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Articles Tagged Barry Bonds 

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04-02

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11

Pebble Hunting: Bonds vs. Pedro, and More Fun with Batter-Pitcher Matchups
by
Sam Miller

02-11

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54

Barry Bonds, Race, and Public Perception
by
Lewie Pollis

01-23

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3

Skewed Left: Bobby Abreu, the Phillies, and Other Reunions That Might Make Sense
by
Zachary Levine

01-14

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 364: The All-Hypothetical Podcast
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-03

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16

Pebble Hunting: The Weirdness of Walking Barry Bonds
by
Sam Miller

01-02

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25

Skewed Left: Better Versions of Bad Hall of Fame Arguments
by
Zachary Levine

01-16

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 120: Quantifying PED Effects/Best Farm Systems in Baseball/Roleplaying Trade Talks
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-10

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46

Manufactured Runs: What Hall of Fame Voters are Doing to the Hall of Fame
by
Colin Wyers

01-07

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9

BP Unfiltered: Time to Push the Reset Button
by
Dave Studeman

01-03

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6

In A Pickle: That Blank Expression
by
Jason Wojciechowski

06-21

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10

On the Beat: Who Wants to be the Next Skipper?
by
John Perrotto

04-18

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51

The Platoon Advantage: All Done With All-Time Teams
by
Michael Bates

03-05

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2

The BP First Take: Monday, March 5
by
Daniel Rathman

02-24

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: Big Shoes to Fill
by
Jay Jaffe

04-05

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-24

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0

Prospectus Today: Sign Barry Bonds
by
Joe Sheehan

09-23

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0

Prospectus Today: End of an Era
by
Joe Sheehan

09-21

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4

Lies, Damned Lies: The Best Player in Baseball, Part Two
by
Nate Silver

08-30

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Tilting the Playing Field
by
Dan Fox

08-09

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0

Bonds Responses
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-07

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0

Barry Bonds' Brace
by
Will Carroll

07-18

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0

Prospectus Today: Point of Separation
by
Joe Sheehan

08-15

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: San Francisco Giants @ Los Angeles Dodgers, 8/13/06
by
Derek Jacques

08-04

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0

Prospectus Notebook: Athletics, Giants
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-06

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Wins and the Quantum
by
Dan Fox

09-14

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0

Breaking Balls: Barry, Barry Good
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-14

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0

Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

05-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Best. Start. Ever.
by
Joe Sheehan

03-12

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0

Team Health Reports: San Francisco Giants
by
Will Carroll

09-05

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0

They Wuz Robbed
by
Mark Armour

01-23

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0

Breaking Balls: The Thrill is Gone
by
Derek Zumsteg

01-16

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Dr. Chris Yeager
by
Will Carroll

01-03

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1

The 2003 Free Agent Market
by
Nate Silver

12-05

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0

Breaking Balls: Another Look at Walking Bonds
by
Derek Zumsteg

11-15

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0

From The Mailbag: Barry Bonds, the AFL, and Bob Klapisch Responds
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-30

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Where Have You Gone, Enn Raudsepp?
by
Jonah Keri

10-28

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 14-27
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-26

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0

Internet Baseball Awards: NL Player of the Year
by
Greg Spira

10-04

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Ripoff Tickets + Bad Channels = MLB Playoffs
by
Derek Zumsteg

09-30

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0

The Week in Quotes: September 23-29
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-21

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Notes from Around the Majors
by
Gary Huckabay

07-22

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0

Genetic Disparity
by
Derek Jacques

07-01

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0

The Week in Quotes: June 24-30, 2002
by
Derek Zumsteg

06-13

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0

Breaking Balls: Barry's World
by
Derek Zumsteg

06-13

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0

Breaking Balls: Barry's World
by
Derek Zumsteg

11-07

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0

Staff Ballots
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-18

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Bonds Edition
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-12

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0

Prospectus Awards Balloting
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-23

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0

The Sun Glinted Off His Jewelry as He Homered to Win the Game...
by
Gregg Pearlman

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What would happen if several hitters and pitchers of interest faced each other for full seasons?

