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Articles Tagged 1000 Runs 

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April 16, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Land of 1,000 Runs

14

Jay Jaffe

It's a folly to suggest that the 2012 Tigers--or any other team--will be able to score 1,000 runs.

During the first series of the season, the Tigers rolled up 26 runs while sweeping a three-game series from the Red Sox, after which Boston Globe columnist Nick Cafardo dropped an item in his Sunday notes column about the high-powered offense driven by Miguel Cabrera and newcomer Prince Fielder. "Some baseball people believe the Tigers could score close to 1,000 runs with these two hitting back to back," wrote Cafardo, never elaborating as to who those baseball people might be.

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March 25, 2008 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: Royals and Phillies

0

Rany Jazayerli

Zack Greinke shares an underrated ability with Curt Schilling, and NL MVP Jimmy Rollins set one more record than you may have realized last season.

Kansas City Royals

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August 9, 2007 12:00 am

Nippon Prospectus

0

Mike Plugh

The playoff race is beginning to heat up in both the Pacific and Central Leagues, but for now all eyes will be on the prestigious Koshien High School Baseball Championship.

The season in the NPB has been very interesting so far. Each of the leagues boast compelling battles for first place, as well as for the three playoff berths. For the most part, the Central League has been led by the Yomiuri Giants and Chunichi Dragons, with several teams fighting for the final playoff spot. Yokohama has looked strong throughout the year, but never count out the Hanshin Tigers, and even the Carp and Swallows both have reason for optimism as well. If I were to choose the third team at the start of August, I would pick the Tigers, if only because their pitching has been consistently good so far this year.

The Pacific League has been more dramatic. Nippon Ham was in last place during the early part of the year, then rocketed into first past everyone thanks to a team-wide improvement in all phases of the game. What looked like a one-man show thanks to the brilliance of Yu Darvish has been transformed into a team effort that promises to give the Sapporo club a great chance at repeating as champions. SoftBank has disappointed, especially thanks to the shoulder woes of Kazumi Saito and the deteriorating hitting of the once-mighty Nobuhiko Matsunaka. With their deep roster, they still have a chance of passing the Fighters to move into first. The Chiba Lotte Marines look to be a lock for the third playoff position on the strength of a surging offense and a deep rotation of good, not great starting pitching. The Lions, Buffaloes, and Eagles are virtually out of contention, but each team's fans have something to follow as the stretch run begins.

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There's more recordball afoot, with one potential achievement that should stay interesting all the way down the stretch.

We've seen a lot of traditional baseball milestones touched on this season. No doubt the readers of this site don't need these marks listed. Suffice it to say that players like Sammy Sosa, Alex Rodriguez, Barry Bonds, and Tom Glavine have reached some big round numbers in some big round individual categories. One club is also on the way to a rare big round number: 1000. That club is the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, and the 1000 in question is runs allowed.

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April 20, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Baserunning, in Two Acts

0

Dan Fox

Dan takes a closer look at baserunning aggressiveness, including an analysis of rundowns.

As I write this on April 19, the Mariners are tenth in the AL in runs scored per game to go along with their 6-8 record. Last season, they were 22nd in run scoring in all of baseball, and 13th in the American League, sandwiched nicely between those offensive juggernauts, the Royals and Twins. So what Hargrove is saying about needing more runs is certainly true, but is a more aggressive baserunning style an avenue to improvement?

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March 21, 2006 12:00 am

Future Shock: California, Here They Come

0

Kevin Goldstein

Kevin takes a closer look at the Class A California League, and how its extreme offensive environments make raw performances look more impressive than they truly are.

Of the 14 teams that have their Low Class A affiliate in the Midwest League, eight have their High Class A affiliate in the California League, a very different offensive environment for young hitters and pitchers. The dramatic change in the California League leads to plenty of performances which look like growth, owing the the way the League as a whole inflates offense. Taking a step back and looking at the broader picture, however, shows that one needs to evaluate more than just raw statistics to determine the difference between a true offensive breakout season and one that is a product of the California League.

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July 30, 2004 12:00 am

Park Factor Review

0

Clay Davenport

Now that we've gotten to the 100-game mark on the season, I decided to take a look at how the park factors were shaking out so far in '04. Park factors are noisy pieces of data--that's the reason why we use three-year averages in the first place--and I expect that some of these 100-game factors will change significantly between now and the end of the season. That caveat aside, let's take a look at how pro baseball's parks--from the majors down to A-ball--are playing.

That caveat aside, let's take a look at how pro baseball's parks--from the majors down to A-ball--are playing.

The New Parks

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March 19, 2003 12:00 am

PECOTA Preview

0

Nate Silver

The PECOTA system acknowledges that there is a wide range of variance intrinsic to any set of forecasts. What's more, there's no reason to expect that this variance will be unrelated to the team that a player toils for. On the contrary, there are myriad anecdotal examples of entire teams who routinely fall toward the top or the bottom of their forecast range. Under Dusty Baker, the Giants have consistently gotten more production than would reasonably be expected from a set of thirtysomethings. Under Leo Mazzone, the Braves have consistently turned waiver wire fodder into good or even great bullpen arms. Indeed, it's possible to conjure up an argument like that for just about every team, and some of the time, you won't even be BSing. Translating player projections into team forecasts is an exercise that caters mostly to the left side of the brain; you're sure to see some more creative solutions in the coming days as we publish the BP author forecasts, crazed opium dreams like the Cubs taking the pennant. I have myself deviated from the HAL 9000 version in quite a number of cases. Nevertheless, we've never had anything quite like PECOTA before, and it's worth seeing what it has to say.

Indeed, it's possible to conjure up an argument like that for just about every team, and some of the time, you won't even be BSing. Translating player projections into team forecasts is an exercise that caters mostly to the left side of the brain; you're sure to see some more creative solutions in the coming days as we publish the BP author forecasts, crazed opium dreams like the Cubs taking the pennant. I have myself deviated from the HAL 9000 version in quite a number of cases. Nevertheless, we've never had anything quite like PECOTA before, and it's worth seeing what it has to say.

A quick outline of the methodology used here:

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It wasn't that long ago, really. In 1992, 30 homers would have placed a hitter fourth in the National League. These days, a player could hit 30 home runs and never show up on the typical fan's radar. We're in the middle of the biggest home run jump in baseball history. (Big news, to you all, I'm sure. Tomorrow's feature: the Pope wears a skullcap!)

If the sportswriters of the future aren't careful, then hitters of the '90s are going to be seriously overrepresented in the Hall of Fame, the same way that hitters of the '20s and '30s are today. People looked at the gaudy batting averages of the era (Freddy Lindstrom hit .379 in 1930! Ooooooh!) and instinctively viewed then through the prism of their own era (a .379 average in 1976, when the Vets' committee inducted Lindstrom, would have been 40 points higher than any major leaguer actually hit that year).

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