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Ben and Sam question the conclusions of an article in The Atlantic about racial bias in baseball broadcasting, then talk about whether Brian McCann's best is behind him and whether his down year is the result of bad hitting hitting or bad luck.

Ben and Sam question the conclusions of an article in ​The Atlantic ​about racial bias in baseball broadcasting, then talk about whether Brian McCann's best is behind him and whether his down year is the result of bad hitting hitting or bad luck.

Effectively Wild Episode 30: "Is There Racial Bias in Baseball Broadcasting?/What to Make of Brian McCann"

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What would the BP team do if they were appointed commissioner for a day?

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Will MLB.tv ever make your home team's games available for web viewing?

Living in the future has its advantages. Back when I was a kid, in the late Pleistocene, catching a ballgame remotely meant either watching your local teams on TV or, if you were away from your living room, listening on the radio; maybe if you were very lucky and it was late at night and the ionosphere was aligned just right, you might be able to just barely tune in something that might possibly be Ernie Harwell on an out-of-town broadcast. Today, anyone with $99.99 burning a hole in their credit card ($119.99 if you want DVR-style gewgaws like fast-forward and rewind) can sign up for MLB.tv and watch any game, whether spring training, regular season, or postseason, on their computer, iPad, smartphone, or PlayStation 3—I'm sure that right this moment someone somewhere at MLB Advanced Media is working on an app that will stream hi-def baseball video live to the dashboard display of your flying car, just as soon as those are invented.

Any game, that is, unless it's one involving your local team. In that case, you're still stuck with 20th-century technology, and either tethered to your TV or forced to stick with audio. Any attempt to do otherwise will result in that dreaded message familiar to MLB.tv users: "We're sorry. Due to your current location you are blacked out of watching the game you have selected...."

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With the Fall Classic now upon us, the staff at Baseball Prospectus shares their most memorable World Series moments.

Every baseball fan has a special World Series memory, whether it's Willie Mays' catch, Bill Mazeroski's home run, Brooks Robinson's defense, Kirk Gibson's limp around the bases, or Derek Jeter becoming the first-ever Mr. November. With the World Series opening tonight at AT&T Park in San Francisco with the Giants facing the Texas Rangers, many of our writers, editors, and interns share their favorite memories of the Fall Classic.

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The D'backs' second baseman shares his thoughts on Willie Mays, the Negro Leagues, and the number of blacks in college and professional baseball.

Orlando Hudson has been the Arizona Diamondbacks' second baseman for the past three seasons; prior to that, he manned the Toronto keystone for four years, where he picked up his first of three Gold Gloves. In addition to his excellent fielding, he's a solid offensive presence in the lineup as well, and is hitting .295/.354/.462 with a .276 EqA this season. David spoke to Hudson about the Negro Leagues, about the population of blacks in baseball both on the field and in the stands, and about being a role model for the black community.

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April 29, 2008 12:00 am

Blazing the O'Malley Trail

0

Gary Gillette

The legacy of the Dodgers move west, and setting the record straight on Brooklyn's support of the Bums.

Another problem with evaluating O'Malley's legacy is that many revisionists, consciously or unconsciously, make a big deal out of the Dodgers' Brooklyn attendance, then and now. Disparage the Dodgers' support in the 1950s as a way of rationalizing O'Malley's gambit, they write phrases like "the Dodgers barely drew a million fans" in Brooklyn in the 1950s, as if that were some kind of crime. The fact is that both major leagues in the 1950s were in deep trouble, with overall attendance declining for a multitude of reasons. It is neither fair nor instructive to compare today's attendance, when the US population is double what it was in 1950, with five decades ago unless one also puts those numbers in context. Furthermore, the Los Angeles market of the twenty-first century is more than four times the size of Brooklyn's market in 1950.

The myth of weak attendance in Brooklyn undergirds the popular understanding of O'Malley's inspiration to go west. Despite the misconceptions that have obscured the facts since the move, the Dodgers had drawn better than the NL average (excluding Brooklyn) in every season from 1938 through 1956. Only in 1957, the Dodgers' last year in Brooklyn-and a season throughout which rumors swirled that the team was headed west-did O'Malley's team fall a few thousand fans short of the league mean in attendance.

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May 17, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Moving the Marlins

1

Nate Silver

Nate uncovers the best spot for the Fish to migrate to, should they choose to swim to other waters.

If you build it, will they come? Cities that are attempting to procure a major league baseball team invariably find some way to spin the numbers in the most favorable light possible. I found a 1989 New York Times article in which Buffalo Bills owner Frank Rich, then trying to land a baseball expansion team in his city, claimed that Buffalo was the eighth-largest TV market in the country "when you include Rochester, Syracuse and the Niagara Peninsula." Backers of the San Antonio Marlins can cite the large population of the city proper, ignoring that its media market is decidedly minor league.

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May 14, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Tweaking the Market Size Model

1

Nate Silver

In response to a lot of reader feedback and interest, Nate makes a few corrections to his evaluation of market size.

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May 4, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Defining a Market, Part Two

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Nate Silver

Nate's attempt to determine a market size for every major league team continues, with stats on attendance and television spheres for all the clubs.

I hope yesterday's part one didn't lose you guys, because now for the (comparatively) fun part: our team-by-team breakdown. In addition to the attendance and TV estimates from my model, I have provided a comparison to the Mike Jones figures, and also the raw census data from each team's primary MSA. The numbers in parenthesis represents a team's relative market share (with 100 representing league average) and its rank among the 30 clubs in that category.

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A wild-eyed attempt to arrive at a specific market size for every major-league team.

Are you ready for some geography?

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Will it feed fan passions, or will a business decision cool their jets?

I bring all of this up now because for the better part of a month I have been immersed in research and correspondence with those who will be impacted by MLB's decision to make Extra Innings available only on DirecTV, and also discussing MLB's move with those that work in sports business or cover it from an analysis perspective. With the exception of three emails received, the fans that contacted me are flaming mad with the deal, and wish to still get out-of-market games through the existing carriers like cable and Echo Star's Dish Network, which will be dropped in America when the new deal is announced. (I will get to Canada shortly.)

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February 8, 2007 12:00 am

Caribbean Series

0

Derek Jacques

Derek views the series' conclusion from all the remaining angles.

Now that I'm telling you how lucky and blessed I am, I guess it's as good a time as any to tell you that I didn't cover the Caribbean Series in person in Carolina on Wednesday, but rather from San Juan. The reasons are too boring to share, but on the theory that if given lemons, make lemonade, I took the opportunity to take in some of the televised options for watching the Caribbean Series.

First, briefly, there was the afternoon game, which I wasn't able to catch in its entirety. I tuned into this one using MLB.tv, which had been the topic of a lot of reader e-mail after I asked how the English language broadcasters were doing on Unfiltered. The consensus seemed to be that the father/son team of Victor and Cookie Rojas were all right, and the other team of Felix DeJesus and Eddy Perez were...um, not. Perhaps the most emphatic email I got about the DeJesus/Perez pairing came from reader S.T.:

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