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Happy Holidays! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 29

Articles Tagged Baseball America 

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05-13

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Dumping Targets, a Look Back
by
Mike Gianella

04-29

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23

Bizball: Baseball's Marketing Problem Isn't Easy to Fix
by
Maury Brown

07-20

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12

BP Unfiltered: Alex Anthopoulos Always Checks His Math
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-13

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33

BP Announcements: Special Events Announcement *Updated July 13*
by
Joe Hamrahi

01-30

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3

Wezen-Ball: John McGraw & Christy Mathewson: Out-of-Copyright Authors
by
Larry Granillo

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

01-18

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16

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-17

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8

Wezen-Ball: Roger Ebert at the Baseball Movies
by
Larry Granillo

01-17

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76

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Movies of All-Time
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-17

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9

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Advantage of Low Expectations
by
M.J. Lloyd

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-13

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14

Wezen-Ball: Wikipedia & Baseball Around the World
by
Larry Granillo

01-11

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: The Best Commissioner of All-Time
by
Derek Zumsteg

12-15

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: PECOTA Takes on Pitching Prospects and Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Nate Silver

12-09

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23

Baseball ProGUESTus: Sunset in Flushing
by
Jonathan Bernhardt and Jarrett Seidler

11-30

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13

The Lineup Card: BP Holiday Gift Guide
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-10

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53

The Lineup Card: Buy Me Some Wontons and Crackerjack: 11 Foods That Should Be Available As Ballpark Concessions But Aren't
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-13

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57

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

08-03

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36

The Lineup Card: 12 Favorite Baseball Songs that are NOT by The Baseball Project
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-29

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10

On the Beat: The Next General Managers
by
John Perrotto

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-10

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Interviews with an Indelible Owner
by
Tim Marchman

05-24

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6

Transaction Analysis: Quad-A Saves the Day?
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-29

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9

Baseball ProGUESTus: Fantasy Baseball's Founding Fathers
by
R. Emmet Sweeney

04-29

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11

Prospectus Q&A: Alex Anthopoulos
by
David Laurila

04-25

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11

Spitballing: Cracking the Scouting Code
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

01-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part I
by
David Laurila

12-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Best of Q&A 2010
by
David Laurila

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-05

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10

Prospectus Q&A: Lynn Novick
by
David Laurila

09-27

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10

Prospectus Q&A: Ken Burns
by
David Laurila

08-28

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0

Minor Issues: A Baseball Life of an Australian, by Tim Cox
by
David Laurila

08-20

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Gift Ngoepe
by
David Laurila

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

07-27

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Julio Borbon
by
David Laurila

06-28

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12

Top 10 Week: General Manager Candidates
by
Will Carroll

06-03

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4

One-Hoppers: Draft Preview: Bibona, Brown, Colon, Larson
by
Stephani Bee

06-03

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1

Manufactured Runs: Everything You Wanted To Know About Run Prevention (But Were Afraid To Ask), Part 2
by
Colin Wyers

05-12

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10

Minor Issues: Living The Winter Ball Experience
by
Tim Kester

05-05

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6

One-Hoppers: Ernie Harwell (1918-2010)
by
Jay Jaffe

03-29

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5

Spring Conversations
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-30

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Justine Siegal
by
David Laurila

10-16

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2

Player Profile: Kendry Morales
by
Marc Normandin

10-09

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0

Player Profile: Scott Kazmir
by
Marc Normandin

10-02

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5

Player Profile: Dexter Fowler
by
Marc Normandin

06-14

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22

Prospectus Idol Entry: Vladimir Guerrero
by
Matthew Knight

05-10

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26

The LatinTalent Market
by
Kiley McDaniel

05-06

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11

Zumaya's Zooming
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-22

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9

Player Profile: Jeff Francoeur
by
Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

11-21

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8

Player Profile: Aubrey Huff
by
Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

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This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

May 13, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Dumping Targets, a Look Back

2

Mike Gianella

Mike uses evidence from 2008 top-prospect lists to evaluate the merits of targeting minor leaguers in "dump" trades.

Most fantasy web sites and other resources do little if any analysis on playing for next year, or what is known less elegantly as “dumping.” Some analysts refuse to even acknowledge that it is part of the game and advise that it is always best to trade with this year in mind and worry about future consequences next year.

In reality, if you’re in a keeper league, you will probably have to give up and play for next year sooner or later. If other teams are building rosters for 2014 around cheap players such as Bryce Harper, Matt Harvey, and Shelby Miller, and you are sitting back while your team languishes in seventh place with little hope of winning, you are not doing yourself any favors.

