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Articles Tagged 2002 World Series 

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11-03

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2

The Lineup Card: 9 World Series Heroes: The Year After
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-25

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5

Pebble Hunting: Baseball's Brief History of Headline Puns
by
Sam Miller

10-19

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3

Wezen-Ball: Some World Series Thoughts
by
Larry Granillo

10-06

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Is the Best of Five the Worst of Series?
by
Mike Carminati

06-08

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5

The Asian Equation: The Futile Quest for the Next Ichiro
by
Michael Street

11-03

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14

World Series Prospectus: Series Notebook
by
Jay Jaffe

11-02

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3

World Series Prospectus: Game Five Report
by
John Perrotto

10-27

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15

On the Beat: Back for More
by
John Perrotto

10-28

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15

On the Beat: World Series News
by
John Perrotto

06-28

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29

Prospectus Idol Entry: The First World Series Turncoat
by
Matt Swartz

10-28

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: (Near) Hitless Wonders
by
Jay Jaffe

10-29

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0

Playoff Prospectus: World Series Game Four Report
by
John Perrotto

10-24

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Playoff Prospectus: Rockies versus Red Sox
by
Nate Silver

10-23

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Prospectus Matchups: Series Firsts
by
Jim Baker

10-05

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Prospectus Matchups: Getting Right Back on the Horse
by
Jim Baker

09-19

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The Big Picture: Thoughts on the Postseason
by
David Pinto

11-02

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Is the Best of Five the Worst of Series?
by
Mike Carminati

10-20

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Playoff Prospectus: Have You Ever Been Experienced?
by
Mike Carminati

10-14

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Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-12

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Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

09-08

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0

Prospectus Hit List
by
Jay Jaffe

07-05

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1

Lies, Damned Lies: More on Elo
by
Nate Silver

10-21

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Prospectus Matchups: Feels Like the First Time
by
Jim Baker

10-17

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Prospectus Today: The Last Doubleheader
by
Joe Sheehan

10-13

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Unlikely Heroes, Past and Present
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-29

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Predicting the Playoffs
by
Doug Pappas

04-09

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The Great Slide Backwards
by
Mark Armour

01-24

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Prospectus Feature: That's the Chicago Way
by
Keith Scherer

10-30

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The Daily Prospectus: Where Have You Gone, Enn Raudsepp?
by
Jonah Keri

10-28

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The Week in Quotes: October 14-27
by
Derek Zumsteg

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A look at how World Series icons performed after their October heroics

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A trip through online archives reveals that the history of baseball's pun-happy headlines isn't as old as that of the game itself.

Peripheral vascular disease is what is known as a disease of affluence. Such diseases tend to correlate positively to a society’s wealth, so that a rising standard of living causes greater incidence of the disease. Peripheral vascular disease—which creates a narrowing of the arteries that supply the legs, and resulting pain, swelling and discoloration—is caused by hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, and obesity, all of which are also diseases of affluence. Asthma is a disease of affluence. Gout is a disease of affluence.

Puns in baseball headlines are a disease of affluence. One hundred years ago, nobody would have ever thought to use a headline like this:

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Some quick thoughts on the upcoming World Series between the Rangers and Cardinals.

The World Series is upon us. St. Louis vs. Texas, squirrels vs. antlers, Tony LaRussa vs. Ron Washington, Albert Pujols vs. the World. As anyone who read my progressively more desperate dispatches from the NLCS last week can tell you, this was not the matchup I was rooting for. If things had gone my way, the Brewers would be hosting the Series beginning tonight and my Thursday night - with a pair of Game 2 World Series tickets - would already be planned.

Sadly, the Brewers lost to the Cardinals in Game 6 Sunday night in an ugly fashion. I was travelling all weekend, so I didn't have a chance to write about the game, but that's probably for the best. It would not have been a happy piece. Instead, I've allowed myself to move past the loss and remember the Brewers' 2011 season for the joyous thrillride that it was. I hope all other Brewers fans have been able to do the same.

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As three series head to Game Fives, we dig up an investigation of the five-game format's fairness.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

As we prepare for the three remaining Division Series to be decided, revisit Mike Carminati's case for switching to a longer series format, which originally ran on November 2, 2006.


