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Articles Tagged Andy Pettitte 

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09-24

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0

TINSTAAPP: TINSTAAPP Episode 14: Scherzer at Harvey
by
Paul Sporer and Doug Thorburn

03-04

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7

Painting the Black: The 2013 Free Agents and Hidden Rationality
by
R.J. Anderson

11-30

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12

Transaction Analysis: Nats Finally Get Span
by
R.J. Anderson and Mark Anderson

11-13

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34

Out of Left Field: What $205 Million Buys on the Free Agent Market
by
Matthew Kory

11-05

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42

Painting the Black: The 50 Best Free Agents
by
R.J. Anderson

06-29

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2

Collateral Damage Daily: Friday, June 29
by
Corey Dawkins

06-28

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2

Collateral Damage Daily: Thursday, June 28
by
Corey Dawkins

06-16

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2

BP Unfiltered: How to Get Bryce Harper Out Every Time
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-07

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3

Overthinking It: Slow and Steady Wins Some Races
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-23

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bartolo Colon and the Comeback Kids
by
Jay Jaffe

03-22

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2

On the Beat: Pettitte Returns to the Big Apple
by
John Perrotto

03-21

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4

Sobsequy: The Best of the Triple-A Retreads
by
Adam Sobsey

03-19

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Transaction Analysis: Pettitte Returns
by
R.J. Anderson

03-19

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5

Out of Left Field: On Baseball Unretirement
by
Matthew Kory

03-19

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: AL Rotation Rumble
by
Jay Jaffe

02-04

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20

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dandy Andy Bows Out
by
Jay Jaffe

02-03

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4

BP Unfiltered: Pettitte Set to Retire
by
R.J. Anderson

12-16

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35

Spinning Yarn: Why The Yankees Need Andy Pettitte
by
Mike Fast

11-19

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9

Warning Track Power: To Play Or Not To Play: Pitcher Edition
by
Chase Gharrity

09-15

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4

On the Beat: Ready for a Return
by
John Perrotto

06-05

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9

One-Hoppers: Pettitte on the Ritz
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-28

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25

World Series Prospectus: Yankees versus Phillies Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

09-10

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9

Workload Worries
by
Christina Kahrl

02-22

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0

Stupid Lawyer Tricks
by
Derek Jacques

02-14

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0

What We Learned
by
Will Carroll

06-27

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Prospectus Game of the Week: Houston Astros at Chicago White Sox, June 23, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

11-16

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Can Of Corn: The Case for Pettitte
by
Dayn Perry

10-22

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0

Prospectus Today: Game Three
by
Joe Sheehan

02-11

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Prospectus Feature: The Yankees' Seven-Man Rotation
by
Nate Silver

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February 14, 2008 12:00 am

What We Learned

0

Will Carroll

However much drama there was, yesterday's action on the Hill left most questions unanswered.

All documents referred to in this piece are available at this link. I will try to be as detailed as possible in referring to the documents when possible.

Ignore, if you can, the hearings themselves. For that, you could use the phrase that some Congressmen found so inexplicable: "It is what it is." There was what appeared to be a clear, partisan divide on the Oversight Committee, with the Democrats, led by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) tending to side with Brian McNamee, and with the Republicans tending to side with Roger Clemens. While the questions tended to be focused on credibility rather than policy, about divining truth rather than evidence, the documents that the Oversight Committee collected between their last hearing and this one are stunning in their breadth and openness. In direct opposition to the Mitchell Report, the Congressional collection comes with such a degree of transparency that it's almost startling. At one point, C.J. Nitkowski is promised that they would attempt to keep his conversation confidential; it wasn't much of an attempt, because his statement in full is available without even the slightest redaction. Whether it was the relatively predictable and unenlightening statements, questions, and answers that are now part of the record, the documents published after the hearing are anything but.

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A rematch of the World Champs and the NL pennant winners is what Derek's clicker dials up this time around.

It's been a busy week for both ballclubs. The Astros had the season debut of seven-time Cy Young Award winner Roger Clemens on Thursday, making the decision to have Clemens go against the Minnesota Twins at home, rather than pitch against the White Sox in Chicago. Clemens was hardly dominant in a game where young phenom Francisco Liriano emerged victorious.

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November 16, 2005 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: The Case for Pettitte

0

Dayn Perry

A look at detailed park factors turns the NL Cy Young race on its head.

However, my prevailing gripe is that Andy Pettitte received short shrift in the chase for the NL Cy Young from credentialed voters and statheads alike. There's a reason for this, and it touches on a larger issue that's of much import. That issue is this: the way we employ park factors in the analytical community is wrongheaded, and it needs to change posthaste.

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I tried to get inside Roger Clemens' head before his last final start, which turned out to be a mistake. I won't do that this time; I have no idea how this being his current final start will affect him. None. I do know that, this being Game Four, it is his final final start. There can't be a next final start unless.you know, I don't even want to imagine what kind of scenarios Bud Selig and Jeffrey Loria might concoct to bring us a Game Eight. I do know that he was up in the zone in his Division Series outing against the Red Sox, which was his seventh or eighth "final start" after his final regular-season start, his final start at Fenway Park (which was only his next to final start at Fenway Park), his final start in the All-Star Game, his final start at Yankee Stadium (also just his next-to-final), his final start in a foreign country, his final start in front of a record-low crowd and his final start with nasty heartburn. This matchup isn't as bad for the Marlins as Mike Mussina was. Clemens works up and down with the splitter and fastball, and has shown a fairly persistent reverse platoon split since joining the Yankees. With a bunch of right-handed hitters who can drive a good fastball but who will chase once they fall behind in the count, Clemens' success will again come down to getting ahead in the count and avoiding leaving his fastball up in the zone. There's not a lot of middle ground here; look for a 3.2-7-6-6-4-2 line, or a 7-4-1-1-2-10 one.

Mention his name in some quarters, however, and be prepared for a torrent of abuse. Mussina has seen his reputation sullied by the vagaries of the support he's received, particularly in the postseason. After last night, his career postseason ERA is 3.06 in 15 starts and one relief appearance, but he has just five postseason wins. In some circles, that's enough to diminish what has been a great career.

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As pitchers and catchers report to sunny climes this week--soon to be joined by hitters, beer vendors, and spring breakers--much will be made of the battle for the five slots in the New York Yankees' starting rotation.

As pitchers and catchers report to sunny climes this week--soon to be joined by hitters, beer vendors, and spring breakers--much will be made of the battle for the five slots in the New York Yankees' starting rotation.

The Yankees, you see, have seven handsomely--paid starters--what hubris!--any of whom could start on opening day for the Newark Bears or the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, or if you give them a mulligan on Sterling Hitchcock, about half the teams in the major leagues. It is the greatest waste of talent, so it would seem, since Ocean's Eleven.

Here is our cast of seven, in most probable order of appearance:

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