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06-27

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13

Bullpen Report: Stuck in the Middle
by
Mike Gianella

04-22

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46

The Stash List: First Edition
by
Bret Sayre

03-05

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17

Pre-Season Positional Rankings: Top 80 Fantasy Starting Pitchers, Part One: 1-40
by
Paul Sporer

08-31

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5

Weekly Planner: Week 23
by
Paul Sporer

07-27

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0

Weekly Planner: Week 18
by
Paul Sporer

03-02

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4

Collateral Damage: Socket to Him
by
Corey Dawkins and Rebecca Glass

02-29

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2

Collateral Damage: Spring Training Injury Roundup: Don't Try This At Home
by
Corey Dawkins and Rebecca Glass

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-27

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8

Collateral Damage: Spring Training Injury Roundup: It's What's for Dinner
by
Corey Dawkins

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

02-15

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5

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Alex Escobar
by
Corey Dawkins

02-13

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4

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Justin Duchscherer
by
Corey Dawkins

01-27

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15

The BP Wayback Machine: Money Poorly Spent, Now and Then
by
John Perrotto

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

11-16

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20

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: One of These Days, Baseball Will Come Back to Save Me
by
Jason Parks

11-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 12-15, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

10-31

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22

Playoff Prospectus: Shuffling Through the World Series
by
Jason Parks

10-18

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8

On the Beat: Rangers Renaissance
by
John Perrotto

09-29

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26

The Lineup Card: 14 Scariest Things to Happen While Driving
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-26

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0

Collateral Damage: Something Strasburg This Way Comes
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

08-15

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6

Collateral Damage: Beware of Batted Balls
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

08-12

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: WWWMW (What's Wrong With Mariano Week)
by
Jay Jaffe

08-10

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48

The Lineup Card: 12 Favorite Basebrawls and Individual Performances in Basebrawls
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-10

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3

Collateral Damage: Backed into Corners
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

08-04

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6

Spinning Yarn: Counsell for the Defense
by
Mike Fast

07-18

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8

Collateral Damage: The Hidden Pain
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

06-29

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2

Prospectus Hit List: AL: Welcome to the Party
by
Jay Jaffe

06-24

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3

Collateral Damage: First Baseman, Heal Thyself
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

06-20

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0

Prospectus Hit List: AL: Sox Hanging On
by
Tommy Bennett

06-10

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4

Collateral Damage: Pennant Race Pains
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

06-08

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11

Collateral Damage: Another Aching Athletic
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

04-28

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2

Fantasy Beat: Value Picks in the Bullpen
by
Mike Petriello

04-26

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14

Transaction Analysis: Return of the Busted Prospects
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-25

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6

Prospectus Hit List: A Return to Normalcy
by
Jay Jaffe

04-22

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15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Baseball, Boyhood, and Bullpen Carts
by
Josh Wilker

04-22

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Are The Indians For Real?
by
Jay Jaffe

04-18

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5

Collateral Damage: One Step Forward, Several Steps back
by
Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin

04-12

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14

Transaction Analysis: Never Enough Pitching
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-01

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Adam Greenberg
by
David Laurila

02-22

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14

Transaction Analysis: Branyan, Weeks, and Detritus
by
Christina Kahrl

01-27

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1

Prospectus Q&A: John Axford
by
David Laurila

01-12

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16

Transaction Analysis: NL Central Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

01-05

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6

Transaction Analysis: NL East Update
by
Christina Kahrl

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-26

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8

GM for a Day: Toronto Blue Jays
by
Jay Jaffe

10-07

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Lefty-on-Lefty Violence
by
Jay Jaffe

09-29

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88

Under The Knife: Fade To Black Album
by
Will Carroll

09-27

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14

Under The Knife: A Small Part Of Tenth Inning
by
Will Carroll

09-21

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8

Transaction Action: Braves, Marlins, Mets
by
Christina Kahrl

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June 27, 2013 5:00 am

Bullpen Report: Stuck in the Middle

13

Mike Gianella

Mike explains why elite middle relievers haven't climbed his tiers, before revealing the latest edition of those tiers and the updated dollar values.

Welcome to another installment of The Bullpen Report. As a reminder, closers are rated in five tiers from best to worst. The tiers are a combination of my opinion of a pitcher’s ability, the likelihood that he will pick up saves, and his security in the job. For example, a pitcher in the third tier might have better skills than a pitcher in the second tier, but if the third tier pitcher is new to the job or has blown a couple of saves in the last week this factors into the ranking as well.

