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Articles Tagged Bad Umpiring In Baseball 

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07-09

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26

Out of Left Field: Ending the Empire
by
Matthew Kory

02-01

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42

The Lineup Card: 10 Undeservedly Obscure Baseball Films
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-30

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A New Take on Plate Discipline--Redefining the Zone
by
Matt Lentzner

07-07

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14

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports
by
Michael Street

05-11

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16

Wezen-Ball: Conflicting Feelings About Instant Replay
by
Larry Granillo

03-22

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50

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement
by
Jay Jaffe

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

12-16

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66

Prospectus Today: You Say You Want a Revolution?
by
Joe Sheehan

12-16

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24

On the Beat: Midweek Update
by
John Perrotto

10-25

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9

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

10-21

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87

Prospectus Today: The Horror
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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42

Prospectus Today: A Triple Play of Division Series Post Mortems
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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2

The Week in Quotes: October 5-11
by
Alex Carnevale

10-11

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5

On the Beat: Post-season Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

10-07

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46

Prospectus Today: Who Can Say No to Twins?
by
Joe Sheehan

08-11

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66

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantages, Part One
by
Matt Swartz

07-28

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33

Changing Speeds: A Fox Screen Test
by
Ken Funck

06-28

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50

Prospectus Idol Entry: The Doldrums
by
Ken Funck

05-27

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6

On the Beat: Bouncing Back
by
John Perrotto

05-06

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7

On the Beat: A Red Scare?
by
John Perrotto

10-30

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45

Prospectus Today: The Champions
by
Joe Sheehan

09-07

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8

Every Given Sunday: Scoops of all Sizes from Around the Major Leagues
by
John Perrotto

08-31

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3

Every Given Sunday: Moving Forward to Rewind
by
John Perrotto

08-10

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0

Every Given Sunday: Waiving Good-bye?
by
John Perrotto

12-23

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Willie Horton
by
David Laurila

10-05

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0

6-4-3: Weighin' in at 19 Stone, Part Two
by
Gary Huckabay

10-02

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0

Prospectus Today: The Men in Black Attack
by
Joe Sheehan

07-27

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Fixing It
by
Nate Silver

07-02

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0

Watching the Detectives
by
Mike Carminati

06-18

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0

Watching the Detectives
by
Mike Carminati

06-04

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0

Watching the Detectives
by
Mike Carminati

04-02

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0

The Week in Quotes: March 27-April 2
by
Alex Carnevale

02-06

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0

Caribbean Series
by
Derek Jacques

10-18

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0

Prospectus Today: Decisions
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-02

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0

The Week in Quotes: September 25-October 2
by
Alex Carnevale

09-12

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: Detroit Tigers @ Minnesota Twins, September 10, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

05-02

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0

Prospectus Hit List: Week of April 30
by
Jay Jaffe

05-01

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0

You Could Look It Up: Why Baseball Is Obligated to Throw the Book at Delmon Young
by
Steven Goldman

04-28

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0

Prospectus Today: It's Friday, So It Must Be...
by
Joe Sheehan

12-19

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0

The Week in Quotes: December 12-18
by
John Erhardt

10-26

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0

Prospectus Today: Almost Over
by
Joe Sheehan

10-20

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0

Prospectus Today: The Ride Continues
by
Joe Sheehan

10-17

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0

Prospectus Today: The Last Doubleheader
by
Joe Sheehan

09-21

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0

Prospectus Today: I (Heart) Baseball
by
Joe Sheehan

10-19

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0

Prospectus Today: Wow!
by
Joe Sheehan

10-11

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0

Prospectus Today: Then There Were Five...
by
Joe Sheehan

10-22

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0

Prospectus Today: Game Three
by
Joe Sheehan

09-18

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Arizona Diamondbacks, Kansas City Royals, Philadelphia Phillies
by
Baseball Prospectus

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July 9, 2012 9:21 am

Out of Left Field: Ending the Empire

26

Matthew Kory

More replay in baseball is evitable. As evidence, we have Bud Selig's latest unconvincing argument.

