CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Baltimore Orioles 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

07-23

comment icon

0

Raising Aces: Warm It Up, Chris
by
Doug Thorburn

06-28

comment icon

9

Cold Takes: Baltimore's Annual Surprise Party
by
Patrick Dubuque

06-20

comment icon

6

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
Tim Britton

06-14

comment icon

3

Prospectus Feature: 365 Days of a Shortstop Revolution
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-08

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: Tough Guys Tough
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-01

comment icon

2

Transaction Analysis: Only The Loney
by
Jeffrey Paternostro and Bryan Grosnick

05-25

comment icon

2

Transaction Analysis: Return of The Freak
by
Matthew Trueblood, Kate Morrison, Bryan Grosnick, Adam McInturff, Steve Givarz and Christopher Crawford

05-20

comment icon

3

Rubbing Mud: The Quarter-Pole Odds Changes
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-10

comment icon

6

Raising Aces: David Price Is Disconnected
by
Doug Thorburn

04-21

comment icon

0

What You Need to Know: Raisel Iglesias' Deus Ex Machina
by
Demetrius Bell

04-14

comment icon

4

Prospectus Feature: Bad Teams Don't Start 7-0
by
Rob Mains

04-01

comment icon

1

Rumor Roundup: Panda Endangered
by
Nicolas Stellini

03-28

comment icon

2

Rumor Roundup: Battle for Fourth Place
by
Ashley Varela

03-16

comment icon

12

Rubbing Mud: Bring Back the Belanger!
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-01

comment icon

7

Life at the Margins: Things Are Looking Upside
by
Rian Watt

02-26

comment icon

4

Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Yovani Gallardo
by
Doug Thorburn

02-26

comment icon

36

Prospectus Feature: The Status QO
by
Craig Goldstein

02-24

comment icon

10

Transaction Analysis: Fowler Comes in Under Budget
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-24

comment icon

3

Winter Is Leaving
by
Doug Thorburn

02-22

comment icon

2

Transaction Analysis: Yovani Comin'
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-02

comment icon

0

Rumor Roundup: Staying in Searage
by
Daniel Rathman

02-02

comment icon

9

Prospectus Feature: The Legal Dispute That's Costing the Nats Millions Won't End
by
Samuel Mann

01-18

comment icon

6

Transaction Analysis: Restocking the Orange Crush
by
Bryan Grosnick and George Bissell

01-18

comment icon

4

Rubbing Mud: Deferred Preferred
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-14

comment icon

2

Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Wei-Yin Chen
by
Doug Thorburn

12-17

comment icon

6

Pitching Backward: The Rise of the LiRPA
by
Jeff Long

12-07

comment icon

7

An Agent's Take: The Good Part of Being Traded
by
Joshua Kusnick

12-07

comment icon

2

Rubbing Mud: Opposite Ways on the B-W Parkway
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-04

comment icon

1

BP Unfiltered: 'It's nearly useless'
by
Jeff Long

12-03

comment icon

3

Players Prefer Presentation: Longing for FanFests
by
Meg Rowley

12-01

comment icon

7

Pitching Backward: The Bundy Conundrum
by
Jeff Long

11-23

comment icon

0

Rumor Roundup: What a Lovely O'Day
by
Daniel Rathman

11-19

comment icon

6

Baseball Therapy: What Should the QO Number Be?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-13

comment icon

0

Ducks on the Pond: The Baltimore Hack
by
Chris Mosch

09-30

comment icon

0

The BP Wayback Machine: Young Birds Taking Wing
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-21

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: All's Well That Ends Wel
by
R.J. Anderson and Christopher Crawford

05-14

comment icon

3

Release Points: We've Been Getting Cutters All Wrong
by
Dan Rozenson

05-06

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: No Way
by
Daniel Rathman

04-30

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: Silence!
by
Daniel Rathman

04-20

comment icon

8

Rubbing Mud: So You Want to Trade Your Draft Pick
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-13

comment icon

2

Transaction Analysis: Sounds the Knuckleballer Alert
by
R.J. Anderson

03-26

comment icon

2

Every Team's Moneyball: Baltimore Orioles: Unearth
by
Jeff Long

03-25

comment icon

4

Painting the Black: Getting Personal
by
R.J. Anderson

03-18

comment icon

3

Rumor Roundup: Experts: Matt Wieters Can Squat
by
Daniel Rathman

03-06

comment icon

1

Transaction Analysis: All the Reliever News That's Fit to Print
by
R.J. Anderson

02-20

comment icon

5

Transaction Analysis: Happily Everth After
by
R.J. Anderson

02-12

comment icon

14

Skewed Left: Quoth PECOTA "Nevermore"
by
Zachary Levine

02-05

comment icon

2

Transaction Analysis: An Ax To Sign
by
R.J. Anderson

02-05

comment icon

4

Going Yard: How Chris Lost His Crush
by
Ryan Parker

01-30

comment icon

6

Transaction Analysis: Big Giant Snider
by
R.J. Anderson, Tucker Blair and Jeff Quinton

