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Articles Tagged Alex Rodriguez 

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07-11

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 241: Manny Ramirez and Other Players Who Refuse to Retire/The Loveable, Hateable Yankees
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-05

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20

Bizball: Suspensions May Loom for Players Connected to Biogenesis Clinic
by
Maury Brown

01-22

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 123: How Far Away Are the Astros?/The MLBPA is Mad at the Marlins/Is A-Rod's Surgery Suspicious?/The Future of Baseball on the Radio
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

12-05

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16

BP Unfiltered: A Collection of Third Basemen Useful for Your Next Yankees Joke
by
Sam Miller

12-03

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7

BP Unfiltered: Brian Cashman Press Conference Highlights UPDATED
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-03

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8

BP Unfiltered: Alex Rodriguez is Injured Again
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-29

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12

Playoff Prospectus: World Series (and Postseason) Recap
by
Sam Miller

10-19

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 66: Performing a Post-Mortem on the Yankees
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Bronx Mayhem
by
Joe Sheehan

10-18

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16

BP Unfiltered: Who is to Blame for The Yankees' Season, As Decided By Daily News Readers
by
Sam Miller

10-17

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 64: Should Joe Girardi Have Pinch-Hit in Game Three?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-16

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30

Out of Left Field: Trading A-Rod: How, Where, and Why
by
Matthew Kory

10-11

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 60: Ibanez Pinch-Hits for A-Rod/The Strasburg Debate That Won't Die
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-11

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12

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three Recap: Yankees 3, Orioles 2
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-27

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9

Overthinking It: The Injuries That Decided Divisions
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-27

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11

In A Pickle: Free to Be We
by
Jason Wojciechowski

07-13

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18

Overthinking It: The Rapid Aging of A-Rod
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-20

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6

BP Unfiltered: Yankees Fans Gloating About Home Runs: The Sequel
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-11

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4

The Prospectus Hit List: Friday, May 11
by
Matthew Kory

04-21

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0

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for April 20
by
Larry Granillo

04-03

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3

Painting the Black: 2012 Milestones Watch
by
R.J. Anderson

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

02-15

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: Inspecting the Spectrum, Part I: The Cold Corner, Again
by
Jay Jaffe

07-11

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29

Prospectus Hit and Run: Heroes and Villains
by
Jay Jaffe

07-01

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50

All-Star Selections
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-31

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42

Pre-Season Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-08

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68

Future Shock: Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-31

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3

The Year in Quotes
by
Alex Carnevale

11-02

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28

Prospectus Today: A-Rodemption?
by
Joe Sheehan

06-22

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15

Struggling Superstar
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-23

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0

The Week In Quotes: February 16-22
by
Alex Carnevale

02-23

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43

Lies, Damned Lies: Chasing Bonds
by
Nate Silver

02-16

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9

The Week In Quotes: February 9-15
by
Alex Carnevale

02-09

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139

Prospectus Today: Stupid Media Tricks
by
Joe Sheehan

04-03

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-21

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4

Lies, Damned Lies: The Best Player in Baseball, Part Two
by
Nate Silver

04-24

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0

Prospectus Today: A-Rod 200?
by
Joe Sheehan

04-01

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-23

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: New York Yankees @ Boston Red Sox, 8/20/06
by
Derek Jacques

05-30

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Prospectus Game of the Week: New York Yankees @ Detroit Tigers, 5/29/2006
by
Derek Jacques

03-30

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-31

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-14

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0

Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

04-06

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0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-17

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0

Breaking Balls: The Price of Diplomacy
by
Derek Zumsteg

12-19

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0

The A-Rod Negotiations
by
Doug Pappas

12-18

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0

Prospectus Today: The A-Rod Mess
by
Joe Sheehan

10-28

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0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

08-01

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0

Breaking Balls: Don't Take a Slice of My Pie
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-07

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0

Prospectus Today: Roto Madness
by
Joe Sheehan

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Ben and Sam discuss Game Three of the Yankees-Orioles ALDS, the decision to pinch-hit for Alex Rodriguez, and A-Rod's future in New York, then talk about why the Stephen Strasburg debate won't go away.

