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Articles Tagged Attendance 

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09-17

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Tiger Plan
by
Nate Silver

10-08

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10

Bizball: Inside 2012 MLB Attendance, Plus Postseason TV Ratings Update
by
Maury Brown

09-05

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 35: Is Coors Field to Blame for the Rockies' Struggles?/Are Fans at Fault When Teams Don't Draw?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-23

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18

Bizball: 12 Detailed Looks At Early MLB Attendance
by
Maury Brown

04-19

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26

The Payoff Pitch: Plenty of Good Seats Still Available
by
Neil deMause

04-05

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Snowbound Schedule
by
Nate Silver

03-01

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: Wild Card: A Fairy Tale
by
Nate Silver

07-27

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37

Ahead in the Count: Aces and Attendance
by
Matt Swartz

06-07

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88

Prospectus Idol Entry: A Tale of Two Teams: The Attendance Game
by
Tim Kniker

04-29

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0

Blazing the O'Malley Trail
by
Gary Gillette

05-17

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1

Lies, Damned Lies: Moving the Marlins
by
Nate Silver

05-04

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Defining a Market, Part Two
by
Nate Silver

05-03

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Defining a Market, Part One
by
Nate Silver

04-25

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0

The Big Picture: If You Win, They Will Come
by
David Pinto

04-18

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0

The Big Picture
by
David Pinto

04-13

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Snowbound Schedule
by
Nate Silver

08-07

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0

The Ledger Domain: Mid-Atlantic Tango: Looking at the Orioles and Nationals Attendance
by
Maury Brown

09-17

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Wild Card: A Fairy Tale
by
Nate Silver

09-10

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Lies, Damned Lies: Loopy in the Loop
by
Nate Silver

06-18

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Lies, Damned Lies: Bounces
by
Nate Silver

01-28

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0

Prospectus Feature: Expanding the Playoffs
by
Jeff Bower

09-18

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The Daily Prospectus: Bud and Carl: Visionaries?
by
Gary Huckabay

06-04

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From The Mailbag: Stadia, Transactions Fun, and Ben Davis
by
Baseball Prospectus

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Are pennant races the only thing that can keep fans coming to the park in September?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Should rebuilding teams sign recognizable veterans in order to generate fan interest? Nate looked for an answer in the piece reprinted below, which was originally published as a "Lies, Damned Lies" column on August 25, 2004.


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Maury looks at 2012's attendance winners and losers as well as some early postseason ratings.

With the 2012 regular season in the books, it’s time to look at how clubs did at selling tickets. Yes, they call it “attendance,” but it’s really “paid attendance,” a showing of tickets sold and rarely reflective of actual butts in the seats. The league’s 30 clubs drew 74,859,268 over 2,423 games this year: an increase of 2 percent. While this wasn’t as good as I projected before the season started, it was the league’s largest year-to-year growth since the 2007 season total rose 4.6 percent over 2006. Nine clubs drew more than three million in paid attendance this season, while 13 clubs eclipsed the 2.5 million mark. In addition, this is the second consecutive season that total attendance increased over the previous year and marks the highest attendance since 2008. When things are all said and done, 2012 will rank as the fifth-best single-season in MLB history in terms of attendance.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that attendance between 2010 and 2011, while technically up, was basically the same. The league sold 397,715 more tickets last year than 2010, or an increase of less than one percent. Let’s call that what it is: flat. In fact, over the last four years, the league has seen attendance pretty much remain flat. When you factor in new ballparks for the Mets, Yankees, Twins, and Marlins over the period, this tells us that either the sour economy still holds its grip on America’s discretionary income or MLB’s true “golden era”, as Selig likes to call it, was really 2004-2008 when attendance soared. Still, the league has to be happy; last year, the Dodgers’ attendance cratered during Frank McCourt’s tenure, and there were a considerable number of rainouts. This season, rainouts weren’t as high, and with the two additional Wild Card teams added in, the races for a postseason berth were more compelling.

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Ben and Sam consider whether the ballpark might be to blame for the Rockies' lackluster first two decades, then discuss the annual phenomenon of attendance shaming.

Ben and Sam consider whether the ballpark might be to blame for the Rockies' lackluster first two decades, then discuss the annual phenomenon of attendance shaming.

Episode 35: "Is Coors Field to Blame for the Rockies' Struggles?/Are Fans at Fault When Teams Don't Draw?"

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April 23, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: 12 Detailed Looks At Early MLB Attendance

18

Maury Brown

Examining attendance trends throughout Major League Baseball in the early going of 2012

You’re reading Baseball Prospectus, and I write for them. So, maybe not everyone will understand when I say that numbers are flat. They don’t tell the whole story. They can only get you close. What you have to have with numbers is “context.” I don’t care what the application of numbers is; if you don’t explain them, you’re only telling part of a story and, possibly, the wrong one.

Major League Baseball attendance is no different. The variables underneath what drives attendance figures are often overlooked. Each year I look at the numbers, and each year there seems to be something else to throw in to try and determine the underlying facets of them.