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April 29, 2013 5:00 am

Bizball: Baseball's Marketing Problem Isn't Easy to Fix

23

Maury Brown

Maury explains the challenges that MLB faces in attracting young and minority fans.

Whether it was the release of the movie“42,” the anniversary of Hank Aaron surpassing Babe Ruth as the all-time home run leader, or one of many articles each year telling baseball it has an “issue,” Major League Baseball decided recently it was time to create a task force to deal with the decline of African-Americans at the highest levels of the game. Baseball, like other professional sports leagues, likes to create this type of task force. It shows that the league cares, and well meaning be damned, is often stocked with people that likely aren’t difference-makers. Recommendations will be made, but they will be around things that don’t get at the heart of the matter, because those things are difficult—if not impossible—to fix.

The “problem” isn’t really a problem in the way that MLB’s task force is likely to look at it. It’s about the change in society, the growth of other sports, the power of television, the internet, how fast players can transition, the growth of other minority groups now playing the game, and, yes, marketing.

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The Blue Jays came very close to exceeding their bonus allotment for amateur draft picks.

Under the terms of the new CBA, teams that exceed their annual allotment for amateur draft picks signing bonuses by more than five percent forfeit their first-round pick for the following year. That's a pretty harsh penalty. Up to five percent, though, they simply pay a 75 percent tax on the overage. That might come to a few hundred thousand dollars, which isn't insignificant, but it's nothing compared to the expected value of a first-round pick. So, to recap: going over by less than five percent: potentially costly. Going over by more than five percent: potentially really​ costly.

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Chats, Book Tour, Stadium Stops

With the 2012 baseball season finally upon us, it's time to announce BP's full slate of interactive events...designed to bring you, our fans and readers, closer to all the action.

Beginning on May 5, we launch our 2012 ballpark tour in St. Petersburg, Florida with the Tampa Bay Rays. From there, the tour continues with confirmed stops in San Diego, New York, Anaheim, Arlington, Minnesota, Kansas City, and Houston. We've partnered with Major League Baseball teams across the country and other great organizations like the Negro League Baseball Museum, The Newberg Report, The Royalman Report, and Royals Authority to bring you a fabulous experience every step of the way. Each event includes a one to two hour pregame discussion and Q & A session with members of Baseball Prospectus, special guests, and baseball operations representatives. Additional activities will be planned for All-Star Sunday in Kansas City.

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A look at five turn-of-the-century books written by baseball stars of the time that are now available on your ebook reader.

I'm always in awe of the digital age we live in. Everything is on demand and at your fingertips. Music, movies, television, video games - they can all be enjoyed anywhere you are almost instantly. Books are the same way, with all the various e-book readers on the market now. In fact, instantly downloadable electronic books are so prevalent that each and every one of us can even read books about baseball written by turn-of-the-century Hall of Famers with just a few clicks of a mouse button.

Currently, there are at least five different baseball books available free on Google Books written by early-20th century baseball stars, including legendary Hall of Famers John McGraw and Christy Mathewson. These books are also available in other ebook stores, but the prices and availability differ.

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January 25, 2012 3:00 am

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau

13

Adam Sobsey

Exploring the origins of baseball's unique moral burden, with an assist from Diderot and Jacques Barzun.

Poor baseball. These two words keep running through my mind lately, the way a line from a song gets stuck in your head. Poor baseball. Poor baseball. Oh, pity poor baseball.

It is our beast of burden. We ask the sport to do so much work for us, and when it fails, we beat it mercilessly, often until we are beating ourselves. That is because the work we ask baseball to do is moral, and the punishment for doing it poorly or not at all is severe.

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January 18, 2012 3:00 am

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon

16

Jonathan Bernhardt

After starring for opposing teams in the Japan Series, Wei-Yin Chen and Tsuyoshi Wada will try to adjust to life in Baltimore and last place, as the Orioles react to the new CBA by plugging their pitching holes with Asian imports.

On November 12th, 2011, as Major League Baseball recovers from one of the most exciting World Series in recent memory, Nippon Professional Baseball begins its own best-of-seven championship: the Japan Series.

Much like MLB, Japanese professional baseball has two leagues—the Central and the Pacific—and much like MLB, the champions of those respective leagues play each other to determine a final champion for the entire season. As NPB has only 12 teams compared to to MLB's 30, however, the playoffs are structured a bit differently; with only six teams per league, NPB does not bother with divisions or Wild Cards—the best three teams in each league make the playoffs, with the league's top seed getting a first-round bye. The second and third seeds play a best-of-three series, and the winner faces the first seed in a best-of-five “Climax Series” that's roughly analogous to MLB's League Championship Series. The winning club from each league's Climax Series is that league's champion and advances to the best-of-seven Japan Series to determine which is the best club in NPB. The Climax Series format was implemented first by the Pacific League in 2004 and then adopted by the Central League three years later. Previously, there had been no real postseason in NPB: the team with the best season record from the Central would play the team with the best season record from the Pacific in the Japan Series, and that was that.

