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Articles Tagged Bench Players 

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05-14

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4

Overthinking It: The Rangers' Secret Weapon
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-15

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2

Overthinking It: Free the Bench Bats!
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-13

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57

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

04-14

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17

Overthinking It: Baffled by the Brewers Bench
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-30

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12

Ahead in the Count: The Poor Return on Dan Haren
by
Matt Swartz

05-05

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7

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester
by
Ken Funck

02-21

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Jauss
by
David Laurila

10-18

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5

Winter League Preview
by
Carlos J. Lugo

05-17

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32

Prospectus Idol Entry: Tim Kniker's Initial Entry
by
Tim Kniker

08-23

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Rookies and Cycles
by
Nate Silver

05-20

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Prospectus Q&A: Ken Macha
by
David Laurila

04-12

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Transaction of the Day: Roster Reviews of the Easts
by
Christina Kahrl

04-05

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Transaction of the Day: Roster Review of the Centrals
by
Christina Kahrl

04-03

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Transaction of the Day: Roster Reviews of the Wests
by
Christina Kahrl

10-30

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 23-30
by
Alex Carnevale

10-16

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0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

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0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

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0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Roster Reviews
by
Christina Kahrl

10-05

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

08-09

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0

No Bang Off the Bench?
by
Andrew Dolphin

04-28

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0

Prospectus Matchups: Walkfest, 2006
by
Jim Baker

03-20

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0

Future Shock: Managing Expectations
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-22

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0

Crooked Numbers: Value Over Replacement Column
by
James Click

07-14

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0

Crooked Numbers: Subroutines
by
James Click

03-25

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0

2005--Setting the Stage
by
Will Carroll

09-30

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0

Thanks for the Memories
by
Jonah Keri

08-21

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0

Rational Exuberance: A Better Way to Build a Baseball Team
by
Jonah Keri

03-11

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0

World Cup Comes to Baseball?
by
Nathan Fox

02-11

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0

Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

07-02

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0

Casey, TK, Gardenhire: How Does Your Prospect Grow?
by
Steven Goldman

06-07

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 27-June 5, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

10-12

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0

Call It In The Air!
by
Dave Pease

08-01

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0

Transaction Analysis: July 27-31, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

12-01

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0

One Man's Take on the Blue Jays
by
Daniel Rotenberg

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May 14, 2012 11:15 am

Overthinking It: The Rangers' Secret Weapon

4

Ben Lindbergh

He's no Josh Hamilton, but Rangers outfielder Craig Gentry might be better than you think he is.

“I’ve got a chance to be a solid everyday player. In years past, I’ve had to scratch and fight just to try and make the team.”Craig Gentry, February 14, 2012

“That’s what Gentry’s job is, to be a defensive replacement and to play against left-handers. I want to allow him to do his job. … I want him to know what his role is and when that situation [presents] itself, he’s ready to do that.”Ron Washington, April 29, 2012

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March 15, 2012 11:56 am

Overthinking It: Free the Bench Bats!

2

Ben Lindbergh

Several overqualified players might be riding the pine while a pricier, less productive veteran hogs their position on Opening Day, but they deserve to be starting.

Every year, major-league teams spend millions on evaluating and acquiring players from outside their organizations, whether they’re amateurs eligible for the draft, professionals in another system, or foreign or domestic free agents available to the highest bidder. Sometimes, though, a potential source of improvement is already in house and in uniform, overlooked in favor of a more experienced or higher-paid player who’s no longer the best man for the job.

Sixteen years ago, Brian Giles was one such player. Giles was blocked by Albert Belle and Manny Ramirez at the outfield corners in Cleveland, but at designated hitter, only an aging Eddie Murray barred his way. The 40-year-old future Hall of Famer had been productive a season before, but by ’96 he was a year away from retirement and had little left. Giles was ready to replace him. At age 25, he was beyond the age at which most promising players get a long major-league look, but he had only a September cup of coffee to show for his two successful seasons in Triple-A.

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One of BP's co-founders returns to reveal an important amateur draft inefficiency.

Everyone missed on Mike Trout. Don’t get me wrong: Trout was a well-regarded player headed into the 2009 draft, a certain first-round talent. But he wasn’t—yet—a phenom. Everyone liked Trout; it’s just that no one loved him. Baseball America ranked him as the 22nd-best player in the draft. No one doubted his athleticism or his work ethic; a lot of people doubted the level of competition he faced as a high school player from rural New Jersey. The Angels drafted him with the 25th pick overall, and they’ll tell you today that they knew he was destined to be a special player. What they won’t tell you is that they had back-to-back picks at #24 and #25, and they announced Randal Grichuk’s name first.

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Does the Brew Crew's collection of bench has-beens suggest that they've forgotten the lessons of 2008, or are they still in the process of building a contender?

Much as I try to keep track of transactions, there are, at any particular time, a certain number of players dotting major-league benches and bullpens whose existence manages to elude me entirely. Take current Braves third-string catcher J.C. Boscan. If you’d asked me what team he was on, I would’ve had at best a one-in-thirty chance of answering correctly; if I’d known he was a catcher, the odds would have been even worse, since I wouldn’t have guessed that a team fortunate enough to have both Brian McCann and David Ross would feel the need to go three deep behind the plate. As far as I can tell, Fredi Gonzalez wants him around in case Ross starts and McCann pinch-hits for him, which would leave the Braves only one unlikely catastrophic injury away from disaster—making Boscan little more than a security blanket with a catcher’s glove and an unusual goatee.