Ben and Sam discuss Game Three of the Yankees-Orioles ALDS, the decision to pinch-hit for Alex Rodriguez, and A-Rod's future in New York, then talk about why the Stephen Strasburg debate won't go away.

Episode 60: "Ibanez Pinch-Hits for A-Rod/The Strasburg Debate That Won't Die"

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October 11, 2012 10:50 am

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three Recap: Yankees 3, Orioles 2

12

Ben Lindbergh

In the defining move of his career, Joe Girardi went with his gut. It worked.

The questions addressed to Joe Girardi in his pre-game press conference looked a lot like the ones he fielded several hours later, after the Yankees had come from behind to beat Baltimore 3-2 in 12 innings and take a 2-1 series lead. Both times, the emphasis was on Alex Rodriguez, with a bit of Raul Ibanez. Girardi’s responses about A-Rod earlier in the day weren’t very revealing. But by the time the second presser started, the questions almost didn’t have to be asked. Girardi’s in-game actions had already supplied the answers.

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September 27, 2012 3:42 pm

Overthinking It: The Injuries That Decided Divisions

9

Ben Lindbergh

Health can play a big part in which teams win and which go home. In the AL East and AL Central, lost WARP can help explain the standings.

Driven by deep data sets, sophisticated technology, and collaboration between skilled statistical and scouting staffs, major-league teams have become increasingly adept at projecting player performance. In some respects, assembling a roster is the easy part of building a winning team. The hard part is making sure that roster remains intact. Speaking at Internet Week in New York earlier this year, Athletics General Manager Billy Beane stressed the importance of predicting and preventing injuries:

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September 27, 2012 5:00 am

In A Pickle: Free to Be We

11

Jason Wojciechowski

A forgettable book raises a timeless question.

The "we" debate is a weirdly durable one among those of us who enjoy meta-baseball arguments, those fights that aren't so much about the game as they are about how we interact with it. You'll see the topic spring up on Twitter every so often, as surely as you will discussion of the serial comma, The Wave, and whether Budweiser is an acceptable alternative to water for adult humans. By "the 'we' debate," I mean the question of whether it is "OK" for fans to refer to a team as "we." "We won last night, but it was awfully close;" "We need some power in the heart of the order if we're going to make any noise in the playoffs;" "We stink."

My experience of the two sides of the debate is that many people feel strongly that the "we" is illegitimate, a putting on airs, a usurpation of the rightful ownership of the victories of the men who actually play the game. Those who say "we," by contrast, seem often to not be wedded to the word so much as they are following long-formed mental pathways. They know they're not on the team, and I imagine most of them will admit that no matter how loud they cheer, they don't really have any effect on the field. But they say "we" and they see their use of the word as harmless. The players know full well who drove in the game-winning run, after all, and the first general manager who will be fooled into giving a fan a seven-figure deal to yell real loud hasn't been born yet.


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July 13, 2012 12:00 am

Overthinking It: The Rapid Aging of A-Rod

18

Ben Lindbergh

Alex Rodriguez had an extraordinary prime, but he's aging much more like an average player, and that's not good news for the Yankees.

When Major League Baseball’s All-Stars convened in Kansas City earlier this week, one notable name was nowhere to be found: Alex Rodriguez. Rodriguez has been an All-Star 14 times, more than any other active player. He leads all active players in career value, according to traditional stats (HR, R, RBI) and advanced stats (WARP) alike. Only a handful of players in history have done as much to help their teams win. But career accomplishments mean only so much. To be considered one of the best players in baseball, you have to continue to play like one. And lately, A-Rod hasn’t looked a lot like an All-Star.

Rodriguez won his third AL MVP award in 2007. Since then, his performance has declined in five straight seasons. Most players can expect to see their numbers take a tumble after an MVP season, but A-Rod’s decline goes beyond routine regression. He’s not coming back down to earth. He’s falling off the face of it.