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What did America's premiere film critic have to say about our favorite baseball movies when they were first released?

In keeping with the theme of today's Lineup Card, I've gone back and updated a post I wrote over two years ago. How did America's premiere film critic see our favorite baseball movies when they were released?

The foremost movie critic of the last thirty-plus years has, of course, been Roger Ebert. He's been reviewing movies for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967, and has been synonymous with film for nearly my entire life. Thanks to this wonderful internet-age that we all live in, his entire collection of movie reviews can be found online at his website, rogerebert.com. Using that as a resource, I went through and found Ebert's reviews of a few of the most popular baseball films of the last three decades. How did he see them at the time? Are our memories and feelings tinted with years of nostalgia, or were these movies just as good when they were new? What did people think of them with a "fresh" pair of eyes?


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A look at some of the best (or simply most enjoyable) baseball movies ever made

1) Field of Dreams
To be perfectly honest—and when discussing a movie sewn through with themes of simplicity and the supposed erosion of classic American values, honesty should be required—not only isn’t Field of Dreams my favorite baseball movie, it’s not even my favorite Kevin Costner baseball movie. That, of course, would be Bull Durham, and as both films arrived in theaters when I was in my twenties, Bull Durham’s irreverent comedy was far more likely to strike a nerve than the overwrought sentimentality of Field of Dreams. Enjoying Field of Dreams at that point in my life would have been akin to copping to a fondness for Steel Magnolias. Sure, I made the two hour pilgrimage to the Field of Dreams film location at Dyersville—after all, there’s not much else to break up the drive from Madison to Iowa City—but when I ran the bases and smacked a few batting practice lobs into the left field corn, I did so with a practiced smirk. I rolled my eyes when I overheard comments about how “peaceful” and “pure” the experience was, chuckling at the ongoing squabbles over commercialization between the two families that then owned portions of the site.  I enjoyed myself, reveling in my ironic detachment… until my girlfriend asked me if I wanted to play catch, shattering all my pretension and reminding me that I hadn’t been immune to the film’s melodramatic charms after all.

You see, Field of Dreams may be a Capra movie without Capra, burdened with Costner’s sub-replacement-level Jimmy Stewart, but you can’t deny the power of its Capital M Moment. After ninety minutes of fully ripe Iowa cornball, it’s hard to believe that the appearance of Ray Kinsella’s father and their game of catch could pack such an emotional wallop. It seems completely unearned, but when I saw it in the theater, I teared up—one of only five times a film has done that to me. This was despite (or perhaps because of) the fact that I had a very happy, baseball-filled childhood and didn’t suffer from Paternal Catch Deficiency. What’s more, I’ve had at least a dozen friends or acquaintances tell me they had the same experience of not particularly enjoying the film but welling up during the game of catch. I can’t explain it, and in many ways it’s completely counterintuitive, but it’s true. It happened, and even now I get a little misty just writing about it. Whatever your opinion about Field of Dreams as a whole, it’s hard to deny its ability to get under your skin, and while that doesn’t make it the best baseball movie of all time, it certainly makes it one of the most memorable. —Ken Funck


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Recounting cautionary tales of disappointing prospects past reminds us not to count on the next big thing.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

M.J. Lloyd is the editor of the Angels site Halo Hangout. He previously wrote general baseball nonsense at Off Base Percentage and covered the Atlanta Steam of the Lingerie Football League for Monkeys Throwing Darts. M.J. lives in New Orleans, where he becomes frustrated when trying to explain baseball to drunks. He also wanders around Twitter @MnkysThrwngDrts.

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A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

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A look around Wikipedia's various foreign language entries on "baseball".

One of the more underrated aspects of Wikipedia - once described by someone smarter than me as a "quantum encyclopedia, where genuine data both exists and doesn’t exist depending on the precise moment" it's checked - is it's utility as a translation service, for both standard words and cultural terms.

For example, if I want to know what the Spanish word for "brown" is (I never believed my high school Spanish teachers when they told us it was color café), I can just go to the English page for "brown" and then click Español on the left to find out that the word is marrón. And where else could I learn that the German name for "Where's Waldo?" is "Wo ist Walter?" and that the Danish "Find Holger"? It's a simple idea and it tends to work quite well.

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