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Articles Tagged All-Star Game 

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07-12

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4

Prospectus Feature: The Out-of-Nowhere All-Stars
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-10

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0

BP Toronto
by
Joshua Howsam

07-03

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8

Prospectus Feature: But What If It Did Count?
by
Sam Miller, Rian Watt and Meg Rowley

06-23

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4

Players Prefer Presentation: I Care About All-Star Voting
by
Meg Rowley

08-06

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6

In The Game
by
Jordan Gorosh

07-21

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3

The Week in Quotes: July 14-20, 2014
by
Chris Mosch, Nick Wheatley-Schaller and Nick Bacarella

07-17

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7

Eyewitness Accounts: July 17, 2014
by
BP Prospect Staff

07-16

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18

Pebble Hunting: This Time, We Count
by
Sam Miller

07-16

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21

Staff Discussion
by
BP Staff

07-16

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Being There
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-14

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8

Notes About Baseball, 7/14
by
Rocco DeMaro

07-14

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 491: Improving All-Star Week
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-14

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16

Pebble Hunting: How to Gamble on the Home Run Derby
by
Sam Miller

07-11

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5

2014 Futures Game Preview
by
Ron Shah

07-10

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9

2014 Futures Game Preview
by
Ron Shah

07-09

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7

Skewed Left: What the CBA Says About the All-Star Game
by
Zachary Levine

07-18

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4

Pebble Hunting: The Best Pitches Thrown This Week
by
Sam Miller

07-17

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1

Pitcher Profile: Speeding Up at the Break
by
Harry Pavlidis

07-17

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6

What You Need to Know: The AL Comes Up Aces
by
Daniel Rathman

07-16

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8

BP Unfiltered: The LOL-Time Home Run Derby Team
by
Sam Miller

07-16

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 244: Thoughts on the Home Run Derby and the All-Star Game/The Real Home Run Record
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-10

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 240: Several of the Finest Listener Emails
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-08

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 238: Picking the Worst-All Stars Possible/Josh Hamilton's Tobacco Turnaround
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-21

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 229: Derek Jeter, Yasiel Puig, and the All-Star Game/The Royals and Blaming the Ballpark
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-04

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0

BP Unfiltered: FourSixtyThree: The Baltimore Bounce
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-07

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 197: Our Incredibly Premature All-Star Picks
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

02-21

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20

In A Pickle: All-Stars Are Not All Stars
by
Jason Wojciechowski

07-16

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19

Bizball: Playing the MLB All-Star Game Television Ratings Game
by
Maury Brown

07-16

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32

Out of Left Field: Not Fixing the All-Star Game
by
Matthew Kory

07-12

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5

BP Unfiltered: MVPs Who Weren't All-Stars
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-12

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33

On the Beat: The Great Trout vs. Harper Debate
by
John Perrotto

07-11

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8

The Platoon Advantage: Fixing the Worst Days of the Baseball Season
by
Michael Bates

07-11

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25

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Willie Mays’ House of Pancakes
by
Jason Parks

07-06

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Ten Days, One Column
by
Joe Sheehan

07-05

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6

The Lineup Card: Nine All-Star Snubs
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-28

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24

On the Beat: Picking the All-Stars
by
John Perrotto

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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27

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Golden Era Ballot for the Hall of Fame
by
Jay Jaffe

11-03

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2

The Lineup Card: 9 World Series Heroes: The Year After
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-26

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40

The Lineup Card: 13 Bad Players Who Are (or Were) Still Fun to Watch and Root For
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-13

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48

The Lineup Card: Cult Favorites: 18 Non-Star Ballplayers Who Should be Better Remembered
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-13

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3

On the Beat: Straight from the Commissioner
by
John Perrotto

07-07

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10

The BP Wayback Machine: State of the Game
by
Joe Sheehan

06-30

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Un-Stars
by
James Click

06-08

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18

Clubhouse Confidential: Speaking from Experience
by
Marc Carig

01-12

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part II
by
David Laurila

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

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Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly.

By the end of the season my Out-Of-Nowhere All-Stars may look more like Small-Sample-Size All-Stars or Impending-Regression All-Stars, but such is life evaluating players based on the first half. My goal here is pretty simple: Identify the players at each position with the best first halves and the lowest expectations. That’s admittedly subjective and leaves out some actual All-Stars who surprised, but my focus is on role players, waiver claims, journeymen, non-prospects, trade throw-ins, and after-thoughts doing great work for the first time.

Catcher: Chris Herrmann, Arizona Diamondbacks
PECOTA 90th Percentile OPS: .757 | First-Half OPS: .864

While in the Twins’ farm system, Herrmann was viewed as a marginal prospect because his bat wasn’t good enough for him to be a regular corner outfielder and his glove wasn’t good enough for him to be a regular catcher. Sold separately a bad-hitting corner outfielder and a bad-fielding catcher have little value, but when combined the Twins liked Herrmann enough to give him nearly 400 plate appearances from 2012-2015. He was awful, hitting .181/.249/.280 for a .529 OPS that ranked dead last among all big leaguers with at least 350 plate appearances during that time. He also wasn’t much better in the minors, hitting .261/.336/.391 in 152 games at Triple-A.

