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Articles Tagged Atlanta Braves 

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08-17

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Transaction Analysis: Tigers Add Iglesias Insurance
by
Bryan Grosnick and Christopher Crawford

08-16

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BP Unfiltered: Meet the Guy Who Struck Out 25 in Nine Innings, Sort Of
by
Sam Miller

08-10

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1

Transaction Analysis: Switch-Pitchers and Triple-Digit Heat
by
Steve Givarz, Jeffrey Paternostro and Bryan Grosnick

08-04

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Two-Strike Approach: Buy High, Shel Low
by
Cat Garcia

08-02

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Transaction Analysis: Take My Contract, Please
by
Bryan Grosnick and Ben Carsley

07-28

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Transaction Analysis: Reliever Swap, Starring Storen and Benoit
by
Bryan Grosnick and Wilson Karaman

07-28

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6

The GM Trade Game!
by
Ben Carsley and BP Staff

07-26

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Transaction Analysis: Made For Joaquin
by
Bryan Grosnick

07-11

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3

Transaction Analysis: Dave Dombrowski is a Hustler, Baby
by
Bryan Grosnick

07-01

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Transaction Analysis: Rodney Takes His Quiver To Miami
by
Bryan Grosnick, Matthew Trueblood, Wilson Karaman and Christopher Crawford

06-29

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2

An Agent's Take: A Sense of Where You Are
by
Joshua Kusnick

06-21

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Transaction Analysis: The St. Louis Outfield Shuffle
by
Grant Jones, Christopher Crawford and Bryan Grosnick

06-19

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Prospectus Feature: The Allure Of The First-Act Narrative
by
Trevor Strunk

06-10

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Prospectus Feature: It's June 10th, and July 2 Deals Are Happening
by
Trevor Strunk

06-09

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1

What You Need to Know: Bad Braves Snap Pitiful Streak
by
Demetrius Bell

06-09

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2

Transaction Analysis: Kelly Johnson and the Mets, Together Again
by
Bryan Grosnick and Jarrett Seidler

06-09

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4

Rubbing Mud: The White Sox In A Nutshell
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-07

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2

Prospectus Feature: Do Pathetic, Embarrassing, Miserable Failures Breed Success?
by
Rob Mains

06-06

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BP Announcements: Baseball Prospectus Night at Turner Field - July 16, 2016
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-25

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2

Transaction Analysis: Return of The Freak
by
Matthew Trueblood, Kate Morrison, Bryan Grosnick, Adam McInturff, Steve Givarz and Christopher Crawford

05-19

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13

Life at the Margins: Deck Chair Moved
by
Rian Watt

05-18

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8

Transaction Analysis: Fredi, Blame, Fired
by
Aaron Gleeman, Wilson Karaman and Matthew Trueblood

05-10

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5

What You Need to Know: Sonny Gray's Short-Lived Mound Shuffle
by
Daniel Rathman

04-29

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What You Need to Know: Meet the Phillies
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-28

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What You Need to Know: The Braves Might Not Have a Floor
by
Demetrius Bell

04-27

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Baseball Therapy: Can Teams Come Back From a Comeback?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-26

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Outta Left Field: Craig Kimbrel Is Increasing His Lead
by
Dustin Palmateer

04-25

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34

Rubbing Mud: Why Would Anybody Watch the Braves?
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-15

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What You Need to Know: Nobody Is 0-21, Yet
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-12

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Baseball Therapy: Somebody Is Finally Trying to Kill the Traditional Closer Role
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-11

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6

Fifth Column: The Week In Pain
by
Michael Baumann

03-30

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Transaction Analysis: Deep Cuts For The SuperFans
by
Bryan Grosnick

03-28

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2

Rumor Roundup: Battle for Fourth Place
by
Ashley Varela

03-24

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Rumor Roundup: Angels Out Of Their Depth
by
Demetrius Bell

03-15

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Winter Is Leaving
by
Rian Watt

03-10

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4

Rumor Roundup: The Big Bad Beltre Extension
by
Demetrius Bell

03-02

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3

Prospectus Feature: The Players' Share of Baseball's Wealth
by
Samuel Mann

02-18

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32

Players Prefer Presentation: Finding and Fixing Baseball's Worst Positions
by
Meg Rowley

12-11

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Transaction Analysis: The Ex-Prospects Challenge Trade
by
R.J. Anderson

12-09

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24

Transaction Analysis: The Shelby Shocker
by
Matthew Trueblood, J.J. Jansons and Christopher Crawford

12-04

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Transaction Analysis: NL Non-Tenders To Rock Your World
by
R.J. Anderson

07-02

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3

The Call-Up: Manny Banuelos
by
David Lee and Wilson Karaman

05-21

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Fantasy Freestyle: Rebuilding = Opportunity
by
J.J. Jansons

