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Articles Tagged Barry Larkin 

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The Reds have the lowest payroll of any first-place team, in large part because they haven't had to reach outside the organization for talent. Can they keep it up?

Well, homegrown’s all right with me
Homegrown is the way it should be
Homegrown is a good thing
Plant that bell and let it ring.

-Neil Young, “Homegrown”

Take a look at the Reds’ lineup from last night:





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December 19, 2011 1:45 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders

18

Jay Jaffe

Only one middle infielder passes the revamped JAWS' standards for Hall of Fame induction.

The past year has been a great one for JAWS, the Hall of Fame evaluation system whose creation marked my first contribution to Baseball Prospectus back in 2004 (I didn't name it until the next go-round). In 2011, two overly qualified candidates for whom I've advocated for the better part of a decade were finally elected. In January, Bert Blyleven received 79.7 percen tof the Baseball Writers of America vote, becoming the first player ever to gain entry on his 14th ballot. In December, the late Ron Santo received 93.8 percent of the vote from the Golden Era committee, a bittersweet result given his passing just a year ago but a vindication of what we've known here for years, that he too was worthy of a bronze plaque.

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Looking at players from two defensive positions on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Like ballotmate Roberto Alomar, Barry Larkin and Alan Trammell are overwhelmingly qualified for the Hall of Fame, but didn't gain entry last year. Larkin made a strong showing in his first year on the ballot, one which suggests he'll reach Cooperstown sooner or later, while Trammell continued to receive a puzzling lack of support and watched his odds of election grow even longer. Today, we'll use JAWS to re-examine their Hall of Fame cases, and with just a week until the ballot results are announced, we'll also take a brief look at the backstops on the ballot—catching up, if you will.

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December 30, 2009 2:20 pm

Prospectus Today: Virtual Hall-Worthy Selections

19

Joe Sheehan

Sorting through who belongs in Cooperstown on the new ballot, plus the Mets' splash.

I hadn't realized it until I went looking, but I've been pretty good about doing a Hall of Fame ballot each year. Mock, of course-I'm at least 11 years from having one, probably more, barring eligibility changes-but a fun exercise nonetheless. It can be a challenge to keep it fresh, as there are only so many ways to point out that Bert Blyleven is one of the 50 best starting pitchers in history, would raise the Hall standards for the position, and should therefore be elected.

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Reviewing the qualifications of Tram and Larkin, Robin Ventura, Todd Zeile, and Edgar Martinez.

Having kicked off this year's JAWS series and addressed the Hall of Fame candidates on the right side of the infield on Monday, we can now turn our attention to the left side today. It's a pretty fair crop, to say the least.

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It's a special time of year...particularly if you're Johan Santana.

"It's like when you're waiting for Christmas. You know how the anticipation builds? That's the way he is when he's waiting for spring training. He gets so excited. When you're going to spring training, all things are possible."
--Carol Garner, wife of Houston manager Phil Garner, on how her husband feels about spring training (Houston Chronicle)

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September 29, 2004 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: A Hall of Famer

0

Nate Silver

Barry Larkin plans to come back for the 2005 season, delaying his candidacy for the Hall of Fame by another year. Should he get in once eligible?

Larkin, unfortunately, gets hammered from both ends: he brings out certain detractors who claim that he did not have a strong enough peak, and others who claim that he did not sustain his greatness for a long enough period, citing his recent struggles as evidence. Neither of those claims has much basis in reality.

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July 6, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Breaking Down the All-Star Picks

0

Joe Sheehan

McKeon chose Larkin over Bobby Abreu, a reasonable MVP candidate in a world that just gives Barry Bonds the lifetime achievement award. He chose Larkin over J.D. Drew, who's one of the only reasons to watch the Braves this year. Lyle Overbay appears on a lot of "snubbed" lists, and although I can forgive McKeon for not adding a fourth first baseman or third Brewer, Overbay clearly belongs ahead of Larkin. As does Beltre. Regardless of whether I'd rather see the veteran I like over the disappointment I have no attachment to, choosing Barry Larkin over any or all of these players is a mistake. Based on the established criteria, and even giving Larkin credit for his long and distinguished career, I can't see snubbing players like Beltre and Abreu in favor of Larkin. Still, the All-Star selection process has become a paint-by-numbers one, as the player selections and the various roster requirements fill out the teams without requiring much input from the managers. Maybe we should be thankful to McKeon for adding some spice to the process.

Now, of course, there's both less time and less reason for speculation and debate. With player voting accounting for half of the roster spots, and the requirements that every MLB team have a representative and 12 pitchers be on each team, the All-Star managers don't have much say in filling out the roster. It's hard to get worked up over a decision to take this third baseman having a good year over that one, or this closer-on-a-bad-team over the other. The All-Star rosters are now assembled by a formula, not discretion.

