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Articles Tagged Ben Christensen 

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Thirteen years after 'The Anthony Molina Incident," one of the parties is on trial.

Updated, February 2014: In October, Molina entered an Alford plea to two Class 2 felony counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse against an 8-year-old girl. An Alford plea is "a guilty plea... whereby a defendant does not admit the criminal act and asserts innocence [but] admits that the evidence the prosecution has would be likely to persuade a judge or jury to find the defendant guilty." In January, he was sentenced to six years in prison. "With credit for time served, prosecutors say he likely will serve as little as three."

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June 15, 2004 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: A New Low

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Derek Zumsteg

I don't get along with my team. We've disagreed over how the team's been run, from who's been put in the lineup to who's being drafting. Since the ownership group bought the team to save it from possibly moving, they've seemed eager to support Bud Selig and MLB in whatever crazy scheme they come up with. I would bet there are many baseball fans with similarly strained relationships with the teams they support. The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them. The problem is that the M's are willing to do almost anything to get rid of players that fans perceive as having negative qualities or being a problem, while at the same time they're willing to pick up good clubhouse guys with baggage if they think they can get away with it. The Mariners will pick up a guy like Al Martin, who got into a nasty tussle with his backup wife in Arizona, resulting in a lot of counseling and a pinch of jail time. Martin, for his potential legal and character issues, was and remains known for having a great work ethic, an easy guy to get along with on a team, and a good clubhouse presence. The Mariners brought in a bigamist who'd bust up a much smaller secondary wife while running their "Refuse to Abuse" campaign against domestic violence...because they wanted a left-handed bat.

The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them.

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BRAVO!! Thank you for having the guts not to soft-peddle the behavior of this lout. If he wasn't an athlete, he'd be in prison right now... which is exactly where he belongs. Yet another case of preferential treatment for an athlete who might be able to make someone else a few bucks. A fact which, I believe, goes a considerable way toward answering the question, "Is Society Dead?"

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July 23, 1999 12:00 am

Is Society Dead?

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Dave Pease

I'm not one that worries about a lot of the fluff that goes on around baseball in specific, or sports in general. Organizations like ESPN are so desperate for broadcast material that they have no choice but to spend a lot of time and effort blowing things out of proportion. Minor fluctuations in performance become meaningful trends that require explanation. Society is reflected in sport, or so we're told, usually by someone who used to have a prostate.

But I am worried about the recent baseball draft.

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