As we talked about on Monday, Mike Trout has hit Felix Hernandez very well. After his first-inning home run on Opening Day, Trout is now hitting .441/.447/.794 in 38 plate appearances against Hernandez since being called up to the majors for good in April 2012. The question for the day, then, is this: How well should Mike Trout do against Felix Hernandez?

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February 11, 2014 6:00 am

Barry Bonds, Race, and Public Perception

54

Lewie Pollis

How much has race influenced public perceptions of baseball's PED poster boy?

Lewie Pollis is a senior at Brown University and a former baseball analytics intern for the Cleveland Indians. He also writes for ESPN Insider. Follow him on Twitter @LewsOnFirst.

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Bobby Abreu improbably returned to his longtime team. Why can't these guys do the same?

Since the 1998 realignment—and by the way, it's always nice when your arbitrary endpoint stat starts being interesting in 1947, 1961, 1969, 1973, 1995 or 1998 so you can disguise its arbitrariness—only one National League team has had three position players compile 40-plus wins above replacement (full list here). And now Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins, and yes, Bobby Abreu are together again in Philadelphia, making this one of the more notable reunions for nostalgia's sake, if not any 2014 on-field impact.

Abreu signed a minor league deal with the Phillies this week and managed to avoid most of the snark that usually accompanies such signings of old players. For one thing, even though we're sometimes bad at this (see Young, Delmon) it was just a minor league deal. Also, the Phillies' standard in the public eye for their old signings is low enough that this one looks okay by comparison, and their outfield had a hole to fill. Mostly, I think, it's that unlike Young and some of the other aged relics, Abreu is somebody we actually like.

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Ben and Sam discuss hypothetical questions about Mike Trout, Barry Bonds, Mark Mulder and more.

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January 3, 2014 6:17 am

Pebble Hunting: The Weirdness of Walking Barry Bonds

16

Sam Miller

Why intentionally walking Barry Bonds was unlike most of baseball's statistical trends.

Ten years ago, we all watched something incredible happen: Barry Bonds was walked intentionally 120 times. He had very nearly tripled the previous non-Bonds record. It was the closest our generation got to seeing Babe Ruth’s home run records, to living in those years when Ruth was doubling previous records, doubling entire teams’ totals.

But Ruth’s records become slightly less amazing with the perspective of time. Imagine seeing Ruth hit 54 home runs in 1920: Nobody had hit half as many in the 1900s to that point; the Pirates as a team hit 16 home runs that year; the NL home run king that season hit 15. You can imagine being literally frightened by what Ruth was doing, like hearing the Rite of Spring in 1913. Fifty-four home runs would have certainly seemed like a record that would never be broken. But 10 years later Hack Wilson did it, then Jimmie Foxx, then Hank Greenberg, then Luis Gonzalez. By just 1922, Ruth didn’t even lead the league in home runs; guys in the NL were hitting 40. What Ruth did wasn’t impossible, it was just a few years early.

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January 2, 2014 6:00 am

Skewed Left: Better Versions of Bad Hall of Fame Arguments

25

Zachary Levine

How to go against the saberballot and without making the internet mad.

You probably don’t have to do much guesswork to figure out what my Hall of Fame ballot will look like when the staff puts out its hypotheticals. You’d probably think that as a Baseball Prospectus writer and general citizen of the baseball internet, my ballot would be predictable down to that last spot or two, and for the most part, you’d be right. I’m not far off from the consensus saberballot.

As such, I get a little annoyed when I see an outlandish outlier ballot. But I really don’t want to. I want to banter in a space where contrary opinions are well thought out and lead to good, respectful debate, not dismissal and name-calling. To be frank and overgeneralizing, I hold the opinions for the undeserving candidates and against the deserving candidates to be bad opinions. And that could be as much on me as it is on the opinions themselves.

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Ben and Sam answer listener emails about how much steroids help, the best farm systems in baseball, and how they'd try to negotiate a hypothetical trade.