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 14, 2016 6:00 am

Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Wei-Yin Chen

2

Doug Thorburn

Wei-Yin Chen throws strikes, repeats his delivery and costs a lot.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 17, 2015 6:00 am

Pitching Backward: The Rise of the LiRPA

6

Jeff Long

Also, the introduction of "the LiRPA."

In 2015, 137 pitchers threw at least 48 2/3 innings in relief. Of those 137 pitchers, Fernando Rodney was 134th in terms of RE24[i] , pitching roughly 10 runs worse than the average reliever in baseball. Despite being objectively awful, Rodney had the 11th highest inLI—the leverage of the situation when he entered—of those same 137 relievers. Rodney notched 16 saves as the Mariners closer before ending up in Chicago, where he was surprisingly dominant for a handful of innings at the end of the year. But in Seattle, Rodney’s track record and closer job title garnered him plenty of high-leverage innings despite his being one of the worst possible options to pitch them.

Luckily, Rodney didn’t lead the team in inLI. That honor goes to Carson Smith, whose 2.11 inLI was actually the highest in baseball among qualifying relievers. Smith was a much more worthy recipient of those pivotal innings as he posted an 11.7 RE24, making him one of the better relief pitchers in the game last season.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 7, 2015 6:00 am

An Agent's Take: The Good Part of Being Traded

7

Joshua Kusnick

Sometimes, bad news means a good opportunity.

The winter meetings start today, and besides preparing for that I’ve had a lot going on: K-Rod was traded, so Jeremy Jeffress is in the mix to be the closer in Milwaukee; Seth Lugo was added to the 40-man roster, and Carlos Asuaje was part of the Craig Kimbrel deal. I had three free agents signed (Jiwan James, Jaye Chapman, and Jim Miller). Which is all to say I haven’t had much time to write, but sometimes the topics write themselves. This one is about Steve Clevenger and the week he has had.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 7, 2015 6:00 am

Rubbing Mud: Opposite Ways on the B-W Parkway

2

Matthew Trueblood

The Nationals and Orioles go into the Winter Meetings with very different outlooks, but both might be looking to make a grand gesture.

Heading into the Winter Meetings, the two teams I can’t help looking at over and over are the mystery men of the MASN market. The Orioles and Nationals are in fascinating positions. Going into the offseason, I was ready to push for Baltimore to begin a rebuild in earnest, while touting the Nationals as perhaps the non-division winner most likely to win their division in 2016. So far, though, a strange break and a few bizarre decisions have pushed the two teams toward each other, in a number of ways.

Both teams, of course, are built around a total superstar with three years of team control remaining, but the similarities between them roughly end there. The Nationals remain a deep organization, ready to plug the departures of Jordan Zimmermann, Doug Fister, Denard Span, and Ian Desmond this winter with the likes of A.J. Cole, Joe Ross, Michael Taylor, and Trea Turner, and with more talent on the horizon. The Orioles’ farm system is so thin that they dealt for Mark Trumbo (at an anticipated price tag of $9 million or so) instead of waiting to see whether they could re-sign Chris Davis. In addition to Davis, Baltimore will bid adieu to Wei-Yin Chen this winter, and six weeks ago, they looked poised to really clean up. Davis and Chen will both bring the Orioles sandwich-round picks after the first round, and they figured they would be able to claim a third after they made Matt Wieters a qualifying offer in the first week of November. There was at least some argument that they ought to have given Darren O’Day one of those, too, but they elected not to.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

A bit more on Dylan Bundy's slide.

In the process of researching for my recent article on Dylan Bundy’s injuries and development I was able to get some quotes from Kyle Boddy of Driveline Baseball that didn’t make the final piece. While they weren’t published with the article, I felt they were important to provide context around how Kyle trains players at his facility, and what his thoughts were more generally around mechanical tweaks.

Read the full article...