With the All-Star game upon us, it’s a good time to take a look at the state of the game. So, on the pulse of things as always, that’s exactly what commissioner Bud Selig did. He pontificated about a number of topics last week, but the one that stood out was his brief discussion of instant replay. Here’s Commissioner Bud on the expansion of instant replay in baseball (via Paul Casella of MLB.com)

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A look at some of the most underrated baseball films in cinematic history.

1) Bad Lieutenant
Bad Lieutenant is Harvey Keitel at his most intense. He's a drunk, a drug addict, a degenerate gambler, an unfaithful man, a sadist, and in every way among the worst human beings ever portrayed on film. He has countless enemies, from drug dealers to rapists to bookies he owes money to, but there is one that bothers him most of all. That person is Daryl Strawberry. Among the biggest of many weights dragging down on Keitel is his gambling debt, which he tries to eliminate by constantly going double-or-nothing on a fictional playoff series between the Mets and the Dodgers. After the Dodgers win the first three games of the series, Keitel continuously bets on the Dodgers to put the series away, and time and time again it's Strawberry, who in real life joined the Dodgers in 1991, who ruins his game and ultimately his bet. I've always wondered if Strawberry has seen the movie, as Keitel (his character's name is never revealed) rampages against him in ways that seem far more personal than any crowd simply chanting DAAAAA-RYL. It would disturb me. Hell, it would disturb anyone. —Kevin Goldstein

2) The Fan
The Fan is a delightfully creepy movie which features Wesley Snipes as a baseball player (how original!) and Robert DeNiro as a really angry, creepy guy (also very original!) named Gil. Snipes plays an outfielder named Bobby Rayburn who signs a big contract to join the San Francisco Giants and soon becomes DeNiro’s obsession. DeNiro quickly becomes the Pedro Gomez to Snipes’s Barry Bonds in San Francisco, tracking his every move on and off the field from a distance. I’m somewhat surprised that this movie isn’t listed among the pantheon of baseball cinematic classics, considering it has some of the best scenes in cinematic history. These include, but are not limited to: Gil killing another player on the Giants because he wouldn’t give Rayburn his lucky number, Gil kidnapping Rayburn’s son and then killing a man with an aluminum bat for helping the child escape, and at one point someone yells “HE’S CALLING FROM INSIDE THE STADIUM!” which is just wonderful.



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Is the traditional strike-ball dichotomy too simplistic?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Matt Lentzner has carved out a (very) small niche in the baseball analysis world by examining the intersection of physics and biomechanics. He has presented at the PITCHf/x conference in each of the last two years and has written articles for The Hardball Times, as well as a previous article for Baseball Prospectus. When he’s not writing, Matt works on his physics-based baseball simulator, which is so awesome and all-encompassing that it will likely never actually be finished, though it does provide the inspiration for most of his articles and presentations. In real life, he’s an IT Director at a small financial consulting company in the Silicon Valley and also runs a physical training gym in his backyard on the weekends.

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July 7, 2011 9:00 am

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports

14

Michael Street

In his fourth column in the Asian Equation series, Michael looks at the starting pitchers who have crossed the Pacific, in which many failures are punctuated with a few very notable successes.

In the flood of players coming from Japan, the majority (34 of 43) have been pitchers. Unlike the pursuit of the next Ichiro I described in my previous column, this has less to do with the success of Hideo Nomo than it does with the pitching market–pitching is a difficult commodity to find in any league. What has doomed many NPB starters in MLB, however, has been both talent and adjustment to a different pitching philosophy. To understand and explain the differences between the two, I’ve drawn not only on my own expertise, but relied on Japanese pitching expert Patrick Newman at NPB Tracker for additional insight.

Pitching differences reflect a deeper philosophical difference between Japanese and American baseball. As I discussed in my first Asian Equation column, Japanese culture appreciates baseball’s emphasis on discipline, sacrifice, and the dramatic showdown between pitcher and batter. Instead of putting a batter away quickly, NPB pitchers build tension by indiscriminately filling counts before a perfectly placed strike three resolves the battle. These aren’t seen as “wasted” pitches, instead reflecting the samurai-like virtues of endurance and dramatic battles.

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Some thoughts on the pros and cons of instant replay.

Umpires are terrible, right? 

Well, no, not really. But listen to fans in Boston or Tampa Bay or Anaheim or Minnesota or pretty much any other major league city and they'll tell you they are. Recent blown calls - some minor, some major - in those cities can't help but give the everyday fan that opinion. With 24-hour talk radio, high profile cable shows like Sportscenter, Baseball Tonight, MLB Tonight and others, official team blogs and websites, and a countless number of fan blogs all there to analyze any and every movement on the field, a blown call can reverberate like never before. Umpires can turn into household names - for all the wrong reasons - overnight. It's not an easy job.

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March 22, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement

50

Jay Jaffe

Contrary to what you might hear from more retrograde members of the baseball establishment, sabermetrics and storytelling don't have to be at odds.

As Opening Day approaches, hope springs eternal all around the majors. Some teams' bids at contention are founded upon the presumed maturation of exciting youngsters. Others rest their hopes on their stars' ability to turn back the clock and play as though their time had never passed. You could be forgiven for thinking that the latter was the strategy of the Anti-Sabermetric Brigade, a constellation of writers who insist upon fighting a war that has been fought and largely settled. Yet, signs of their resurgence keep popping up.

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Examining umpire calling and catcher framing leads to thought-provoking questions about the amorphous nature of the strike zone.

Ever since the PITCHf/x system debuted in the 2006 playoffs, people have been interested in what it says about the strike zone that the umpires call.

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December 16, 2009 2:58 pm

Prospectus Today: You Say You Want a Revolution?

66

Joe Sheehan

Bud Selig's latest blue ribbon committee is doomed to fail, but maybe that is its objective.

As I write this, it's becoming just a little bit suspicious that nearly two days after they presumably "happened," neither of the two huge trades the Phillies made have actually come to fruition. The Phillies have apparently negotiated an extension with Roy Halladay, and physicals are being taken, but there have been no actual announcements, and as I write this on Wednesday afternoon, with a piece on the trade burning a hole in my hard drive, it's just starting to feel a little weird. The deal has been "imminent" for about 48 hours now, but there's been no movement since yesterday afternoon, when word that Halladay and the Phillies had agreed on a contract leaked out.

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December 16, 2009 12:22 pm

On the Beat: Midweek Update

24

John Perrotto

The Winter Meetings after-party stands to blow away the event itself, with changes coming on multiple fronts.

Bud Selig is usually so quick to remind everyone that such concepts as the wild card and interleague play were added to Major League Baseball during his commissionership that one fears he might blow out a rotator cuff while vigorously patting himself on the back. However, with attendance falling and television ratings down, Selig is admitting that the grand old game has some problems. On Tuesday, he announced the formation of a 14-person special committee for on-field matters that includes field managers, general managers, and club owners, among others. Glaring in their omission were players and umpires.

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October 25, 2009 1:14 pm

On the Beat: Weekend Update

9

John Perrotto

While the ALCS went into rain delay mode, there's still news and moves from around the majors.

Jimmy Rollins was reflecting on the previous October and looking ahead to this year's postseason one day early in spring training, when he said something that made it clear the Phillies would not be complacent this season. "What we did last year, winning a World Series, was a great accomplishment and something we can cherish for the rest of our lives," the shortstop said. "You know what, though? The truly great teams are the ones who won more than one World Series. The teams people remember and talk about forever are the ones who did it more than once. That's what I'd like to see us do, and I think everyone else on this team feels the same way."

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October 21, 2009 12:00 pm

Prospectus Today: The Horror

87

Joe Sheehan

'Tis the season for frank realizations, about player greatness, permanent truths, and spectacular incompetence.

For such an interesting and entertaining night, we learned nothing new:

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October 14, 2009 12:52 am

Prospectus Today: A Triple Play of Division Series Post Mortems

42

Joe Sheehan

Thirteen total games is hardly a fair representation of four series that all featured close games and some questionable decisions.

It feels like we deserved more than this. A week ago, three of the four postseason series seemed so evenly matched as to defy prediction. Two of those three did just that, but not in the way expected. The Cardinals scored six runs in three games en route to being eliminated by the Dodgers, and the Red Sox weren't much better in being swept by the Angels. The Twins, as expected, went down to the Yankees despite mostly holding down the game's best offense.

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