When the Twins traded Herrmann in November it seemed shocking that they were able to snag anything resembling a decent prospect in return. That prospect, Triple-A outfielder Daniel Palka, currently has the second-most homers in the minor leagues, but Herrmann halted most mockery of the trade by hitting .291/.353/.511 in 52 games for Arizona. His defensive numbers still aren’t pretty, but he’s started 28 games as a catcher along with seeing time in all three outfield spots. Wilson Ramos, another ex-Twins prospect who made the actual All-Star team for the Nationals, is the only big-league catcher with at least 150 plate appearances and a higher OPS.


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July 10, 2016 6:00 am

BP Toronto

0

Joshua Howsam

If you're gonna talk about a Bugs Bunny changeup, you'd best bring Bugs Bunny gifs.

Paste post text here

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Imagining an All-Star game that was For The Win, not for the special interest groups (and fans).

Baseball would like you to care about the outcome of its midsummer All-Star game, because watching baseball that doesn’t count is like eating food by going “numnumnum” while pretending to stuff your face with the Play-Doh hot dog that a child handed to you. The obstacle to this is the way the game is, by tradition, played: Not remotely in the style of a team interested in winning.

So the premise of this article is to imagine a fantastical world where This Time It Really Actually Counts, i.e. the losing manager gets dropped off a pier. Rian Watt will be managing the NL team; I, Sam Miller, will be managing the AL team. (Meg Rowley will pass judgment on us both at the bottom.) There are no rules or limitations imposed on us, except a) those of baseball at large (e.g. no spitballs, no axe attacks), b) common sense pragmatism (e.g. no threatening to drop your players off a pier as motivational tactic), and c) every major-league team must be represented by at least one player on the roster. Everything else is the manager’s call. Here are our strategies, which were written with no knowledge of the other manager’s strategies—and, because of the demands of our publication schedule, no knowledge of Clayton Kershaw's disabledness.

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Which we're not supposed to do.

I should care about other things.

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August 6, 2014 6:00 am

In The Game

6

Jordan Gorosh

One of the prospect team's most recent hires examines what he has learned.

A long time ago, my father told me, “Son, be the dumbest guy in the room, maybe you’ll learn something.” That message has always stuck with me, and I try to apply it to baseball as often as possible. Whether I’m sitting next to scouts at a minor-league game, or working with the rest of the prospect team here at Baseball Prospectus, I’m always learning and adapting.

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Pipe Balls, the Home Run Derby Anti-Curse, and the craziest unwritten rule we've ever heard.

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Eyes on Dylan Bundy, Robert Stephenson, Vincent Velasquez, J.P. Crawford, Francisco Mejia, and Bradley Zimmer.

Dylan Bundy

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July 16, 2014 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: This Time, We Count

18

Sam Miller

Putting the focus on the focus on Jeter, and other All-Star observations.

One of our writers, Craig Goldstein, had an idea for the All-Star game that we didn’t get to, though I thought it had some merit: Which All-Star games have “belonged” to which players? Last year’s “belonged” to Mariano Rivera, for instance. Cal Ripken’s final game “belonged” to Cal Ripken, and so on. This year’s belonged to Derek Jeter like nothing in baseball has ever belonged to anything else. Bud Selig’s retirement was limited to a two-question commercial-break interruption. Tony Gwynn’s death was not even mentioned, not once. Neither was the death of Ralph Kiner. There was no aside noting that Tim McCarver was enjoying retirement after calling more All-Star games with Joe Buck than any broadcast duo in history. This was all Jeter’s.

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July 16, 2014 6:00 am

Staff Discussion

21

BP Staff

Today sucks. Do something about it. Somebody do something about it.

It used to be that there was a day of inactivity after the All-Star break. We complained and we moaned, but we understood that a day, one day, is tolerable. Now there are two days, which is great if you're an All-Star traveling to your next road trip but more silence than most of us are into. We, as a staff, discussed some possibilities to distract us on the Wednesday after the All-Star game.

1. Play the Futures Game.
Why/How: It was late afternoon this year, but some years, it overlaps with up to 14 different games, which means that an audience of 420,000ish fans who presumably watch baseball (because they're at a baseball game) can't watch. Also, it's competing against those teams' television audiences, which is very dumb. Making it the Sunday night game would be okay, but I like moving it to one of the blank nights so it can get the evening to itself. Bonus benefit: The marquee players would be able to remain with their minor-league teams for the weekend games, which in a lot of cities are the only games people attend.


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The eternal spectacle of a farewell All-Star appearance.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

On July 15, 2001, Baseball Prospectus published the following feature on the 2001 All-Star game. Derek Zumsteg wrote from the stands, where he saw another legendary, Hall of Fame-bound shortstop take a bow, doff his cap, and get a big hit against a suspiciously poorly located fastball from the opposing pitcher. Here's his account of Cal Ripken Jr.'s final All-Star game.

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July 14, 2014 1:29 pm

Notes About Baseball, 7/14

8

Rocco DeMaro

A conversation with the Mets catcher, plus a tour of baseball's outliers and aberrations for the week

The quality of catching in the National League is kind of nuts right now.

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Ben and Sam talk to Zachary Levine about ways that Major League Baseball could make All-Star week better.

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