05-14

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6

Rubbing Mud: Very Bad But Not (Altogether) Boring
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-30

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2

BP Unfiltered: The Comeback
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-30

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20

An Agent's Take: The Luckiest Accidents
by
Joshua Kusnick

04-22

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Transaction Analysis: The Bad Luck Brewers
by
R.J. Anderson

04-10

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28

Rubbing Mud: Carlos Quentin's DFA is This Godforsaken Era in a Nutshell
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-06

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Transaction Analysis: Royals Go On A Ventura
by
R.J. Anderson and Christopher Crawford

04-06

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33

Transaction Analysis: The Last Blockbuster of the Offseason
by
Matthew Trueblood, Mark Anderson, Bret Sayre and Wilson Karaman

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Zach Eflin and Jaimeson Taillon's stories began this month, and we all fill in the plots.

On Tuesday, June 14th, Phillies starter Zach Eflin made history. Well, history of a sort. Against the Toronto Blue Jays—an offense that, you may have heard, is pretty good—Eflin pitched 2 2/3 innings, giving up eight runs on nine hits, three of which were home runs. He did strike out three, but also walked two, leading to a pretty rough first night. Here are some sparknotes to help historically contextualize Eflin’s very first start as a major leaguer:

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The uncomfortable feeling of hoping your favorite team will save money signing Latin teenagers.

We’re at the point in the season, as you may have heard a few times now, where we can begin to judge who is and who is not a contender for the playoffs. Some teams are in a no-doubt playoff push even in these early June days, and teams like the Chicago Cubs and the Washington Nationals are looking ahead to the trade deadline to see who they can pick up to bolster their runs. Then there are teams like the San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers, or the Baltimore Orioles and Boston Red Sox, who find themselves in a dog fight, and who can look forward to several months of local columns debating the plusses and minuses of “selling the youngsters” and “adding experience.” But what about the already-also-rans like the Atlanta Braves or the Minnesota Twins? What can they look to in the doldrums of uncompetitive June? Well, July 2nd, of course.

July 2nd marks the date that amateur free agents from outside the United States can officially enter into deals with major-league clubs. It is basically a moment when, somehow leaping the bounds of even our most prestigious wishful prospect thinking, teams sign 16-year-old kids from the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, and any number of other (mainly Latin American) countries while the teams’ fans wonder if these kids will be able to help in 2018. It’s an exciting day, marking the start of a new crop of hope in the minor leagues, a kind of second draft to pump excitement into even the most moribund fanbase. It’s fun, basically.

The reality of the day, however, outside of its hopeful pomp, is a bit more complex. Many of the free agents that will “sign” on July 2nd have been under handshake deals for far longer than that. Kevin Maitan, the Venezuelan shortstop who supposedly defends like Andrelton Simmons and hits like Miguel Cabrera and rides a stallion of white gold named Juan de Cortez onto the field, apparently has an unofficial agreement with the Atlanta Braves. This is, of course, illegal, but the deal exists in the odd gray area of plausible deniability and indeterminate rules that exist for Major League Baseball’s international free agents. Indeed, while spending caps introduced to the 2012 signing period have made the international market not quite the Wild West free-for-all it used to be, “July 2nd” can stand in metonymically for the massive business of finding, courting, and underpaying the 16-year-olds who will win you a championship seven years down the line. And this business sees teams bending and breaking the rules as a matter of course, as the cost of playing the game in the first place.

And MLB has been attempting to curb this rule bending, mainly by introducing newer and more exotic rules. Handshake deals and communication with free agents prior to 16 are frowned upon and forbidden, if not always explicitly. Spending caps, tied to draft position, have been levied on each team, and going over that cap carries the penalty of not being able to select any players on the following July 2nd deadline, along with a (probably far more onerous) financial penalty. To give you an idea of how labyrinthine these rules can get, here’s an excerpt from a Ben Badler column from 2014 on a then-new rule change:

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Julio Teheran pitches the Braves past the Padres, James Shields gets walloped in his Chicago debut, Josh Donaldson still and always good, and more.

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Kelly Johnson heads to New York, by way of Atlanta, for the second straight season.

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The small move that went so, so bad in a season that is sliding in that direction.

The Braves aren’t playing Tyler Flowers all that much, which is smart. The entire plan in Atlanta this season is to lose games, after all, and Flowers poses a threat to that mission. In 115 plate appearances thus far, Flowers has a .260 TAv, and he’s been his usual (very good) framing self behind the plate. He’s been worth 0.8 WARP already, despite his part-time role, but A.J. Pierzynski has saved the team from disaster with his .185 TAv and -0.8 WARP. The best news for the Braves, though, is that their two backstops make just $5 million combined this season. To take up two roster spots, keep the team replacement-level or worse, and leave so much money in the pockets of corporate owners is about as much as the team could ask from a catching tandem. Every nickel not spent on payroll is another nickel the team can spend on the effort to get their next new stadium built with other people’s money.

Let’s say that you weren’t the Braves, though. Let’s say you’re a team that wants to win games this season. If you were such a team, you probably wouldn’t want Pierzynski and Flowers for your catching duo. At the very least, you might seek to play Flowers more often, and Pierzynski less, so that you would get at least the half a win or so above replacement that $5 million usually buys in free agency. Really, though, it’s a pretty unappealing catching situation. It’s hard to imagine a contender who would envy it. There is one, though, and here’s the funny part: It's the only other team that has employed this exact pair in the past.

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Preempting a bunch of Chicago Cubs hot takes.

As you may have heard, the Chicago Cubs started the season pretty well. As of the end of May, they were 35-15, playing exactly .700 ball. That projects to a 113-49 record over 162 games, which would be the most wins in a season since the Mariners won 116 in 2001, and the most in the National League since, well, since the Chicago Cubs won 116 in 1906.

But that wasn’t the only notable end-of-May record. The Twins and Braves were both 15-36, on pace for 48-114. The Reds, at 17-35, were on pace for 53-109. The 20-33 Padres projected to 61-101, raising the question of how Padres owner Ron Fowler would describe the Twins, Braves, or Reds. On the other hand, the 32-20 Red Sox were on pace to finish 100-62, the 33-21 Giants were on track for 99-63, the 32-21 Nationals on pace for 98-64, the 31-21 Rangers for 97-65, and the 30-21 Mariners for 95-67. So there were, at the end of May, four teams with a shot at 100 losses and six that could win 100.

As an aside, I am fully cognizant that “on pace for” is intellectually lazy and ignorant, unless it’s wielded cleverly by the likes of Jayson Stark or Cespedes Family Barbecue. (Especially the Cespedes Family Barbecue link. You should check it out. Go ahead, it won’t take long. I’ll still be here.) So no, I’m not implying that there actually will be four teams with 62 or fewer wins and six with 62 or fewer losses. I’m just setting the tone. Play along with me here.

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We're coming to Atlanta on July 16th. Reserve your spot at the event today!

Baseball Prospectus and the Atlanta Braves invite you to join us for a great day of baseball on Saturday, July 16, 2016 at Turner Field. Thanks to the fine folks in the Braves' front office, we are proud to be able to offer our guests the following:

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Tim Lincecum finds a home for his comeback, Blake Swihart rejoins the Red Sox as an outfielder, and the Braves buy a draft pick.

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Firing Fredi Gonzalez is no cause for celebration in Atlanta. Right now, nothing is.

When you have nothing to say, sometimes it’s best to say nothing at all. By firing Fredi Gonzalez earlier this week, the Braves simultaneously said something and, at the same time, implicitly admitted that it would have been far, far better to say nothing at all. Because what, really, was the point of what happened this week? When you choose to enter the year with a manager in place—particularly a manager who, as is the case with Gonzalez, has been around for a while—you’re making a statement about your confidence in that manager’s ability to see you through the season in the way you’ve designed the season to be played. If you weren’t confident in the same, you would have made a change in the offseason.

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Atlana has odd timing in firing Fredi Gonzalez, Francisco Cervelli shows how much he loves Pittsburgh, and Tony Kemp arrives in Houston.

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The A's ace adjusts but struggles again, the Yankees hit bombs, Corey Kluber bombs, and the best Bad-Braves Fun Fact we heard yesterday.

The Monday Takeaway
When this season began, Sonny Gray was Sonny Gray. Seven innings of one-run work on Opening Day paved the way for three more quality efforts, amounting to a 2.73 ERA four starts into his 2016 campaign. Then, on April 27th, the Tigers sent Gray to the showers after just two-plus innings. And while the right-hander bounced back to log seven innings six days later, the Mariners tagged him for 11 hits and seven runs during his time on the hill.


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Whoppingly unexpected records in the NL East, Jake Arrieta allows a run, and more.

For every underperforming team like the Astros, there is a club that shocks us with its refusal to shut up and lose like it's supposed to. One of those teams is the Phillies. At 12-10, they sit just a breath out of first place after completing a sweep of the division-leading Nationals. Thursday’s victory was a 3-0 effort that saw yet another cathartic and well-earned walloping of Jonathan Papelbon. This could easily be a space to talk about the euphoric feeling of dunking on the schoolyard bully who picks you last for basketball in gym class, but instead we’ll talk about Bryce Harper and Elvis Araujo.

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