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Articles Tagged 1975 World Series 

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The final episode of the 1980s show "St. Elsewhere" calls into question the existence of some key baseball moments.

We all remember the celebration in 2004 after the Red Sox won the World Series. The glorification of Curt Schilling and his bloody sock. Johnny Damon and the "Idiots". Cowboying up. Something about Babe Ruth and curses. And then of course there was Jimmy Fallon and Drew Barrymore celebrating on the field.

Or the 1996 Yankees. Derek Jeter introducing himself to the world (and the gift-basket business). Wade Boggs riding around Yankee Stadium on a horse. Mariano Rivera being Mariano Rivera for 107 innings (107!). I'm sure George Steinbrenner said something entertaining as well.

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Leverage Index offers a method of identifying the most dramatic of all post-season series.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Dave Studeman is the manager and primary owner of the Hardball Times.
 


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Taking a look at the Hall of Fame candidacies of the Yankees' odd couple, Billy Martin and George Steinbrenner.

The pairing is straight out of the classic Miller Light TV commercial, the most famous Odd Couple of their era in baseball, a poor street tough from a broken home and a child of privilege and wealth, united by their volatility and their indomitable will to win but unable to coexist in each other's company long enough to share the fruits of victory more than once. Billy Martin and George Steinbrenner share space on the new Expansion Era Hall of Fame ballot to be voted upon at the upcoming Winter Meetings, and it's no stretch to suggest that both men, now deceased, could join the ranks of the Cooperstown immortals together.

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November 1, 2009 12:02 pm

You Could Look It Up: He Should Have Picked Lee

8

Steven Goldman

The managerial decision tree for picking Game Four starters has had a number of offshoots, but how often did they lead to victory?

The present World Series has been notable for the way that both managers, facing rotations that are just a bit shorter than either would like, have struggled with the question of whether to bring back their Game One starters on short rest for Game Four. The managers tested their staffs and came to opposite conclusions: Charlie Manuel, fearful of pushing Cliff Lee too hard despite his terrific start in Game One and seeing that Joe Blanton had pitched relatively well this (and disregarding a poor track record against the Yankees), chose to wait until Game Five for Lee's encore. Joe Girardi, despairing of losing a World Series game with the wild and rarely utilized Chad Gaudin, decided to pitch big CC Sabathia on short rest, a move that paid off in the last round of the playoffs.

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October 28, 2009 1:11 am

World Series Prospectus: Yankees versus Phillies Preview

25

Jay Jaffe

Will the Phillies establish a mini-dynasty, or will the Yankees add to their crowded trophy case with another title?

A year ago, the Phillies broke a 28-year-old title drought by winning the World Series, defeating the upstart Rays in five games. After winning 93 games in the regular season and tidily dispatching both the Rockies and the Dodgers in the first two rounds, they're back to defend their crown with a cast that's largely the same, save for summer acquisition Cliff Lee. They're the first NL team to repeat as pennant winners since the 1995-1996 Braves, and if they win the World Series, they'll be they first senior circuit club to do so since the 1975-1976 Reds.

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October 25, 2009 1:14 pm

On the Beat: Weekend Update

9

John Perrotto

While the ALCS went into rain delay mode, there's still news and moves from around the majors.

Jimmy Rollins was reflecting on the previous October and looking ahead to this year's postseason one day early in spring training, when he said something that made it clear the Phillies would not be complacent this season. "What we did last year, winning a World Series, was a great accomplishment and something we can cherish for the rest of our lives," the shortstop said. "You know what, though? The truly great teams are the ones who won more than one World Series. The teams people remember and talk about forever are the ones who did it more than once. That's what I'd like to see us do, and I think everyone else on this team feels the same way."

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Sabermetricians are often accused of not enjoying the game of baseball and instead just caring about the numbers. But it's entirely possible to love both. And in the best case scenario, the numbers can help us even further appreciate our enjoyment of the game.

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November 12, 2007 12:00 am

You Could Look It Up: Sweepers, Part 3

0

Steven Goldman

Wrapping up the grand historical tour of the game's four-and-out championships.

Hurrying this series on World Series sweeps to its conclusion, rather than do all of the remaining sweeps at a minimal level of detail, what we'll do is stop well short of the present day, covering the sweeps that took place between 1950 and 1990 in depth, and leaving the sweeps by the mini-dynastic Yankees (1998 and 1999 over the Padres and Braves, respectively), the Epsteinian Red Sox (2004 and 2007, over the Cardinals and Rockies), and Ozzie Guillen's random-stroke-of-good-fortune White Sox (defeated the Astros, 2005) to your memories, and perhaps a later collection of articles.

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October 23, 2006 12:00 am

World Series Prospectus: The I [Heart] New York Matchup

0

Jay Jaffe

Jay suffers the exquisite torture of a Jeff Weaver-Kenny Rogers duel in Game Two of the World Series. Go along for a sometimes rocky but always informative ride.

From the second inning through the eighth, Anthony Reyes faced just one hitter over the minimum (a seventh-inning single by Carlos Guillen), retiring 17 batters in order and finishing the frame in 10 pitches or less five times. Ten of those 22 plate appearances ran just one or two pitches, and overall, Tiger hitters saw just 3.14 pitches per plate appearance against him. That's not a recipe for a productive approach at the plate. A simple matter of rust, or a reversion to the team's hacktastic regular-season approach? Tonight should provide us with more insight into that. It also, of course, provides us with an even more compelling storyline, what this Yankee fan will call the I [Heart] NY matchup between two Bronx busts, Kenny Rogers and Jeff Weaver.

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Beginning tonight, the Cardinals find themselves aligned against a team that is nearly 100 points higher in third-order winning percentage. Jim wonders whether history gives them a chance.

Any team that follows the rules and beats all comers in the first two rounds of the playoffs deserves to be in the World Series. That the team does so in spite of having the worst third-order percentage ever for a World Series participant make it more or less of an accomplishment? The Cardinals, at .471, have gotten this far in spite of pushing down hard on the lower perimeter of Series participation (lowering the standard by 17 points from previous the low team, the 1987 Minnesota Twins); it's something of a wonder as well as a testament to the foibles of short series participation.

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September 8, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit List

0

Jay Jaffe

Jay and Clay Davenport team up for a stroll through history, Hit List-style.

The 2005 edition of the Tribe capped the Hit List's inaugural season with a dubious honor, finishing atop the final rankings but narrowly missing the playoffs after a collapse in the final week. This year, the Indians have been falling short again (must be drinking from the Cuyahoga). When Jim Baker analyzed them in a New York Sun piece a few weeks back, they were more than 12 games off of their third-order win projection, and they're still in double digits.

That feat prompted Jim to ask the same question that I and several readers had asked at the end of last season: "How often does this happen?" Given the short history of the Adjusted Standings, which Clay Davenport introduced on May 1, 2003--making an example of the Indians, no less--nobody knew. Until now.

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July 5, 2006 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: More on Elo

1

Nate Silver

Nate returns to Elo for a look at the 30 best teams since 1960.

I decided not to stray at all from the method that I introduced in last week's article. There are arguments for introducing some sort of league-difficulty adjustment for the era before interleague play, and perhaps changing the bonus for margin of victory to coordinate it with the run-scoring environment of the league. But one of the nice things about Elo is its relative simplicity, and in the interest of both time and simplicity, I decided not to tinker with it.

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