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Writers didn't want to induct anybody into the Hall of Fame this year, a decision with no small consequences.

The writers struck out looking. They were lobbed a fat pitch over the heart of the plate and they failed to even take a swing at it. Defenders will note, correctly, that it isn’t the ninth inning. But it was the last at-bat of the eighth, and they face an exceedingly difficult challenge in coming back to win this thing.

The biggest takeaway is that there is a sizable contingent of voters who will refuse to vote for any player, no matter how qualified, if there’s the barest taint of steroids on him, up to and including “playing the majority of his career after 1993.” Many will cast this as a referendum on Bonds and Clemens, two of the sports’ greatest stars who ended up in legal hot water over the use of performance-enhancing drugs. But a litany of deserving players, including Biggio, Bagwell, Piazza, and others, have been punished too, with little more than hearsay to incriminate them. This was a well stocked ballot, filled with newcomers with impressive resumes and a handful of players (like Raines and Trammell) who have been sadly overlooked. It’s easy for even a seasoned analyst to find himself having to trim his list to meet the 10-player limit established by the voting process.

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AChange.org petition to ask the Hall of Fame Board of Directors to change their voting process

I know the results from the latest Hall of Fame voting aren’t in yet, but it’s already clear that the process is deeply flawed. It was always imperfect, but its flaws are now deep, possibly mortal. The voting process is not equipped to handle the messy challenges of our day, and the Hall of Fame is suffering as a result.

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Jason goes looking for Hall of Famers and finds none.

The first thing I'd like to do is thank the BBWAA for admitting me to its ranks even though I'm merely a part-time blogger and weekly contributor to a website that has, in the past, had as an implicit mission statement the Association's destruction.

The second thing I'd like to do is thank the BBWAA for waiving its usual 10-year rule whereby one does not acquire a Hall of Fame vote until one has been a member of the Association for a decade. Really, you're too kind.

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June 21, 2012 5:00 am

On the Beat: Who Wants to be the Next Skipper?

10

John Perrotto

A look at 10 new managerial candidates, and a conversation with Mets manager Terry Collins.

The All-Star break is coming into view, yet no managers have been fired this season. In fact, there have been only a few reports of any of the 30 major-league skippers even possibly being in trouble. But it will eventually happen. Some owner will finally get fed up, drop the axe, and his club will begin a managerial search.

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April 18, 2012 3:00 am

The Platoon Advantage: All Done With All-Time Teams

51

Michael Bates

There's not much to be gained by ranking across generations.

I have a confession.  I suppose it’s not a very juicy confession.  But all the same, I feel like I need to confess that I love All-Time teams.  Or, at least, I used to love them.  I used to make them when I was bored in school in the backs of my notebooks.  All-Time Twins.  All-Time Yankees.  All-Time Guys Named Mike.  And I was a sucker for other people’s All-Time teams too.  Babe Ruth made a team of what he thought were the greatest players in baseball history back in the 1930s and named Hal Chase and Ray Schalk to it.  Walter Johnson, and Rogers Hornsby and Ty Cobb published their dream teams too.  Cobb put Buck Weaver at third base, while The Big Train honored both Chase and Johnny Kling.  One of my first baseball books I owned as a kid was an old library book from 1963 that listed Pie Traynor as the greatest 3B in history.  I’d read any of that stuff.

Which is why I was excited to hear about Graham Womack’s All-Time Dream Project, which asked fans to vote on the greatest players in baseball history and got heavy-hitting writers like Craig Calcaterra, Josh Wilker, and Dan Szymborski to write about them.  Graham’s project, which is also raising money to run journalism workshops for kids, is great.  And I don’t want to take anything away from it.  But in the afterglow, Craig wrote about how the results illustrated that we may be overvaluing the past, saying “We get locked into older things first, and it’s that much harder for us to appreciate more recent greatness….  I think [voters] pick Rogers Hornsby over Joe Morgan because their father said he was the best and because the pictures of him are in black and white and, boy, if that ain’t history, I don’t know what is.”  

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