CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged 10-5 Rights 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 24, 2012 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Dempster the Brave?

0

Ben Lindbergh

The Braves and Cubs conditionally agree to a deal for Ryan Dempster.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Ratings for the MLB All-Star Game were up this year, but does that really tell the whole story?

Television ratings are a funny thing. The spin that can come out of the numbers can drive reports in wildly divergent directions. In sports, ratings can be spun to say that the popularity of a given league or club is high or low, depending on those feeding the information. Of course, leagues and clubs love to tout growth, while detractors can spin numbers negatively. For Major League Baseball, ratings have been used to show that the game’s popularity is on the rise, while others have pounded keys to say that it’s a “dying sport.”

So, which one is it? As is often the case in data analysis, the truth can lie in the middle. Before we get started, let’s give a quick primer on what the ratings numbers mean.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 2, 2011 10:03 am

Contractual Matters: Prince Albert at the Five and Dime

4

Jeff Euston

Albert Pujols leads the roster of players newly anointed with "10-and-5" no-trade rights.

For Albert Pujols, the 2010 season was his 10th year in the majors, meeting the requirement for election to the Hall of Fame. With the end of the season, he also earned full no-trade protection as a "10-and-5 man": a 10-year veteran who has spent the last five seasons with the same team.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 4, 2010 6:01 am

Ahead in the Count: Service-Time Contracts and Wins, Part 1

27

Matt Swartz

A look into how teams are assembled with talent from different sources at different prices.

In my last two columns, we discussed when rebuilding teams should sign free agents. Two weeks ago, I explained that teams with outside shots at competing could be doing themselves a favor to sign free agents who would be tradable for prospects at the trade deadline. Several insightful readers pointed out that signing free agents may be a way to work towards improving in the future. I investigated this claim in last week's column, in which I looked at how well free agents who signed multi-year deals performed in subsequent years of their deals. The overwhelming likelihood was that the biggest value from a free agent comes from the first year of their deal; in many cases, they declined considerably after the first year. Thus, the logical next question in my view is how winning teams are comprised. In this article, I grouped each type of player based on their service time-implied contract status, and checked how each team did at getting wins via each type of player.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 24, 2009 1:10 pm

Prospectus Hit List: Senior Circuit Surprises

1

Jay Jaffe

The supposed weak sister of the two leagues boasts six of the game's ten best teams in the early going

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

A few notable general managers get extensions, and Allard Baird gets a corner office in Boston. The first Transaction Analysis of the offseason covers all the bases.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 6, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three

0

Joe Sheehan

The Yankees continued their run through the ... hey, not so fast! In San Diego, the Cardinals continued to make a statement about the importance of home-field advantage, while in New York the Mets were the one team to keep order in the first two games.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160157644_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

The Tigers are still at the top, the A's help their cause with a sweep of the Mariners, and some unsurprising performances by rookies help make some pennant races pretty interesting.

Read the full article...

The Rangers make a big jump as the Orioles sink like a stone in this week's Prospectus Hit List.

Read the full article...

As the owners and players jockeyed toward another mid-season labor showdown, the owner of one of MLB's least efficient teams sought to set the record straight. Bud Selig announced: "The fact is, there are staggering cash operating losses in major league baseball today. ...The enormous cost increase in player salaries is, by far, the biggest reason baseball has dire economic problems. Any charge other than that is clearly and totally unsubstantiated by the economic facts as they exist today." MLB figures released after the season put the total of those "staggering cash operating losses" at less than 1% of revenue. In fact, player salaries had doubled since 1981. So had MLB's revenue, as cable TV became an increasingly important source of income. Owners who reinvested their rights fees in payroll helped create a $300,000 gap between the major league minimum and the average salary. As the Braves and Pirates demonstrated, badly-run franchises could now waste more money than ever before.

Table 9. Marginal Payroll/Marginal Win, 1985

Team W L Pct Marg 8/31 Marg Marg $/ Wins Payroll Payroll Marg Win Baltimore 83 78 0.516 34.9 $12,371,429 $10,691,429 $306,208 Boston 81 81 0.500 32.4 $11,080,695 $9,400,695 $290,145 Cleveland 60 102 0.370 11.4 $6,623,133 $4,943,133 $433,608 Detroit 84 77 0.522 35.9 $10,850,643 $9,170,643 $255,295 Milwaukee 71 90 0.441 22.8 $12,216,965 $10,536,965 $461,318 NY Yankees 97 64 0.602 49.0 $15,398,047 $13,718,047 $279,946 Toronto 99 62 0.615 51.0 $11,800,281 $10,120,281 $198,379 California 90 72 0.556 41.4 $11,559,593 $9,879,593 $238,638 Chi WSox 85 77 0.525 36.4 $9,849,689 $8,169,689 $224,442 Kansas City 91 71 0.562 42.4 $11,754,512 $10,074,512 $237,606 Minnesota 77 85 0.475 28.4 $7,238,667 $5,558,667 $195,728 Oakland 77 85 0.475 28.4 $10,008,823 $8,328,823 $293,268 Seattle 74 88 0.457 25.4 $5,549,870 $3,869,870 $152,357 Texas 62 99 0.385 13.8 $8,101,222 $6,421,222 $465,809 Chi Cubs 77 84 0.478 28.9 $13,478,225 $11,798,225 $408,550 Montreal 84 77 0.522 35.9 $10,195,246 $8,515,246 $237,050 NY Mets 98 64 0.605 49.4 $11,013,714 $9,333,714 $188,942 Phldelphia 75 87 0.463 26.4 $11,785,445 $10,105,445 $382,782 Pittsburgh 57 104 0.354 8.8 $10,223,945 $8,543,945 $976,001 St. Louis 101 61 0.623 52.4 $10,441,639 $8,761,639 $167,207 Atlanta 66 96 0.407 17.4 $14,771,382 $13,091,382 $752,378 Cincinnati 89 72 0.553 41.0 $9,258,848 $7,578,848 $185,063 Houston 83 79 0.512 34.4 $10,153,335 $8,473,335 $246,318 LA 95 67 0.586 46.4 $11,970,412 $10,290,412 $221,776 San Diego 83 79 0.512 34.4 $9,801,052 $8,121,052 $236,077 San Fran 62 100 0.383 13.4 $7,777,945 $6,097,945 $455,071

Read the full article...

February 21, 2002 12:00 am

Japanese Baseball, Pt. 2

0

Clay Davenport

Read the full article...

Players of the Year

Read the full article...

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries