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Articles Tagged 2002 AL MVP 

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In honor of Justin Verlander's MVP win, the BP team examines other pitcher MVPs and whether there was a better choice among position players

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A look at who took home the virtual hardware in the junior circuit.

For full results to this year's IBA voting, look here.

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With the votes in, the junior circuit's slate brings us four first-time winners.

Click here for the full results of the voting.

It's time to announce the winners of the 17th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,400 baseball fans from cyberspace participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2008 were most deserving.

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The polls have been closed, the votes are in, and the people have spoken.

Click here for the full results of the voting.

It's time to announce the winners of the 16th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,400 baseball fans from cyberspace participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2007 were most deserving.

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November 2, 2006 12:00 am

Internet Baseball Awards

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Greg Spira

With tight races for the NL Pitcher of the Year and AL Rookie of the Year, it's time to find out who goes home with the virtual gold.

Click here for the full results of the voting.

It's time to announce the winners of the 15th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,400 cyberspace baseball fans participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2006 were most deserving.

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October 31, 2005 12:00 am

Internet Baseball Awards

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Greg Spira

1,300 fans voted in this year's Internet Baseball Awards. Who took home the hardware in the American League?

For complete results, click here.

It's time to announce the winners of the 14th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,300 cyberspace baseball fans participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2005 were most deserving of honors.

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March 21, 2005 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Projects the American League

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Nate Silver

Nate's got a look at how PECOTA sees the American League shaking out, and there are some surprises to discuss.

Let's go very quickly through the ground rules. These standings are based on compiling the PECOTA projections for each team's rosters as listed in the most recent iteration of the team depth charts that are available on our fantasy page. The depth charts attempt to account for playing time over the course of the entire season, rather than just on Opening Day, which should provide an appropriate reward to teams with superior depth. The individual projections are transformed into team runs scored and runs allowed totals by means of a version of the Marginal Lineup Value formula, and the runs scored and runs allowed totals are transformed into wins and losses by means of Pythagenport. A final adjustment is made based on strength of schedule. That's about it. Let's get moving.

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November 11, 2004 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Superstars, All-Stars and Busts

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Nate Silver

Jason Bay and Bobby Crosby have received a considerable honor from the Baseball Writers Association of America. What happened to the 116 players who came before them?

Nevertheless, the two candidates were fairly close. Bay missed more playing time than Greene did, which accounted for some of the difference in VORP. He probably has more star potential than Greene does, though we'll see what PECOTA has to say in a month or two; slow middle infielders like Greene tend not to age very well. The writers have certainly made bigger mistakes, and at the very least, it's hard to chalk this particular one up to some sort of newsprint-fueled hubris; Internet Baseball Awards participants also preferred Bay by a small margin.

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October 22, 2004 12:00 am

Internet Baseball Awards

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Greg Spira

Over 1,500 of you voted. Who did you pick as your AL Player of the Year, Pitcher of the Year Award Winner, Rookie of the Year, and Manager of the Year?

For complete results, click here.

It's time to announce the American League winners of the 13th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,500 cyberspace baseball fans participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2004 were most deserving of honors.

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Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards. The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings. Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP) Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards.

The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings.

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September 5, 2003 12:00 am

They Wuz Robbed

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Mark Armour

There has never been a season when Barry Bonds was obviously the league's best player that he did not win the MVP award. Were he to lose the award this season (he is currently leading in VORP by 17 runs over Albert Pujols) it would be his first real injustice. If Bonds has not been mistreated by MVP voters though, several stars of the past have been. Although it has been 80 years since anyone has hit like Bonds has the past few years, there have been occasions when a player has dominated his league for several years and been ill-served by the voters. The rest of this article briefly discusses a few of the more famous cases. Ted Williams' problem was that he played in a time when it was difficult to win the award without winning the pennant, and his team finished second every year. From 1941 through 1954, Williams led the league in VORP every season that he wasn't either in the military (five years) or hurt (1950). He won two awards: 1946, when the Red Sox finished first, and 1949, when they finished one game behind. Let's run through a few of the more interesting losses:

Leaving aside the 2003 race, which is, after all, still ongoing--and which Bonds might very well win--let's turn our attention to how Barry has been mistreated in the past. To begin with, we have to deal with the fact that Bonds has won the award five times, two more than any other player in history. This is not necessarily a contradiction, of course--if Bonds is the best player in the league every year, then the writers have a responsibility to give him the award every year. Given this, how many MVP awards should Bonds have won?

As you have no doubt gathered, I make no distinction between the "best" player and the "most valuable" player. What could be more valuable than "greatness," after all? The distinction is often used as a crutch; rather than trying to make the case that a candidate is really the best player, one can instead try to cloud the issue with grammatical semantics. We won't do that here.

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April 2, 2003 12:00 am

The Great Leap Forward

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Mark Armour

In a recent article about the 1967 Boston Red Sox, I wrote that the team's 20-win improvement was not particularly unusual. I had spent a few minutes convincing myself that there were a few other teams in neighboring seasons that accomplished the feat, but made no attempt to determine how common it was, or whether the 1960s were particularly unique in this regard. This article delves into the topic quite a bit further, presenting an historical survey of the phenomenon, while contemplating patterns that might help us figure out who is most likely to leap forward this year.

First, we need to explain the methodology. To account for different season lengths, I adjusted all team seasons to 162 games. For illustration, lets look at the largest improvement by a team in baseball history:

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