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Articles Tagged Baseball Rules 

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06-05

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7

BP Unfiltered: The Best and Worst Days of the Week for Baseball
by
Zachary Levine

03-07

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43

Prospectus Hit and Run: Inspecting the Spectrum, Part IV: The Designated Hitter Question
by
Jay Jaffe

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-13

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14

Wezen-Ball: Wikipedia & Baseball Around the World
by
Larry Granillo

10-14

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: When 100 Tiles Meets 27 Outs
by
Diane Firstman

06-24

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dodging Cuban
by
Jay Jaffe

05-27

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49

Grumblings from a Surly Sabermetrician: Scott Cousins is a Dirty, Dirty Ballplayer...
by
Clay Davenport

04-29

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9

Baseball ProGUESTus: Fantasy Baseball's Founding Fathers
by
R. Emmet Sweeney

04-18

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8

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part V
by
David Laurila

04-15

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5

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part IV
by
David Laurila

01-28

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24

Fantasy Beat: Keeping Scoresheet
by
Rob McQuown

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

06-28

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12

Top 10 Week: General Manager Candidates
by
Will Carroll

03-07

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Chaz Scoggins
by
David Laurila

10-28

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5

Doctoring The Numbers: When the Rains Come
by
Rany Jazayerli

09-05

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29

Future Shock: The Process and the Grievance
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-16

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0

Future Shock: Agents, the Draft, and the NCAA
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-15

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0

Wait 'Til Next Year: Changes
by
Bryan Smith

09-20

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2

Lies, Damned Lies: The Best Player in Baseball, Part One
by
Nate Silver

09-05

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0

The Big Picture: Raiding or Raising the East?
by
David Pinto

04-11

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0

BP Kings Update
by
Ben Murphy

03-21

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0

Who Are the AL-Kings?
by
Jonah Keri

03-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Passion
by
Joe Sheehan

05-16

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Pete Rose
by
Graham Bensinger

05-11

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Johnson
by
Thomas Gorman

12-08

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0

Steroids in Baseball
by
Will Carroll

08-03

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0

Breaking Balls: More on Rules
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-29

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0

Breaking Balls: Rules Were Made to be Broken
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Competitively Balanced
by
Joe Sheehan

05-07

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0

Behind the Mask Q&A
by
Jason Grady

05-03

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0

Behind the Mask Q&A
by
Jason Grady

04-30

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0

Prospectus Today: Owning Up to the Problem
by
Joe Sheehan

03-04

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0

Under The Knife: A Day in the Life
by
Will Carroll

02-28

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0

Prospectus Feature: The Downfall of Denny McLain
by
Mark Armour

02-28

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0

The Downfall of Denny McLain
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-26

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0

Ending Baseball's Antitrust Exemption
by
Alex Belth

06-04

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0

From The Mailbag: Stadia, Transactions Fun, and Ben Davis
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-27

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0

From The Mailbag: Management, Homework, and Frank Thomas
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-01

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0

Homers and Hormones
by
Rany Jazayerli

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Why Wednesday, dissed in the corporate world, stands alone as the best day of the week for baseball.

Happy Wednesday.

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Pitchers continue to get injured while batting, so should baseball continue to require NL pitchers to hit?

I'm not known around the Internet as the world's biggest A.J. Burnett fan. During last Wednesday's BP roundtable, I even dusted off an old Simpson's riff: "I'm a well-wisher in that I wish him no specific harm." Now, to set the record straight, any voodoo dolls I may have referenced over the past decade or so for any player exist only in my breathlessly hyperbolic narratives, and I would never actually wish injury on a ballplayer, particularly not such an injury as befell Burnett later that day. The recent trade that sent the enigmatic righty from the Yankees to the Pirates mandates that he practice his hitting and bunting, and unfortunately, a less-than-stellar bit of work on the latter sent a ball into his own face, fracturing his right orbital and necessitating surgery. Fortunately, it does not sound as though he suffered a detached retina, which could have threatened his career.

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January 25, 2012 3:00 am

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau

13

Adam Sobsey

Exploring the origins of baseball's unique moral burden, with an assist from Diderot and Jacques Barzun.

Poor baseball. These two words keep running through my mind lately, the way a line from a song gets stuck in your head. Poor baseball. Poor baseball. Oh, pity poor baseball.

It is our beast of burden. We ask the sport to do so much work for us, and when it fails, we beat it mercilessly, often until we are beating ourselves. That is because the work we ask baseball to do is moral, and the punishment for doing it poorly or not at all is severe.

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A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

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A look around Wikipedia's various foreign language entries on "baseball".

One of the more underrated aspects of Wikipedia - once described by someone smarter than me as a "quantum encyclopedia, where genuine data both exists and doesn’t exist depending on the precise moment" it's checked - is it's utility as a translation service, for both standard words and cultural terms.

For example, if I want to know what the Spanish word for "brown" is (I never believed my high school Spanish teachers when they told us it was color café), I can just go to the English page for "brown" and then click Español on the left to find out that the word is marrón. And where else could I learn that the German name for "Where's Waldo?" is "Wo ist Walter?" and that the Danish "Find Holger"? It's a simple idea and it tends to work quite well.

