficial mailbag. We find that some of you email multiple members of the staff with the same question, while others hit us up at fantasyhour@baseballprospectus.com. We have decided to share the knowledge, anonymously, with the populous, and allow you to ask additional questions in the comments for the fantasy staff to address.

Keeper league, Profar or Taveras? Does Profar’s position give him the edge or is Taveras's bat that special?

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Which players riding the pine might have a significant say in their teams' win totals?



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One of the catching greats lost his battle with brain cancer on Thursday.

"It's a man's game, but you have to have a lot of little boy in you to play it." —Roy Campanella

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John names ten men who appear poised to join the ranks of major-league managers.

They call it the Silly Season in NASCAR. It is that time right after the stock car season ends, in which drivers and pit crews began jumping from one team to another, the sport's version of free agency.

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Does the Brew Crew's collection of bench has-beens suggest that they've forgotten the lessons of 2008, or are they still in the process of building a contender?

Much as I try to keep track of transactions, there are, at any particular time, a certain number of players dotting major-league benches and bullpens whose existence manages to elude me entirely. Take current Braves third-string catcher J.C. Boscan. If you’d asked me what team he was on, I would’ve had at best a one-in-thirty chance of answering correctly; if I’d known he was a catcher, the odds would have been even worse, since I wouldn’t have guessed that a team fortunate enough to have both Brian McCann and David Ross would feel the need to go three deep behind the plate. As far as I can tell, Fredi Gonzalez wants him around in case Ross starts and McCann pinch-hits for him, which would leave the Braves only one unlikely catastrophic injury away from disaster—making Boscan little more than a security blanket with a catcher’s glove and an unusual goatee.

I managed to miss both Boscan’s lone plate appearance in 2010 (a walk!) and his single plate appearance in 2011 (a strikeout!). Those two no-contact cameos (and a pair of innings behind the plate) compose the entirety of his major-league career to date. In fact, he didn’t even make it into the BP annual, a snub that makes you either a nobody or the 1996 Cardinals. Of course, now that I’ve written about him and associated him with Mrs. Peterman’s dying words, I’ll remember J.C. Boscan to my dying day, even though it would be safe to forget about him as soon as Jair Jurrjens bumps him off the roster this weekend.

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February 10, 2011 1:53 am

Purpose Pitches: Farrell, Mattingly, and Roenicke

6

Christina Kahrl

Baseball's trio of dugout noobs have followed very different paths to their skippering slots, but what does the future hold?

Yesterday's column and my comments about the increasing importance of staff management are my cue to touch on what we do know about the three genuinely new skippers. The first of them is an ex-pitcher with no managerial experience, but someone who will be coming to the job with plenty of management experience.

Blue Jays: John Farrell

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June 29, 2010 8:00 am

Top 10 Week: Manager Prospects

22

John Perrotto

A look at 10 men who deserve the opportunity to be a major-league skipper.

Top 10 Week continues here at Baseball Prospectus as we look at the 10 best managerial prospects in the game. Only those who have never managed in the major leagues on a regular basis were considered for this list, which was compiled with the help of numerous people in all facets of the game.

Dave Brundage
Age: 44
Current Position: Manager of the Braves' Triple-A Gwinnett farm club.
Background: Brundage spent seven seasons as a minor-league outfielder then 14 years working in the Mariners' farm system from 1993-2006, four as a hitting coach and 10 as a manager. He has been a manager in the Braves' farm system the last four seasons.
Why He is Qualified: This is all you need to know about Brundage: Those close to the Braves believe if they stay inside the organization to replace the retiring Bobby Cox at the end of the season that Brundage will likely be general manager Frank Wren's choice. Though Brundage has never played or coached in the major leagues, his knowledge of the game and ability to communicate and motivate would allow him to overcome any experience disadvantage.





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May 5, 2010 6:35 pm

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester

7

Ken Funck

Most teams don't use their final roster spot on guys who are just good in the clubhouse.

The myriad components that make up a baseball team, perhaps the most slippery to isolate and quantify is "team chemistry." Pitching, batting, fielding, speed, power, leadership, strategy, clutch performance, fundamentals, lineup balance, health, luck—each of these, when assembled properly, can make up the DNA of a championship ballclub, and sabermetricians are constantly engaged in a sort of Baseball Genome Project, trying as best they can to tease out and quantify each individual factor. Most of these relate solely to the performance of players between the lines, and it’s here that baseball’s gene sequencers have made the most progress, making their way (as Colin Wyers recently described) toward accurately identifying the relationship between the components of each player’s on-field performance and a team’s wins and losses.

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Roster updates

Latest projected opening-day roster updates as of 1:30 a.m. ET on April 1:

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