I managed to miss both Boscan’s lone plate appearance in 2010 (a walk!) and his single plate appearance in 2011 (a strikeout!). Those two no-contact cameos (and a pair of innings behind the plate) compose the entirety of his major-league career to date. In fact, he didn’t even make it into the BP annual, a snub that makes you either a nobody or the 1996 Cardinals. Of course, now that I’ve written about him and associated him with Mrs. Peterman’s dying words, I’ll remember J.C. Boscan to my dying day, even though it would be safe to forget about him as soon as Jair Jurrjens bumps him off the roster this weekend.

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July 30, 2010 8:00 am

Ahead in the Count: The Poor Return on Dan Haren

12

Matt Swartz

The quartet the Snakes received for their ace leads to a few questions about player valuation.

In June, Eric Seidman and I discussed the Diamondbacks’ starting pitchers with some focus on Dan Haren, explaining that he was particularly unlucky. At the time of our article, Haren’s ERA was 5.35 and his SIERA was 3.08. Haren would be the ace of many pitching staffs in the major leagues, and is signed well below market value through 2012, with a reasonably priced option for 2013.

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May 5, 2010 6:35 pm

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester

7

Ken Funck

Most teams don't use their final roster spot on guys who are just good in the clubhouse.

The myriad components that make up a baseball team, perhaps the most slippery to isolate and quantify is "team chemistry." Pitching, batting, fielding, speed, power, leadership, strategy, clutch performance, fundamentals, lineup balance, health, luck—each of these, when assembled properly, can make up the DNA of a championship ballclub, and sabermetricians are constantly engaged in a sort of Baseball Genome Project, trying as best they can to tease out and quantify each individual factor. Most of these relate solely to the performance of players between the lines, and it’s here that baseball’s gene sequencers have made the most progress, making their way (as Colin Wyers recently described) toward accurately identifying the relationship between the components of each player’s on-field performance and a team’s wins and losses.

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February 21, 2010 12:31 pm

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Jauss

1

David Laurila

The Mets' bench coach talks about the duties of his job and the interesting path he took to the major leagues.

When the Mets hired Dave Jauss to be their bench coach, they brought on board a true baseball man. The 53-year-old Jauss has spent his entire adult life in the game, performing a cornucopia of roles for a multitude of organizations. After getting his feet wet in independent ball and the college ranks, the Amherst College grad spent three years as a minor-league manager in the Expos system before moving on to the Red Sox, for whom he served as a first base coach, minor-league field coordinator, bench coach, director of player development, and major-league advance scout. From Boston he went to Los Angeles, where he was Grady Little's bench coach with the Dodgers in 2006 and 2007. For each of the past two seasons, he performed the same role under Dave Trembley, in Baltimore. Jauss, who was hired by the Mets in November, talked about his time in the game during the final month of the 2009 campaign.

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October 18, 2009 2:38 am

Winter League Preview

5

Carlos J. Lugo

A preview of the Dominican Winter League, taking a look at the teams, stadiums, managers, and players to watch for.

The "National Religion" came back on October 16th, as the Dominican League launched its 56th edition. Reliably praised as having the highest level of talent among the winter leagues, one should expect to watch another mix of highly ranked prospects, mid-level major leaguers, a few recognizable American players, veterans looking for another shot, and some major league stars between now and the end of the Caribbean Series in February. The league format has six teams playing a 50-game regular-season schedule, with the four best records advancing to a long 18-game round-robin playoff, and the two remaining best clubs play a best-of-nine final series to decide the league's champion. Without further ado, here's what this season will bring us:

Tigres del Licey (Licey Tigers)
Home: Santo Domingo
2008-09 record: 26-24, fourth place (tied) regular season; 12-6, first place round-robin; beat the Gigantes in the final series 5-0.
Ballpark: Estadio Quisqueya; strong pitcher's park, with a Park Factor of 92.




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Bio: You don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand the nuances of baseball. But it helps!

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August 23, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Rookies and Cycles

0

Nate Silver

Do teams that went without rookies for extended periods of time have something to tell about organizational behavior?

I attend perhaps two baseball games a month during the regular season. I really ought to go to more, because a lot of my column topics come when I'm sharing a couple of beers with a friend and exchanging ideas, enjoying the leisurely pace of live baseball without the distractions of TV or the net. On Tuesday night, I took in the Sox-Royals game with Josh Orenstein of the MLBPA, and one of the subjects that came up was how long a team can conceivably go without developing a rookie.

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May 20, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Ken Macha

0

David Laurila

The former A's skipper sits down with BP.

In four seasons as manager of the Oakland Athletics, Ken Macha led the low-budget A's to a pair of Western Division titles and two second-place finishes. His teams posted a winning percentage of .568, but in the eyes of general manager Billy Beane, it wasn't enough. Citing a "disconnect" between the manager and his players, Beane unceremoniously fired Macha after the 2006 season. Looking to recharge his batteries, Macha is currently working as a pre- and postgame studio analyst for the New England Sports Network (NESN), the Red Sox television network.

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Christina finally catches up and reviews the rosters in the two divisions that always seem to get the most attention.

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