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Exploring the connections between baseball and Scrabble, naming an all-time Scrabble team, and coming up with a baseball variant of the famous board game.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Diane Firstman wanted to be the first female general manager in the Majors, but a degree in Athletic Administration and an internship with the Elias Sports Bureau didn’t bear fruit. So, she toils by day as a data analyst for the City of New York. She was the first “fan” to start a blog over at MLB.COM in 2005, and her “Diamonds are for Humor” was voted “Best Comedic Blog” that year. More recently, she contributed quirky stories and analysis to the “Humbug Journal” blog at Baseball Toaster, had an essay included in the “Lasting Yankee Stadium Memories” anthology, and offered game recaps and offbeat statistical analysis at the “Bronx Banter” site. Her latest venture is her own “Value Over Replacement Grit” blog, which features unusual statistical analysis of everything from player name lengths to players’ Body Mass Indexes. 

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June 24, 2011 12:32 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dodging Cuban

16

Jay Jaffe

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has been named as a potential suitor for taking over the Dodgers franchise, but would he be a good choice?

With his Dallas Mavericks having spared us the sight of LeBron James winning an NBA championship, owner Mark Cuban has been in the public spotlight lately. Given his billions of dollars and his past efforts to acquire a Major League Baseball franchise, not to mention a pair of ongoing ownership sagas in Queens and Los Angeles, it's no surprise that Cuban has been asked multiple times about whether he'd be interested in purchasing some portion of the Mets or Dodgers. While Fred Wilpon has found a minority buyer for the former in David Einhorn, MLB’s takeover of the latter's purse strings in the wake of Frank McCourt's financial chicanery has only amplified the chorus of voices calling upon Cuban to throw his hat in the ring. As a Dodger fan myself, I'd like to see it happen.

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...Unfortunately, the way the game is played has forced him to be that way.

There is no doubt in my mind that on Wednesday night Scott Cousins was guilty of a dirty play. When the Marlins’ outfielder was trying to score from third on fly ball, he made no attempt to reach home plate. As he neared home, he launched himself into Buster Posey’s upper body, apparently having made the decision that his best chance of scoring was to ensure that Posey was forcibly separated from the baseball, and that he himself would be able to find the plate in the confusion that followed.

He was probably correct about that decision, even though, in this case, Posey had already dropped the ball before any contact occurred. Posey was acting the way catchers are currently taught—receive the ball, and then drop to your knees across the front of the plate to block the runner’s access to the plate, while making the tag for the out. In any number of games on similar plays, the catcher does make a clean catch, the runner slides, the catcher’s shin guards hit the ground ahead of the runner’s foot, cutting off his path to the plate, the tag comes does down, and the out is recorded. Cousins’ play, like many before him, is an accepted part of the game today—and an evolutionary adaptation to the behavior of the catcher.  It is what you have to do to beat the catcher’s strategy. As I said before, I have no doubt that it was a dirty play, but baseball has accepted this particular pattern of dirt, and I can’t fathom how any punishment or retribution would be justified in the face of this organizational pattern.

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Taking a trip through time to discover how the game you play today took shape.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

R. Emmet Sweeney is a film critic and fantasy baseball player who writes a weekly column for the official blog of Turner Classic Movies, Movie Morlocks. He has also contributed to Film Comment, Time Out Chicago, IFC News, The Believer, Moving Image Source and the Village Voice. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and the Ford at Fox box set. You can follow him on twitter at @r_emmet.

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Wrapping up a tour through the baseball rulebook with a look at discretionary calls, interference, neighborhood plays, the strike zone, rule changes, and instant replay.

Most baseball fans feel they know the rules, but many of them are actually misunderstood, at least their nuances and technical definitions. Even you are fairly well-versed in the rulebook, a primer never hurts, so BP asked the MLB Umpiring Department about 10 of them. Major League Baseball umpire supervisor Charlie Reliford, a 19-year major-league umpire, and Major League Baseball umpire supervisor Larry Young, a 23-year major-league umpire, provided the definitions and clarifications.

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April 15, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part IV

5

David Laurila

Next up, checking in on the number of outs in an inning, the ground rules, and what can be appealed.

Most baseball fans feel they know the rules, but many of them are actually misunderstood, at least their nuances and technical definitions. Even you are fairly well-versed in the rulebook, a primer never hurts, so BP asked the MLB Umpiring Department about 10 of them. Major League Baseball umpire supervisor Charlie Reliford, a 19-year major-league umpire, and Major League Baseball umpire supervisor Larry Young, a 23-year major-league umpire, provided the definitions and clarifications.

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January 28, 2011 9:03 am

Fantasy Beat: Keeping Scoresheet

24

Rob McQuown

Rob McQuown kicks off the Scoresheet Baseball season with some basic tips and help with keeper decisions.

Welcome to the kickoff of BP Scoresheet! The “cuts” deadline for most leagues is coming up soon, and the Scoresheet forums are buzzing with titles including the words “protect” and “keeper” and “draft”. And with only 13 keepers available in most leagues, these are some tough decisions.

But first, what is Scoresheet Baseball, why is it included under “BP Fantasy”, and how can insights into Scoresheet help in other fantasy baseball contexts?

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