On the ways we get close.

The offseason has many milestones. Winter Meetings kick off next week. Free agents will come and go, finding homes and new uniforms. Rosters will begin to take shape. And come the darkest winter days, when all that remain are the last gasps of football and a seemingly interminable NBA season, stadiums across the league will open their doors to celebrate FanFests.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 1, 2015 6:00 am

Pitching Backward: The Bundy Conundrum

7

Jeff Long

Baltimore has limited options for the former best pitching prospect in baseball.

It’s hard to imagine the level at which Dylan Bundy dominated the high school competition in Oklahoma. As a sophomore he was named Gatorade State Player of the Year in Oklahoma—an award he would win in his junior and senior seasons as well. As a junior he threw in the 17u WWBA National Championship, hitting 96 mph. That junior year was his first at Owasso High School, a team that would play in back-to-back state championship games thanks to Bundy’s work on the mound and in the field.

But his senior campaign was the pièce de résistance. He threw 78 innings, during which he struck out 158 and walked four. His earned run average was 0.25. He reportedly allowed two or more hits in only four of his 11 starts. His senior season was good enough to make him the first baseball player to win Gatorade Athlete of the Year. He was also named the Baseball America High School Player of the Year, USA Today National Player of the Year, 2011 Louisville Slugger Player of the Year, The National High School Coaches Association Player of the Year, and the National High School Baseball Coaches Association Player of the Year.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

In which a writer puts Joe Panik for Shelby Miller in your head, for no good reason; in which Dallas Keuchel pines for South Texas real estate; and in which Darren O'Day is the lead.

Everyone is interested in Darren O’Day
Well, almost everyone. Close enough to everyone that O’Day should be able to get just about whatever he wants on the open market, where the decreasing fascination with closers should reward one of the majors’ best setup men with money previously reserved solely for those who work the ninth inning.


Read the full article...

Spoiler: It's not $15.8 million.

Baseball has been trying to figure this problem out since free agency began. Baseball players are free actors and may sign with whomever they choose—and that usually corresponds to whoever happens to offer the most money. Some teams have more money than others. How to keep the big money *cough*Yankees*cough*Dodgers*cough* teams from simply buying championships and ruining all the fun for everyone else?

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 13, 2015 6:00 am

Ducks on the Pond: The Baltimore Hack

0

Chris Mosch

The Orioles had just as much of an offensive profile as the Astros and Royals did.

This past season we heard a lot about a handful of teams that constructed their lineups with clear offensive philosophies in mind. The Royals were filled top-to-bottom with hitters who boasted premium contact skills. The Blue Jays loaded their lineup with right-handed boppers. The Cubs and Astros were littered with players with serious swing-and-miss but massive power. Those four teams all shined in the spotlight on their road to the playoffs. However, there was another lineup in baseball this year that flew under the radar with a more subtle uniformity.

The Orioles offense didn’t capture nearly as much attention, largely because their productivity dropped off after losing Nelson Cruz and Nick Markakis to free agency last offseason. Cruz had a monster 2014 campaign that simply couldn’t be replaced and Markakis’ consistent league-average production was sorely missed. The revolving door in the corner outfield spots—which included cameos by Nolan Reimold, Travis Snider, Steve Pearce, Alejandro De Aza, Delmon Young, David Lough and Gerardo Parra—simply didn’t cut it. The Orioles went from the fourth-best offense in baseball by TAv in 2014 to 25th by the same metric in 2015.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Revisiting the Arrieta class of pitching prospects in Baltimore.

Yesterday, Jeff Long wrote about the Orioles' disappointing performance with pitching prospects. Today, we flash back to 2009, when the Orioles' stable of young pitching talent seemed to have the club prepped for a long run of success. The following article by Kevin Goldstein originally ran on July 7, 2009.

While the Orioles' offense ranks 10th in the American League in runs scored, it's still loaded with young talent that's only going to get better from here. Beyond the quality of the competition, the real reason that Baltimore is languishing in the American League East is a pitching staff that is allowing nearly five-and-a-half runs per game. But will they get better in the same way that the offense is expected to? Looking at the current staff, the answer is clearly 'no,' but the magic prospect 8-ball sees one of the more talented collections of mound talent around down in their farm system. It's a group that could be the second part of a rebuilding process that brings respectability, if not much more, back to Charm City.

Read the full article...

Welington Castillo heads north by northwest, while the Astros acquire international bonus slots for a minor prospects.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>