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Articles Tagged Alfonso Soriano 

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09-11

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3

What You Need to Know: Boston Gets Buchholz Back
by
Daniel Rathman

08-15

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0

What You Need to Know: Soriano Strikes Again
by
Daniel Rathman

07-26

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21

Transaction Analysis: Alfonso Soriano Joins the Worst Right-Handed-Hitting Team of All Time
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-13

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: How Alfonso Soriano Got His Groove Back
by
Sahadev Sharma

08-02

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 12: Sam Walks to His Honda
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-04

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: Worse Than Pujols, NL Edition
by
Jay Jaffe

04-23

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4

Pebble Hunting: Cautiously Sizing Up April Stats
by
Sam Miller

03-01

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16

Prospectus Preview: NL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part I
by
Stephani Bee and Larry Granillo

05-02

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0

Divide and Conquer, NL Central: Parting with a Puma, Welcoming a Walrus
by
Larry Granillo

02-27

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Cubs and the Red Sox
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-25

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0

Extreme Ballclub Makeover
by
John Perrotto

05-09

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0

Morning in Chicago
by
John Perrotto

11-29

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Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

08-02

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Prospectus Hit List: Week of August 2nd
by
Jay Jaffe

08-01

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Prospectus Today: Aftermath
by
Joe Sheehan

07-31

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Will's Mill: The Mill Closes -- 5:00 P.M.
by
Will Carroll

07-27

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Lies, Damned Lies: Playing Matchmaker
by
Nate Silver

08-05

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Prospectus Notebook: Friday Edition
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-28

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Will's Mill: T-Minus Four Days and Counting
by
Will Carroll

05-05

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Lies, Damned Lies: Aging Alfonso
by
Nate Silver

02-17

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Transaction Analysis: February 13-16, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-16

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Prospectus Roundtable: The Rodriguez-for-Soriano Deal
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-28

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Internet Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

09-09

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Prospectus Today: Lineupectomy
by
Joe Sheehan

06-02

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Breaking Balls: Roger Clemens and the Historic No-Decision
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-23

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Internet Baseball Awards: AL Player of the Year
by
Greg Spira

04-18

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Top 40 Prospects In Review: Part Seven
by
Rany Jazayerli

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November 29, 2006 12:00 am

Player Profile

0

Marc Normandin

Perception versus performance in the case of the most richly rewarded free agent on the market this offseason.

Alfonso Soriano hails from San Pedro de Macoris of the Dominican Republic and was signed by the New York Yankees on September 29, 1998. This acquisition came after Soriano played for Hiroshima of the Japanese Eastern League--a Japanese minor league--for three seasons. He signed early enough to participate in the Arizona Fall League in his American baseball debut, and managed to rank third in the AFL in extra-base hits while earning Player of the Week honors twice.

Most of Soriano's first full professional season for the Yankees organization came for Norwich of the Double-A Eastern League, although there was also a short stay for Triple-A Columbus. Soriano was a shortstop initially, but clearly was not going to move Derek Jeter off of the position once he arrived to the major leagues:

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The more things change, the more they stay the same on Ye Olde Hit List, as Jay follows the streaking Tigers and sorts out the contender from pretender.

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August 1, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Aftermath

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Joe Sheehan

The deadline has passed, and now, judgment will be.

With the trade deadline behind us, here's a look at the top ten stories from the extended weekend:

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July 31, 2006 12:00 am

Will's Mill: The Mill Closes -- 5:00 P.M.

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Will Carroll

A postscript to a busy day on which the biggest names stayed put.

The Mill closes up with a flurry of deadline deals, but no "big" deals. Alfonso Soriano is still a National, Miguel Tejada is still an Oriole, Brad Lidge and Roy Oswalt are still Astros, and the Angels...well, they'll be praying, I guess.

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July 27, 2006 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Playing Matchmaker

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Nate Silver

Three big bats, seven true contenders...Nate sorts out who'd be best served by making a big deal this weekend.

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Notebook closes out the week with looks at the Mets and Rangers.

So are we saying that Mets' GM Omar Minaya is a numbskull, or to put it more gently, a person who could have an educational discussion with Jessica Simpson about Pollo del Mar?

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July 28, 2005 12:00 am

Will's Mill: T-Minus Four Days and Counting

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Will Carroll

You can see the trade deadline from here, and the rumbling won't stop. UPDATED THURSDAY, 9:45 p.m. EDT.

