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Articles Tagged Ballpark Music 

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Baseball teams don't always choose wisely when it comes to the music they play at the ballpark.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Riley Breckenridge has spent the past 14 years traversing the globe and making (mostly) loud noises with the band Thrice. He was born and raised a California/Anaheim/Los Angeles Angels fan and gave up on aspirations of playing professionally after his junior year of college, when he realized that his inability to hit anything other than a fastball was not a trait that scouts found endearing. He is also “the other guy” from @ProductiveOuts.
 


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Lou Gehrig put out less often than he made out, getting on base in the batter's box helps you get on base in the bedroom, taking a girl to a game is the best way to beat birth control, and other lessons I learned from old-timey baseball songs. (Caution: some adult themes.)

Baseball and sheet music. Put them together, and the very words conjure images of taking in an afternoon affair at the ballpark with one's nearest and dearest before retiring to the parlor and gathering 'round the piano for the latest in Victorian after-dinner entertainment.* What could be more wholesome?

Everything, apparently. The following songs, unearthed on a trip through the Library of Congress' online Performing Arts Encyclopedia, are dirty enough to make one wonder why it was that Nelly Kelly** loved baseball games, and—even more suspiciously—how she came to know all the players' names.

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A treasure trove of archived video fosters appreciation for the wit and wisdom of the late, great Bill Veeck.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Tim Marchman writes about sports and can be reached at tlmarchman@gmail.com.

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Trevor Plouffe on music in the clubhouse

For fans, baseball offers an escape from everyday life. For players, baseball is their life, so they seek other diversions, both in the clubhouse and away from the ballpark. Trevor Plouffe, a 23-year-old infielder in the Twins system, likes to escape the daily grind with his guitar.

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February 22, 2009 1:01 pm

Prospectus Q&A: George Thorogood

11

David Laurila

A famous rocker talks about one of his other great loves beyond music: baseball.

There are baseball fans, and then there is George Thorogood. An icon in the music world, Thorogood is not only a passionate Mets fan, he is also a walking-and-shouting baseball historian. A former second baseman with the semi-pro Delaware Destroyers, Thorogood has multiple gold records to go with his baseball pedigree, not to mention a reputation as one of the best live performers on the blues-and-rock circuit. About to hit the road for yet another tour, Thorogood shared his thoughts on performance-enhancing drugs, the brilliance of Sandy Koufax, and what it was like to talk baseball with the legendary John Lee Hooker.

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February 22, 2009 12:41 pm

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Nowlin

0

David Laurila

In today's music man two-fer, we run around the bases with the co-owner of Rounder Records.

When the subjects are baseball and music, Bill Nowlin is about as knowledgeable as they come. The Vice President of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), Nowlin is also a co-owner of both Rounder Books and Rounder Records, the latter of which produced the 2009 Grammy Award-winning collaboration between Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. The author of over 20 books on baseball, Nowlin also serves as the publications editor for the Ted Williams Museum.

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October 6, 2008 4:32 pm

Playoff Diary

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Christina Kahrl

A first-timer's trip to the postseason.

Forgive me a second, as I doff the analyst's cap. As is, I lack the gifts of a Silver or a Sheehan, or a Davenport, Fox, or Woolner. Instead, bear with me as I simply go over a trip to the ballpark yesterday. One that just happened to be in an October, and one that just happened to be in my favorite place, Chicago.

In a long life as a fan and a somewhat shorter career as a writer, there are many things I've done, but many things I still had yet to do. While I have caught a foul ball (promptly handed off to the nearest kiddo), and made the trek to the Cactus League a couple of times for spring training, I haven't seen a no-hitter in the flesh, for example. Obviously, some things are not like others—random luck can put you in the right seat and/or at the right ballgame, while time and/or money can put you in Phoenix in February or March, or at a playoff game in October. Even so, I had yet to experience a post-season ballgame in the flesh. That changed yesterday, courtesy of the White Sox, as the always-crisp crew of Scott Reifert in Communications and Media Relations played host to the Fourth Estate for Game Three of their ALDS, and generously made space for Nate Silver, Kevin Goldstein, and myself among the ranks of the chattering classes.

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August 17, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: A Book That Never Was

0

Jim Baker

Jim digs through his personal archives and comes up with some arcane baseball trivia.

I was looking at some old files and found a book proposal that my friend Pete Fornatale and I did a couple of years ago. It was a very nice book proposal, but one that, unfortunately, did not result in an actual book at that time. It was Pete's idea, actually; a follow-up to a similar book he had done on poker. Like the poker book, this was to be a small-format publication intended for placement at bookstore counters for point-of-purchase sale. Each page was to contain some fun factoids about baseball; some of these would have been things the reader might need for quick reference, like a listing of all the championship teams, or all the different ways a batter could reach first base. Others were more arcane and/or amusing, and I thought I'd share some of those with you today.

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February 7, 2007 12:00 am

Caribbean Series

0

Derek Jacques

There's still another day of baseball left to be played, but this Series has already crowned a champion.

My travels around the ballpark started in the upper deck, on the right field side. Through the third inning, the upper deck was only sparsely populated. The crowd kept arriving fairly steadily throughout the first game, although even at the end of the first game there were still a ton of good seats available.

All the sightlines from the upper deck were very good. The deck was not so steep as to induce vertigo, and the seats were nice with adequate leg room. The stadium is small enough that you really don't have any bad seats in the house. Despite the fact that the ballpark was mostly empty when something happened-Vinny Castilla's RBI single in the second, Jose Fernandez's solo homer in the third-the applause, music, and other assorted sounds of the fans filled the stadium.

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