Last week, one of my readers wanted to know why I didn’t have a middle reliever in the top tier. Although middle relievers are integral in some leagues, I have not been ranking them due to the fact that their value is vastly different depending upon each league’s rules. In leagues that use holds as a separate category, non-closers carry a great deal of value. In standard mixed leagues with no start limits, you might not feel the need to carry a middle reliever on your staff at all. My goal is to take a cursory look at a handful of valuable middle relief arms in a non-holds, deeper-league, standard Roto format.

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April 22, 2013 5:00 am

The Stash List: First Edition

46

Bret Sayre

Jurickson Profar leads off the inaugural edition of Bret's look at little-owned players worthy of a spot on your bench.

If you’re a long-time rotisserie baseball player, you surely remember the days of just having an active lineup and nothing else. In fact, I’m sure some readers still play in leagues like that—my biggest home league is like that, and has been since it was formed back in 1984. However, as the game has expanded and developed, it has changed. It is now the norm to have multiple reserve/bench spots, and I play in leagues where that number ranges anywhere from three to eight. Those bench spots are valuable commodities and can be used in any number of ways.

Essentially, the choice of how you use your each of your bench spots comes down to the following question: Do I want to extract small pieces of value throughout the entire season or do I want to stash a high-upside player who may have potentially significant value down the line? More often than not, these bench spots are used on pitchers who can be plugged in as need be to boost your performance in pitching categories. But there are other options. In fact, I wrote back in February about the potential benefit to using the opportunity cost of a bench spot as part of a position player platoon. However, the ends of benches are best left for the potential fantasy gold mines—and that’s why this column exists.

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A fantastic foursome stands above the rest, but there are plenty of upside plays in the middle rounds.

The Baseball Prospectus fantasy team has been rolling out its positional rankings over the past couple of weeks, and will conclude the process next week. Each team member assigned to cover a position will create an initial top 15 (more for outfielders and starting pitchers) on his own. He will then send that list to the rest of the team for discussion, at which point we will debate the rankings, both in terms of each player’s specific placement and the merits on which he was included in the top 15. This back-and-forth debate will yield the final list, which will be presented by the original author with notes on the pertinent players. We encourage you to bring your opinions into the fray using the comment section below.

Here are the previous rankings lists:

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August 31, 2012 5:00 am

Weekly Planner: Week 23

5

Paul Sporer

Paul returns to this week to help you decide which two-start pitchers are worth your time.

Back at it again, but a big thanks is in order to Derek Carty for filling in on both of my columns last week.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Auto-Starts:
CC Sabathia and James Shields


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July 27, 2012 5:00 am

Weekly Planner: Week 18

0

Paul Sporer

This week finds tons of two-start pitchers worth using, so have at it.

Despite actually posting better peripherals than last year, Ian Kennedy’s ERA and WHIP have lagged this year, but he appears to be getting back on track with back-to-back gems and a chance for a third straight and second in a week when he faces the Mets on Saturday. He is still toting a 4.20 ERA, though, so there may still be time to buy at a discount. Anyone paying attention isn’t just going to give him away, but it’s worth a shot. Frankly, I’d buy at market value, so any discount would be icing.

It was supposed to be a star-studded week in the NL with six auto-starters going, but Clayton Kershaw, R.A. Dickey, and Roy Halladay have all been smacked around in their initial start of the week. At least Zack Greinke, Gio Gonzalez, and Josh Johnson have held up their end. Of the three duds, I’m not at all worried about Kershaw, am slightly concerned about Dickey’s horrid July, and am legitimately worried that Halladay simply isn’t 100 percent yet.

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March 2, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Socket to Him

4

Corey Dawkins and Rebecca Glass

A.J. Burnett finds out just what it means to be a pirate, a couple players go under the knife, and various other injuries around spring training.

A.J. Burnett, PIT (Eye)
Bunting practice is usually not dangerous; occasionally a batter might injure a finger but, only rarely does something more serious happen. On Wednesday, Burnett fell into this latter category. In the video of the incident in question, the ball deflects off of Burnett’s bat and strikes him at the corner of his eye and the eye socket. He is helped by assistant athletic trainer Ben Potenziano and walks off the field with a towel to his face. After flying back to Pittsburgh for more tests, Burnett was diagnosed with an orbital bone fracture and will undergo surgery on Friday. Bones heal at a fairly predictable pace; players usually return between four and eight weeks. Burnett will have to take it easy, but assuming there is no serious trauma to the eye itself, he should be able to start getting into baseball shape before that magic number is reached. Still, Burnett will almost certainly start the season on the disabled list.