July 27 Mill

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The Rangers are off to a torrid start this year, thanks in part to the contributions of Alfonso Soriano (.321/.357/.472 after Monday night's victory over Tampa Bay). Soriano has undergone a couple of changes since his last incarnation as the undisciplined Yankee second baseman whose terrible second-half and postseason campaigns were enough to trigger Bronx Jeers at his every at-bat. The switch from the neo-classical, interlocking N-Y to the tacky, scarlet T on his uniform breast is the most obvious, but Soriano has also changed batting order positions (Buck Showalter has him hitting third, instead of first, a role that he is considerably better suited for). He's also switched birthdays--or at least, birthyears. Turns out that A-Sore was born on the 7th of January, 1976, and not the same date in 1978, as he was previously listed. John Hart and the Rangers knew full well about the change in birthdate before agreeing to acquire Soriano for Alex Rodriguez. Indeed, baseball teams--and baseball fans--have grown pretty well used to these sorts of surprises; before Soriano, there were only a few hundred other players whose reported birthdates were revealed to be incorrect. With a few exceptions like Bartolo Colon, however, most of those guys were marginal prospects in the lower minors, and not an established star like Soriano, for whom any change in expected performance could potentially cost his club the equivalent of millions of dollars in value.

Soriano has undergone a couple of changes since his last incarnation as the undisciplined Yankee second baseman whose terrible second-half and postseason campaigns were enough to trigger Bronx Jeers at his every at-bat. The switch from the neo-classical, interlocking N-Y to the tacky, scarlet T on his uniform breast is the most obvious, but Soriano has also changed batting order positions (Buck Showalter has him hitting third, instead of first, a role that he is considerably better suited for). He's also switched birthdays--or at least, birthyears. Turns out that A-Sore was born on the 7th of January, 1976, and not the same date in 1978, as he was previously listed.

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February 17, 2004 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: February 13-16, 2004

0

Christina Kahrl

John Burkett says goodbye. The Twins win their arbitration case against Johan Santana. The A's sign Chad Bradford for another year. Oh, yeah...and apparently the Yankees and Rangers traded infielders or something.

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Gary Huckabay: OK, the deal's not finalized yet, but just for a second, let's assume that the worst possible parameters of the deal (from the Rangers' perspective) reported in the media are true. The Rangers get Alfonso Soriano, a minor leaguer from a list of five, and pick up $67 million of the remaining money owed to Rodriguez. Do you see any way to justify this deal from the Rangers' standpoint? Personally, I don't. Soriano's not going to be exceptionally cheap himself, he's not close to being the ballplayer A-Rod is, and even if you assume--which I'm not comfortable doing--that A-Rod's contract is anomalous and an organizational albatross, there's certainly some real and non-negligible cost associated with this specific dump. Depending on the financial details of the deal, it's possible this deal could end up costing the Rangers money--when you factor in the $67 million, the contract Soriano will likely end up with after a year of puffy stats at The Ballpark in Arlington, the lost goodwill, and lost broadcast rights money.

Gary Huckabay: OK, the deal's not finalized yet, but just for a second, let's assume that the worst possible parameters of the deal (from the Rangers' perspective) reported in the media are true. The Rangers get Alfonso Soriano, a minor leaguer from a list of five, and pick up $67 million of the remaining money owed to Rodriguez.

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October 28, 2003 12:00 am

Internet Baseball Awards

0

Ryan Wilkins

As many of our readers were submitting their ballots for the annual Internet Baseball Awards, 11 Baseball Prospectus authors went into the polling booths themselves, voicing their opinions on who should win the major baseball awards this year. Here are the results...

As many of our readers were submitting their ballots for the annual Internet Baseball Awards, 11 Baseball Prospectus authors went into the polling booths themselves, voicing their opinions on who should win the major baseball awards this year. Here are the results:

National League Player of the Year

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September 9, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Lineupectomy

0

Joe Sheehan

I could talk about roster/lineup/role optimization all day, which is just one of the many reasons it's a wonder I'm married. Back in the nascent days of baseballprospectus.com, I wrote a column called Lineupectomy (a couple of which actually show up in the archives), which got its name from something we used to do at Strat tournaments--taking people's teams and creating optimal lineups. It's a geek thing, and as has been pointed out, not remotely the right name for the process, but it's something I spend a lot of time doing. There's a question as to how much the effort matters. It's something of a stathead truth that the difference between the optimal lineup and a reasonably constructed one is small, less than a win per year. I don't necessarily buy that; as Chris Kahrl pointed out in BP2K1, the simulations on which that idea is based are fairly old, done on ancient technology, and it's possible that we just haven't been able to model it properly yet. I find it hard to believe that doing simple things like getting your OBP guys in front of your SLG guys, making the lineup less vulnerable to attack relievers, and minimizing double plays aren't worthwhile endeavors that can add not just a few runs, but a few wins a year. My thought process on the Yankees goes something like this: they have seven good hitters, so one of those seven ends up at the back of the line. Ideally, you'd like that to be the worst of the seven, but that's complicated by the fact that players don't change roles as easily as Strat cards, and the collective media and fan base is poised to make a very big deal over any radical changes. Ask Theo Epstein.

The last question I answered was about the Yankees:

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