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April 19, 2011 10:00 am

The Payoff Pitch: Plenty of Good Seats Still Available

26

Neil deMause

Are April's record-low attendance marks a sign that the ticket bubble has burst?

The young baseball season is already shaping up to be lots of things—the Year of the Great Red Sox Collapse, maybe, or the Year of the Exploding Appendices—but one theme that might actually survive small-sample goofiness to have some legs is the Year the Fans Went Away. MLB attendance has been gradually sliding ever since its peak in 2007, but the early signs this year have been pretty alarming:

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Revisiting Nate's attempt to quantify the trade-off in scheduling cold-weather games.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

As we welcome another stretch of cold-weather baseball and its attendant scheduling concerns, here's another look at Nate Silver's statistical take on the subject in a "Lies, Damned Lies" column from April 13, 2007.

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What does a voice from BP's past have to say about the prospect of a second wild card?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

We've offered a number of more contemporary takes on the matter, but with the prospect of a second wild card looming, let's flash back to what Nate had to say on the subject in an article that originally ran as a "Lies, Damned Lies" column on September 17, 2003.

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July 27, 2009 12:44 pm

Ahead in the Count: Aces and Attendance

37

Matt Swartz

Does a franchise pitcher like Roy Halladay have an outsized impact on Blue Jays attendance, and would dealing him do likewise?

In last week's article, I estimated a dollar value of adding Roy Halladay for each of the contending teams mentioned in trade rumors related to Doc as of last week. Using an approximation of the effect on playoff odds and subsequent success in the playoffs, I found that Roy Halladay's contract was worth nearly $15 million more to a contender than he is to the Blue Jays. However, there are many other factors that play a role in revenue that vary by team, and one factor is that Blue Jays fans love Roy Halladay. Many of those fans cannot stand the thought of losing him, and the Jays certainly may wonder if subtracting him would hurt their attendance enough to deem it unwise. The concept of a franchise player having a high sentimental value to a city is one worth exploring, so let's discuss the effect of Roy Halladay on the Blue Jays' attendance.

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As the scoreboard programmer for the Trenton Thunder in their inaugural season (1994), one of my daily tasks was to enter in player averages from the compiled statistics faxed to us from the Howe News Bureau. Before I did this, there was one statistic that my fellow press-box compatriots and I craved above all us: the attendance standings. Every day, we wanted to see if we were beating the other two Eastern League franchises with new stadiums: the Portland Sea Dogs and the Bowie Baysox. The memory of these daily quests for the attendance standings recently got me thinking about the drivers of baseball attendance.

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April 29, 2008 12:00 am

Blazing the O'Malley Trail

0

Gary Gillette

The legacy of the Dodgers move west, and setting the record straight on Brooklyn's support of the Bums.

Another problem with evaluating O'Malley's legacy is that many revisionists, consciously or unconsciously, make a big deal out of the Dodgers' Brooklyn attendance, then and now. Disparage the Dodgers' support in the 1950s as a way of rationalizing O'Malley's gambit, they write phrases like "the Dodgers barely drew a million fans" in Brooklyn in the 1950s, as if that were some kind of crime. The fact is that both major leagues in the 1950s were in deep trouble, with overall attendance declining for a multitude of reasons. It is neither fair nor instructive to compare today's attendance, when the US population is double what it was in 1950, with five decades ago unless one also puts those numbers in context. Furthermore, the Los Angeles market of the twenty-first century is more than four times the size of Brooklyn's market in 1950.

The myth of weak attendance in Brooklyn undergirds the popular understanding of O'Malley's inspiration to go west. Despite the misconceptions that have obscured the facts since the move, the Dodgers had drawn better than the NL average (excluding Brooklyn) in every season from 1938 through 1956. Only in 1957, the Dodgers' last year in Brooklyn-and a season throughout which rumors swirled that the team was headed west-did O'Malley's team fall a few thousand fans short of the league mean in attendance.

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May 17, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Moving the Marlins

1

Nate Silver

Nate uncovers the best spot for the Fish to migrate to, should they choose to swim to other waters.

If you build it, will they come? Cities that are attempting to procure a major league baseball team invariably find some way to spin the numbers in the most favorable light possible. I found a 1989 New York Times article in which Buffalo Bills owner Frank Rich, then trying to land a baseball expansion team in his city, claimed that Buffalo was the eighth-largest TV market in the country "when you include Rochester, Syracuse and the Niagara Peninsula." Backers of the San Antonio Marlins can cite the large population of the city proper, ignoring that its media market is decidedly minor league.

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May 4, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Defining a Market, Part Two

0

Nate Silver

Nate's attempt to determine a market size for every major league team continues, with stats on attendance and television spheres for all the clubs.

I hope yesterday's part one didn't lose you guys, because now for the (comparatively) fun part: our team-by-team breakdown. In addition to the attendance and TV estimates from my model, I have provided a comparison to the Mike Jones figures, and also the raw census data from each team's primary MSA. The numbers in parenthesis represents a team's relative market share (with 100 representing league average) and its rank among the 30 clubs in that category.

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