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Jason Heyward gets an earful from Yankees fans in right field after an Alex Rodriguez homer.

Interesting things happen when home runs are hit to the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium. In Game 4 of the 2010 ALCS, Robinson Cano hit a home run there, just beyond the reach of Rangers right fielder Nelson Cruz. That home run made the score 1-0, Yankees. The Rangers went on to win the game 10-3, so the home run itself was meaningless. (Well, it might have had meaning for Cano). But the aftermath of the home run made animated GIF history:

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May 11, 2012 9:18 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Friday, May 11

4

Matthew Kory

The Astros have playoff odds that are not zero!

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The tater trots for April 20: two inside-the-park home runs, plus an invalid trot from David Ortiz!

What do you do when two different players each hit an inside-the-park home run on the same night? Normally, one is good enough for Home Run of the Day, but how do you choose? And what if they both come on a once-in-a-century day where two storied teams are wearing fantastic uniforms from generations past while celebrating the birthday of a park like Fenway? Especially when there are six different home runs in that game? And let's not forget a pair of home runs from last year's sad sack story Adam Dunn, or home run number 631(good enough for fifth all-time) from Alex Rodriguez?

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Looking ahead to baseball's most significant personal achievements.

Something peculiar happened during the most recent National Football League season: four quarterbacks threw for more than 4,900 yards. An unprecedented event given that two quarterbacks had accomplished the feat in 30 years theretofore. The increased reliance on, and perfection of, the forward pass has led to an assault on the record books, akin to the earlier offensive explosion in baseball. There are no rumblings of wrongdoing in football—at least, around these new levels of performance—but then again, there weren’t during the early phases of baseball’s offensive breakout, either. Even heading forward, don’t expect a congressional hearing, or columnists pontificating about lost innocence while urging a nation to grieve and revolt. Because, as one intrepid—and sadly, unremembered—soul put it: nobody cares about football stats.

The inverse is true of baseball statistics. Anyone reading Prospectus is no stranger to numbers, or to the countless reasons why people are attracted to baseball’s numbers. At some point the large, round numbers became in-built measuring sticks. If a player hit 500 home runs over his career he must have been one of the best sluggers in history. A player with 3,000 hits or 300 wins demonstrated the perfect equilibrium between longevity and quality throughout his career. Exceptions existed before science entered the picture, but these rules were simple—and simple sells.

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February 20, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview

19

R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

Roundtable discussion of the most pressing issues facing each AL East team entering Spring Training

PECOTA Team Projections
Record: 72-90
Team WARP: 21.0
Team TAv: .264
Runs Scored: 701
Runs Allowed: 798
Team FRAA: -11.4







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While third base is often considered an offense-heavy position now, last year proved to be a major down season.

As so often happens, my recent Replacement-Level Killers and Vortices of Suck miniseries have focused my attention on the landscape of offensive production at each position. Back in July, while putting together the midseason Killers, I was struck by just how awful a year it had been for third basemen. Age, injuries, and mysterious slumps had sapped the production of so many hot cornermen that their collective True Average (.253) trailed that of second basemen (.256)—a seven-point swing from the year before, a change that couldn't simply be explained by Chone Figgins' switch in positions. As someone who internalized Bill James' defensive spectrum before I was old enough to drive, this anomaly fascinated me.

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July 11, 2011 10:32 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Heroes and Villains

29

Jay Jaffe

Jay discusses the similar careers and 2011 seasons of David Ortiz and Alex Rodriguez, questioning their respective labels of hero and villain.

Once upon a time, their roles were unmistakable, the storylines obvious. David Ortiz was the hero of the underdog Red Sox. Benevolent, affable, even beloved, and of course, clutch. Alex Rodriguez was the villain, the epitome of the so-called "Evil Empire," at least after a certain trade fell through. Self-centered, publicly awkward, often loathed, and of course, unclutch. Seven seasons removed from when those narratives began taking shape, their roles are changing, perhaps faster than their public perceptions.

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