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June 8, 2011 9:00 am

The Asian Equation: The Futile Quest for the Next Ichiro

5

Michael Street

In his third column on Japanese-American player movement, Michael looks at the position players who followed in the wake of the unique Ichiro Suzuki.

Thus far in the Asian Equation series, I’ve explained the early history of Japanese-American baseball traffic which lead to the posting system and the signing of Ichiro Suzuki, who is among the most idiosyncratic players in either league. As we discussed in the comments section, the success of one unique player from Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) doesn’t mean that all of them can succeed, a logical fallacy that has eluded many baseball executives.

Although the feeding frenzy has declined lately, the last decade was marked by many teams gambling on the next Eastern import, hoping for another Ichiro to take them to the next level. A few players have succeeded, collecting World Series rings and postseason acclaim, but many of them have simply survived—a dream for any player, but not what the general managers were laying out serious cash for.

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November 3, 2010 12:00 pm

World Series Prospectus: Series Notebook

14

Jay Jaffe

Wrapping up the Fall Classic with some quick hits about the Giants and Rangers.

The 2010 World Series is in the books with the Giants having won their first world championship since 1954, back when they called Upper Manhattan's Polo Grounds home and no major-league team played ball west of the Mississippi River or south of the Ohio River. While the series certainly provided a handful of memorable moments that shone the spotlight on deserving superstars, unlikely heroes, and freaks with ill-considered beards, this fall classic didn't exactly fall into the “classic” category. For the sixth time in the past seven years and the ninth time in a baker's dozen, the series was over before a Game Six could be played. The team that scored first won every game after Game One, and in fact not a single lead changed hands after the fifth inning in any game. While the match-up may have meant the world to the long-suffering fans of both the Giants and the Rangers (who'd never even won a playoff series before this fall), to those of us without a dog in the hunt, it was notable mostly as the last oasis of baseball for the next three-and-a-half months.

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Edgar Renteria experiences the thrill of a lifetime again as the Giants finally bring a championship to San Francisco.

ARLINGTON—There was never any cute story to go along with the Giants' inability to win a world championship in their first 52 seasons after moving west. No Bambinos or goats for this franchise.

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October 27, 2010 8:00 am

On the Beat: Back for More

15

John Perrotto

Cliff Lee is the same situation for a second straight World Series, along with other news and notes from around the major leagues.

It is the same thing but a different year for Cliff Lee. He is back in the World Series, starting Game One for a team that acquired at midseason with the hopes he could take them to a championship as a potential hired gun.

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October 28, 2009 11:39 am

On the Beat: World Series News

15

John Perrotto

Trophy-laden Tribesmen toe the rubber tonight as foes, the new meaning of staying up late for the postseason, and more.

Six years have passed since the Yankees last played in the World Series, and nine years have gone by since they last won one. However, that does not mean that expectations have changed in the Bronx. When the Yankees host the Phillies tonight in Game One of the World Series at Yankee Stadium, they will do so with the expectation of winning their 27th title.

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Thursday night, the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the Philadelphia Phillies to take the three-game interleague series two games to one. Rematches of the previous year's World Series combatants have been a fascinating byproduct of interleague play. Even more fascinating is the role Pat Burrell plays in this one.

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October 28, 2008 3:24 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: (Near) Hitless Wonders

10

Jay Jaffe

Desperately bad work in the Fall Classic puts Carlos Pena and Evan Longoria in august company.

Zero for 31.

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October 29, 2007 12:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: World Series Game Four Report

0

John Perrotto

Boston's second championship--and second series sweep--in four years is no less special than their memorable win in 2004.

DENVER--Two hours had passed since Jonathan Papelbon enticed Seth Smith to swing through a high fastball to end the game Sunday night. Yet, the celebration on the field at Coors was only just finally starting to break up. Manager Terry Francona, the coaches, and the players began heading back to the dugout, then up the tunnel to the visitors' clubhouse. All had been soaked by the spraying of champagne and beer in a brief clubhouse romp before going back to the field to continue the party with family, friends, and--despite being two time zones away from Red Sox Nation--a group of approximately 5,000 fans who relentlessly chanted and cheered from the lower seating bowl, never coming close to going hoarse. They were in full celebration mode, for the Red Sox had clinched their second World Series title in four years, and seventh in franchise history, holding off the Colorado Rockies 4-3 in Game Four to complete the sweep.

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