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Articles Tagged Baseball Books 

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04-27

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1

BP Announcements: Trent McCotter Wins Inaugural Greg Spira Baseball Research Award
by
Joe Hamrahi

11-19

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24

Bizball: Marlins Ownership and a History Lesson in Greed
by
Maury Brown

06-06

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48

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Books
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-30

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3

Wezen-Ball: John McGraw & Christy Mathewson: Out-of-Copyright Authors
by
Larry Granillo

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

01-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-17

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76

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Movies of All-Time
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-29

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16

Remembering Greg Spira
by
Dave Pease

12-19

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5

BP Unfiltered: Best of Baseball Prospectus Christmas Contest
by
Dave Pease

12-02

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89

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing Best of Baseball Prospectus: 1996-2011
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-30

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13

The Lineup Card: BP Holiday Gift Guide
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-10

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Interviews with an Indelible Owner
by
Tim Marchman

05-04

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: The GM Starter Pack
by
Gary Huckabay

04-19

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1

Wezen-Ball: Finding Baseball in Project Gutenberg
by
Larry Granillo

03-22

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50

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement
by
Jay Jaffe

02-18

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29

Baseball ProGUESTus: Metafandom, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Superfluous Junk Surrounding Baseball
by
Craig Calcaterra

01-22

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7

BP Unfiltered: Baseball Prospectus SABR Day Summit Official Program
by
Joe Hamrahi

12-16

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23

BP Unfiltered: Baseball Prospectus SABR Day Summit
by
Joe Hamrahi

08-02

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3

One-Hoppers: See You in Atlanta?
by
Christina Kahrl

05-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Dorothy Seymour Mills
by
David Laurila

02-22

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Nowlin
by
David Laurila

08-13

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Prospectus Q&A: Lars Anderson
by
David Laurila

04-13

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Prospectus Q&A: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-28

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0

You Could Look It Up: Smoke'm If You Got 'Em
by
Steven Goldman

01-25

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0

Prospectus Matchups: Baseball on the Bookshelf
by
Jim Baker

08-09

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Bonds Responses
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-17

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Organized Common Sense
by
Dan Fox

11-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Off the Field
by
Joe Sheehan

12-13

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Prospectus Matchups: Random Passages
by
Jim Baker

09-05

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6-4-3: Winter Reading List
by
Gary Huckabay

08-19

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Armour & Dan Levitt, Part II
by
Jonah Keri

07-08

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Prospectus Q&A: Allen Barra
by
Alex Belth

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January 25, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: Baseball on the Bookshelf

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Jim Baker

The national pastime shows up on the printed page in books devoted to other subjects altogether.

A couple of years back, I devoted a column to randomly selecting baseball books from my collection and commenting on passages found therein. I have about as many non-baseball books as I have baseball books, so today I decided to do something different: I would go to non-baseball books and try to find baseball references in them. This proved to be a lot more difficult than I imagined. In fact, given the time constraint between coming up with the idea and my filing deadline and the fact that I have a finite number of books, I only came across four such references. Here they are:

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August 9, 2007 12:00 am

Bonds Responses

0

Baseball Prospectus

The past might be a foreign country, but at the moment, where 756 is concerned, we're still well within its borders. What does the gang think of Barry Bonds' achievement?

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Maury Brown : There ought to be one word that comes to mind when taking in Bonds' place as the all-time home run king. Maybe that word is 'confused.' Or cloudy, muddy, murky... take your pick. In the history of sports, I don't think anyone has ever faced the dilemma of asking whether or not a record was legitimately set or not. Barry Bonds has forced us to look at that issue with arguably the most revered and sacred of records in baseball. After all, the record has been achieved, and controversy be damned, he hasn't failed a drug test, nor has he been indicted by the Feds, nor has some mountain of evidence landed in George Mitchell's lap that makes one think that Bonds is going to be the focus of his soon-to-be published report.

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Dan reviews J.C. Bradbury's new book.

"[Economics] is a method rather than a doctrine, an apparatus of the mind, a technique of thinking which helps its possessor to draw correct conclusions."
--John Maynard Keynes, as quoted in the introduction to J.C. Bradbury's The Baseball Economist: The Real Game Exposed


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November 1, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Off the Field

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Joe Sheehan

Some news away from the diamond got a bit lost in all the baseball last month.

In looking back, there's not as much good material left on the cutting-room floor as I thought there was, so I'm going to skip it. Apparently, I do a better job of leaving the weak stuff behind on a day-to-day basis than I think I do, and yes, you're welcome to treat that sentence as a set-up line.

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December 13, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: Random Passages

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Jim Baker

Jim flips through his massive book collection for some fun and interesting passages.

This amused me, of course. I was working in book publishing at the time and had developed an animosity towards those who didn't read. My logic was that, if more people read, my job wouldn't pay so blessedly little.

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September 5, 2003 12:00 am

6-4-3: Winter Reading List

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Gary Huckabay

One of the best things about being involved with BP is the people you meet. Since we started doing Pizza Feeds a couple of years back, I've been fortunate enough to meet several hundred people who trudge their way to a Feed, all of whom have an intense interest in baseball, and all of whom are very generous with their time and support. It's pretty common for people to hang out and talk after the main event's over. Sometimes, someone will have an in-depth topic they want a long answer on, or they want to talk about available positions with BP or in a front office, or they want to argue with me about Derek Jeter's defense. The most common question I get after the end of the feed is about books. Some recurring themes come up during the evening, and one of them is often: "What skills does a general manager really need?" The question that inevitably follows is: "What books do you think a GM should read when they first get the job?" It's a good question, so I thought I'd make some suggestions here. I'm going to stay away from baseball books, including our own, and focus instead on the first books anyone should they read if they're going to be serious about their business. Many of these books are applicable to a number of industries, but I believe they're particularly relevant to running a major league club. So, in no particular order:

The most common question I get after the end of the feed is about books. Some recurring themes come up during the evening, and one of them is often: "What skills does a general manager really need?" The question that inevitably follows is: "What books do you think a GM should read when they first get the job?" It's a good question, so I thought I'd make some suggestions here. I'm going to stay away from baseball books, including our own, and focus instead on the first books anyone should they read if they're going to be serious about their business. Many of these books are applicable to a number of industries, but I believe they're particularly relevant to running a major league club. So, in no particular order:

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August 19, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Armour & Dan Levitt, Part II

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Jonah Keri

Continuing from Part I of the discussion with Paths To Glory authors Mark Armour and Levitt... BP: Reading about certain teams--the '97 Marlins immediately come to mind--there seems to be a strong preference among some people for teams that build from within instead of buying a pennant. Having covered both kinds of teams in the book, is there a way that strikes you as more effective? Is one way somehow more noble than the other? Levitt: My take is that the aim of the game is to win. As long as you don't cheat, however you do it is fine. Building through the farm system is a good way to do it because it's cheaper. But when (Charles) Comiskey bought Eddie Collins and Joe Jackson in 1914 and 1915, he was taking advantage of the economics of the time; other teams could have done the same, and didn't. I don't feel that one way is the noble way and one way is the evil way. Good organizations will use any and all methods to build a winner. Armour: One reason we chose to write about the Marlins was that history has mistreated them. Some of that is because they went on a spending spree, then won. Then the team was torn apart. They deserved to be criticized for being torn apart. But the way they were built was brilliant. They were an expansion team, and they had the right approach. They built a strong farm system. Then they identified what they needed. They decided they needed a cleanup hitter and third baseman, a left fielder and a starting pitcher. So they got the best player available for each job, Bobby Bonilla, Moises Alou, and Alex Fernandez. It's not that it's not noble to spend and win, just that it's hard. A lot of teams have gone out and tried to spend a lot of money. But it's hard to find three good players to fill three holes, or five to fill five. The Marlins did this really well. Levitt: The problem with modern free agency and buying players that way is that great players often only become available when they're in their 30s. People don't realize that Bonds and Maddux are the best of the free agent signings, and that it's hard to get a real impact player that way, let alone someone like Bonds or Maddux. There's also a lot of thought that buying a bunch of players is a new idea, but it's not. Tom Yawkey in the 30s did it with the Red Sox, and the Yankees also did it in the 30s. Comiskey did it, and so did the Boston Braves in the 40s. The great teams have almost always acquired a bunch of their players through purchases. If you look at a team like the Pirates in the late 40s though, after Bing Crosby bought the team, they spent a lot of money on a bunch of old players, including Hank Greenberg, and that didn't help them at all--they still finished last every year.

Baseball Prospectus: You covered a large number of teams over a period of 100 years for the book. What kinds of research materials did you use to get your information, especially for the oldest teams?

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July 8, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Allen Barra

0

Alex Belth

Allen Barra has written for numerous publications since the late-1970s, including The Village Voice, The Wall Street Journal, and currently The New York Times. In 2002, Barra authored Clearing the Bases: The Greatest Baseball Debates of the Last Century, which took a refreshing look at some of baseball's most argued topics. Recently, BP correspondent Alex Belth caught up with Barra to discuss his early days as a writer, the influence of Bill James on his work, and Major League Baseball's marketing department.

Baseball Prospectus: So what team did you root for as a kid?

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