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The Red Sox aren't settling for the Wild Card yet. The Barry Larkin era has apparently come to an end for the Reds. A look at the second tier of young Padres pitchers. All this and more from San Diego, Cincinnati, and Boston in your Tuesday edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • We're No. 2: The Sox announced their presence in the AL East race with authority by taking the first two games of an early-August weekend series in the Bronx to pull within 1.5 games of the division leader. The Red Sox promptly gave back two full games in the next two days by forgetting their bats in the series finale and how to play defense in an opener against the Orioles, while the Yankees handled the Blue Jays. Since then, the Sox have gone 9-4, but the Bombers have surpassed that with a 11-3-1 (thank you, Isabel) stretch, all but securing a second-place finish for Boston once again.
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    September 5, 2003 12:00 am

    They Wuz Robbed

    0

    Mark Armour

    There has never been a season when Barry Bonds was obviously the league's best player that he did not win the MVP award. Were he to lose the award this season (he is currently leading in VORP by 17 runs over Albert Pujols) it would be his first real injustice. If Bonds has not been mistreated by MVP voters though, several stars of the past have been. Although it has been 80 years since anyone has hit like Bonds has the past few years, there have been occasions when a player has dominated his league for several years and been ill-served by the voters. The rest of this article briefly discusses a few of the more famous cases. Ted Williams' problem was that he played in a time when it was difficult to win the award without winning the pennant, and his team finished second every year. From 1941 through 1954, Williams led the league in VORP every season that he wasn't either in the military (five years) or hurt (1950). He won two awards: 1946, when the Red Sox finished first, and 1949, when they finished one game behind. Let's run through a few of the more interesting losses:

    Leaving aside the 2003 race, which is, after all, still ongoing--and which Bonds might very well win--let's turn our attention to how Barry has been mistreated in the past. To begin with, we have to deal with the fact that Bonds has won the award five times, two more than any other player in history. This is not necessarily a contradiction, of course--if Bonds is the best player in the league every year, then the writers have a responsibility to give him the award every year. Given this, how many MVP awards should Bonds have won?

    As you have no doubt gathered, I make no distinction between the "best" player and the "most valuable" player. What could be more valuable than "greatness," after all? The distinction is often used as a crutch; rather than trying to make the case that a candidate is really the best player, one can instead try to cloud the issue with grammatical semantics. We won't do that here.

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    May 30, 2003 12:00 am

    Under The Knife: A Visit with Dr. Tim Kremchek

    0

    Will Carroll

    There is no other hospital I have ever seen that includes its Astroturf infield in the tour. Hidden away just off the Interstate in northern Cincinnati, I was invited to go into, what for me was essentially the mouth of the beast. Swerving through the new construction of a suburban office park, almost anonymous from the outside, Beacon Orthopaedic Clinic beckoned me to come inside, to let my guard down, and to face the man I'd criticized in print more than any other. It was the equivalent of Rush Limbaugh being invited into the Clinton White House. It was Doug Pappas being invited to a Selig family picnic. In my years as an injury analyst, there was no name that had come up more than Ken Griffey Jr.. When speaking of Griffey, there was no way to avoid involving Dr. Tim Kremchek in the discussion. Like many, my opinion of Kremchek had descended from joking derision. My views were colored by incidents which, from the outside, supported my views. More recently though, Reds Assistant General Manager Brad Kullman convinced me to keep an open mind, that I might be wrong about Kremchek. I decided to try and find out for myself.

    In my years as an injury analyst, there was no name that had come up more than Ken Griffey Jr.. When speaking of Griffey, there was no way to avoid involving Dr. Tim Kremchek in the discussion. Like many, my opinion of Kremchek had descended from joking derision. My views were colored by incidents which, from the outside, supported my views. More recently though, Reds Assistant General Manager Brad Kullman convinced me to keep an open mind, that I might be wrong about Kremchek. I decided to try and find out for myself.

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    January 3, 2002 12:00 am

    The MVP Prediction System

    0

    Chaim Bloom

    From 1946 though 1993, National League Most Valuable Player awards could be safely predicted, with only a handful of exceptions, using just a few indicators. Since that time, however, the system has already made three major mistakes (the MVP was not selected as a candidate by the system) and one minor mistake (the tie-breaker selected the wrong candidate). That's four out of eight correct calls, a rate that on the face of it suggests that the system may no longer work.

    In this conclusion to the series, I'll look at reasons why National League MVP voters may be changing how they go about their business, examine the wrong predictions since 1994, and speculate about the future usefulness of the MVP predictor.

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