Ryan Howard, PHI (Achilles surgery)
After Howard saw Dr. Myerson, additional information came to light. He had a small procedure to clean out stitch and surrounding tissue; the stitch was an internal one but the integrity of the Achilles repair is not compromised. This is the key: if the repair was significantly compromised, Howard may not have been able to make it back this year. Fortunately, this was not the case. During the procedure, Dr. Myerson consulted with infectious disease specialists, which revealed that Howard had an infection and the first baseman was placed on antibiotics. With news that the tendon is not compromised, the biggest issue is keeping the wound clean and not infected. Recovery from Achilles surgeries are so long and have so many ups and downs that there is no true timetable on Howard’s, but this could be seen as a relatively minor blip in the process.



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Scott Sizemore, Freddie Freeman, Matt Moore and others...

Scott Sizemore, OAK (Torn ACL)
An MRI revealed a torn ACL, ending Sizemore’s season before it started. In the past, ACL surgery was performed immediately after injury and involved being placed in a cast; surgeons eventually found that complications (such as extreme stiffness and loss of range of motion) were occurring more often than they expected. Now, surgery is delayed for about four to six weeks while the player attends physical therapy to decrease swelling while increasing range of motion and strength. Cutting and pivoting activities are avoided for at least five or, more frequently, six months. The best-case scenario for Sizemore would have him returning around the last week of the season, so it’s safe to assume that he will miss the entire year; he should be able to make a full recovery for 2013. Josh Donaldson is being given a shot to take over third base; normally players who switch positions are at a slightly higher risk of injury, but he played third over the winter so the risk is somewhat lessened. 

Brian Roberts, BAL (Post-Concussion Syndrome)
Roberts’ recovery from his concussion has been a long road, but he appears to be making his way back to full recovery: He recently ran sprints with Brady Anderson in camp and responded well. Concussion management involves walking a very thin line with a slow progression. Roberts is still several stages away from full recovery, though sprinting without a recurrence of symptoms is a good first step. He still must be able to run the bases, go through extended hitting sessions, and make it through fielding drills. His final step would involve sliding drills, which have given him trouble before. With no timetable set for his return, just making it back will be an accomplishment.



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Wrapping up our tour of the AL Central by discussing how good the Tigers can be, how close the Royals are to being competitive, and the sorry state of the Twins.

1) Will their defensive experiment work out?

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Spring training has just started, but already players are nursing injuries.

Spring training has only just begun, but we already have news aplenty to digest. Let’s go right to the infirmary report:

Ryan Howard, PHI (Left Achilles Surgery)
Howard’s recovery from surgery on his torn left achilles tendon has been a rollercoaster ride. He was spotted taking grounders from a stationary position as well as running late last week, but with a limp. Subsequently, it was revealed that one of the stitches had a seroma forming around it. While this sounds ominous, a seroma is merely a pocket of fluid very similar to a cyst. This far out from surgery, the stitches involved are not the ones that you see on the skin’s surface, but rather a buried stitch used to close tissues deeper under the skin; the cyst developed become the body views it as a foreign invader. The body begins to “spit the stitch,” attempting to push it out of the body. This is not at all uncommon following surgery, particularly plastic surgery or mastectomies, and is different from an abscess in that it is not infected. They can be drained, but anytime you introduce a needle into the skin there is a chance infection will set in.


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February 22, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview

28

Derek Carty and Michael Jong

Roundtable discussion of the pressing questions facing the NL East teams as we approach the start of the season

1) After a disappointing sophomore campaign, what can we expect of Jason Heyward going forward?
MJ:
Jason Heyward had an injury-riddled sophomore season in Atlanta, but there is a lot to like about his chances at a rebound campaign in 2012. His offensive line was deflated by a .260 BABIP, but his peripherals were once again stellar. His 11.6 percent walk rate represented a regression from 2010 but cannot be considered poor, and his .162 ISO likewise dropped from the previous year but did not experience a precipitous fall.


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February 20, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview

19

R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

Roundtable discussion of the most pressing issues facing each AL East team entering Spring Training

PECOTA Team Projections
Record: 72-90
Team WARP: 21.0
Team TAv: .264
Runs Scored: 701
Runs Allowed: 798
Team FRAA: -11.4







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February 15, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Alex Escobar

5

Corey Dawkins

For this former prospect, a career like the game "Operation"

With only weeks to go until spring training gets into high gear, Collateral Damage takes a look at the baseball players (three pitchers, three position players) who have spent more time on the disabled list over the past decade than anyone else. Up next: Alex Escobar.

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