CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

World Series time! Enjoy Premium-level access to most features through the end of the Series!

Articles Tagged 2011 Draft Picks 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 5, 2012 12:00 am

Future Shock: Don't You Forget About Me

7

Kevin Goldstein

Some draftees don't hit the short-season leagues until the year after they're drafted, making them easy to forget about. Don't.

With the short-season leagues beginning in June, it's a nice reminder that not every prospect is a Bryce Harper or a Mike Trout who will get to the big leagues in no time. For most, it's a slow and steady process with any number of bumps in the road along the way. For many 2011 draftees, the short-season leagues represent their first chance to show up in box scores, so here's an all Don't You Forget About Me team comprised of some high picks from last June who are just now getting their careers going.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Our first look inside the new Collective Bargaining Agreement.

This is Part 1 of a multi-part series on the latest Collective Bargaining Agreement

On November 22 of last year, Major League Baseball and the MLBPA did something that the NFL and the NBA could not: reached a new labor agreement without a work stoppage. For those that follow baseball’s labor history, it has become a miraculous run. By the time the current five-year Basic Agreement (read here) expires on December 1, 2016, it will have been 21 years of uninterrupted labor peace.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Now that we've had some time to reflect on the new CBA's rules about the amateur draft, does it still seem like death to small-market teams?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Dustin Palmateer once played division III junior college baseball, finishing with a career batting average below the Mendoza Line. He now writes about the game. You can reach him via email.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 28, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects

13

Kevin Goldstein

A weak Brewers system improved following the 2011 draft, but that might not be saying much

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 10, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: New York Mets Top 11 Prospects

33

Kevin Goldstein

A once-barren Mets system is beginning to look much better under Sandy Alderson

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

As the Mets embark upon an uncertain rebuilding phase, they're putting their faith in young pitchers, as they've done before.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jonathan Bernhardt is a freelance writer born in Baltimore who lives and works in New York City. He is an occasional contributor to the Et tu, Mr. Destructo? blog.

Read the full article...

The new CBA makes many changes, most of them positive, but small-market teams may find that it makes their chances of competing even slimmer.

Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association unveiled the latest collective bargaining agreement yesterday afternoon, and it brings numerous changes, many of them major.

Read the full article...

In part two, Rany examines just how important age is for a draft pick.

Yesterday’s column made the claim that small differences in age among high school hitters can have a dramatic impact on their return as draft picks. Today, I intend to prove that claim.

Read the full article...

One of BP's co-founders returns to reveal an important amateur draft inefficiency.

Everyone missed on Mike Trout. Don’t get me wrong: Trout was a well-regarded player headed into the 2009 draft, a certain first-round talent. But he wasn’t—yet—a phenom. Everyone liked Trout; it’s just that no one loved him. Baseball America ranked him as the 22nd-best player in the draft. No one doubted his athleticism or his work ethic; a lot of people doubted the level of competition he faced as a high school player from rural New Jersey. The Angels drafted him with the 25th pick overall, and they’ll tell you today that they knew he was destined to be a special player. What they won’t tell you is that they had back-to-back picks at #24 and #25, and they announced Randal Grichuk’s name first.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

March 15, 2011 9:00 am

Fantasy Beat: Expert Mock Draft Results

44

Jason Collette

Jason took part in a slow mock draft with other fantasy experts and is now here to share what he learned from the experience.

I recently had the pleasure of doing a slow—and I mean slow—mock draft over the past four weeks with a few of my friends and colleagues in the fantasy baseball industry. That group included most of the mlb.com folks, Fernando DiFino, and the legendary Joe Sheehan. The draft started on February 17 and survived a few lost weekends, DiFino’s nuptials (congrats!) and several copy and paste issues from some of us that are still using not-so-smartphones.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 14, 2011 9:00 am

Ahead in the Count: Battle for the Beltway

36

Matt Swartz

In the Nationals' and Orioles' battle for the local fan base, the team that blinks first may stand to gain the most.

This past month, I moved back up I-95 from Washington to Philadelphia, where I’d spent all but the previous eighteen months of my life. There has been only one major-league franchise in the City of Brotherly Love since the Athletics forsook Philly in 1955, but as I discovered during my sojourn in the District, many baseball fans in the DC area have been torn between the Baltimore Orioles, for whom many of them grew up cheering, and the Washington Nationals, who emigrated from Montreal in 2005. Neither team has been good during their years of geographic coexistence, and the metropolitan area has not seen a playoff game since 1997, but both teams have slowly begun to develop the young talent necessary to compete. Although animosity stemming from Orioles owner Peter Angelos’ opposition to a Washington franchise has cost the O’s some fans, many in the DC area have yet to determine their allegiance.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

June 21, 2010 2:00 pm

Fantasy Beat: Scoresheet: Draft Prep 1

4

Rob McQuown

Rob McQuown's first installment of Scoresheet draft candidates for tomorrow's draft contains 20 names and some theory for smart drafting.

This author's introduction to Scoresheet baseball was charmed, taking over an abandoned team in the “NL 300” league last July which had the first pick in the June draft. For those who play Scoresheet, it's well-known that the draft which follows the MLB Rule 4 Draft is the strongest, as this is when the new talent is made available. Watching the league's first overall pick from last year, Stephen Strasburg, pitch, “charmed” may be understating things. For those unaccustomed to playing Scoresheet baseball, some background is required:

The aforementioned “NL 300” league purportedly contains only National League players (those players whose rights are owned by a National League MLB team). Scoresheet also offers AL and BL (both leagues) teams. The standard configuration is 12 teams in an NL league, which is what “NL 300” has. It's a strong league, having been around for many years, and the rules allow for 2 “crossover” players to be kept in addition to NL players. The standard configuration allows teams to keep many players from year-to-year, with no salary considerations. However, players with MLB experience (beyond “rookie” status) must be kept using one of the team's top 13 picks, while “rookies” can be safely protected using the latter picks. A hypothetical pre-2010 keeper list for a strong NL team might look like:

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries