CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged (empty)  

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

08-25

comment icon

1

Pebble Hunting: A Sense Of Where You Are
by
Sam Miller

08-25

comment icon

6

What You Need to Know: Beltway Goes Balt's Way
by
Demetrius Bell

08-24

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 944: How Many Barry Bondses?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-24

comment icon

0

Rubbing Mud: Alex Reyes, Game-Changer
by
Matthew Trueblood

08-24

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: Gsellman Is Just In Time
by
Emma Baccellieri

08-24

comment icon

0

Two-Strike Approach: Verlander's Third Act
by
Cat Garcia

08-24

comment icon

0

Outta Left Field: 1 Percent Playoff Odds, 110 Percent Effort
by
Dustin Palmateer

08-23

comment icon

5

What You Need to Know: Homer Story
by
Daniel Rathman

08-23

comment icon

2

Baseball Therapy: If I Had A Million Dollars
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-22

comment icon

0

BP Kansas City
by
Craig Brown

08-22

comment icon

1

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, Aug. 22
by
Matt Sussman

08-22

comment icon

0

TINO (There Is No Offseason): Ep. 75: Municipal Bonds
by
George Bissell, Ben Carsley, Craig Goldstein and Bret Sayre

08-22

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 943: Debating the Diamondbacks and Dylan Bundy
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-22

comment icon

9

Prospectus Feature: Something Not Worth Forfeiting
by
Henry Druschel

08-22

comment icon

2

Players Prefer Presentation: We Still Have Time
by
Meg Rowley

08-22

comment icon

2

What You Need to Know: Flaherty, Floperty
by
Ashley Varela

08-21

comment icon

0

BP Toronto
by
Jenn Smith

08-21

comment icon

0

BP South Side
by
James Fegan

08-20

comment icon

0

BP Boston
by
Matt Collins

08-19

comment icon

0

What You Need to Know: DeGrim
by
Nicolas Stellini

08-19

comment icon

1

The Prospectus Hit List: Friday, August 19
by
Matthew Kory

08-19

comment icon

3

Prospectus Feature: Baseball's Predictable 2,430
by
Trevor Strunk

08-19

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 942: Should Baseball Teams Buy Insurance?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-18

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: Never Fight A Day Game In Colorado
by
Demetrius Bell

08-18

comment icon

9

Tools of Ignorance: The Trades Remain the Same
by
Jeff Quinton

08-17

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 941: Pitcher Value and the Zach Britton Debate
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-17

comment icon

0

BP Unfiltered: Baseball Fans of the World Unite
by
Rob Mains

08-17

comment icon

0

BP Bronx
by
Ben Diamond

08-17

comment icon

0

What You Need to Know: Yankees Soaked
by
Nicolas Stellini

08-17

comment icon

0

Flags Fly Forever Podcast: Ep. 101: You Know It When You See It
by
George Bissell, Mike Gianella and Bret Sayre

08-17

comment icon

3

Team Chemistry: What's Average For Pitchers?
by
John Choiniere

08-17

comment icon

2

Prospectus Feature: Pujols, Verlander, and Modern Baseball
by
Trevor Strunk

08-16

comment icon

0

BP Unfiltered: Match the MLB Legend With His Hobby In 1992
by
Sam Miller

08-16

comment icon

0

BP Wrigleyville
by
Henry Druschel

08-16

comment icon

0

What You Need to Know: Green Light, Now Begin
by
Daniel Rathman

08-16

comment icon

5

Cold Takes: Win At Baseball By Losing Every Trade
by
Patrick Dubuque

08-16

comment icon

29

Baseball Therapy: Rage Over Roids
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-16

comment icon

3

Banjo Hitter: The Seagers' Pursuit Of Best-Brothers Status
by
Aaron Gleeman

08-15

comment icon

0

BP Toronto
by
Kyle Matte

08-15

comment icon

1

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, August 15
by
Matt Sussman

08-15

comment icon

2

What You Need to Know: Every Time We Say Goodbye (I Cry a Little)
by
Ashley Varela

08-15

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 940: Live at Saber Seminar!
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-13

comment icon

1

TINO (There Is No Offseason): Ep. 74: I Love Andrew Benintendi
by
George Bissell, Craig Goldstein, J.P. Breen and Matt Collins

08-13

comment icon

0

BP Bronx
by
Andrew Gargano

08-13

comment icon

0

BP Boston
by
Matthew Kory

08-12

comment icon

0

The Prospectus Hit List: Friday, August 12
by
Matthew Kory

08-12

comment icon

1

What You Need to Know: Pain and More Pain for the Red Sox
by
Emma Baccellieri

08-12

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 939: Death to Dumb Stadium Deals
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-11

comment icon

2

Prospectus Feature: Nothin' to Do With Groundball Pitchers? DRA Weighs In
by
Rob Mains

08-11

comment icon

15

Pebble Hunting: The Saddest Age-27 Seasons of 2016
by
Sam Miller

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

Practically every major trade in baseball fits into the same mold. Why isn't there more variety?

By all accounts we just wrapped up a thrilling trade deadline. The volume, the drama, the last minute-ness, the quality of players—both major and minor leaguers—was more than those looking to be entertained could have hoped for. Those (if such a population exists) looking for variety in trades, though, were likely disappointed. Sure, we got a good, redundant major leaguer for another, somewhat redundant, major leaguer trade in the Matt (Duffy and Moore) swap, and a salary dump (Liriano to the Blue Jays), but every other trade was minor leaguers for major leaguers (usually on contracts expiring at this or next season’s end). There are tons of variations within this type of trade, but it is all the same kind of trade. This type of trade, of course, makes sense—teams that have a chance to win this year value certain players more than teams that do not have such a chance; and when two teams value a player a differently, there is always an opportunity for a trade.

But, why then, do certain players that should be valued differently (such as Jeremy Hellickson) not get traded? Also, how is it possible that over the past 10 years, no two teams have said, “I like your third baseman more than my third baseman and you like my third baseman more than your third baseman” and just swapped them? Or how has this not happened for any other position? We see this once in a while with sixth starters and inconsequential relievers, but we never see this with any primetime players. Why don’t we see this? I believe there are several contributing factors that I will discuss below. I also believe there are several (or more) contributing factors I have not thought of and, thus, will not discuss below.

Read the full article...

Ben and Sam discuss their definitions of "value" and whether they think Orioles closer Zach Britton will be a deserving candidate for end-of-season awards.

Read the full article...

68 years ago...

I’m a Retrosheet volunteer. If you don’t know it, Retrosheet—the website is retrosheet.org—is a fantastic site. It’s an online source of box scores and play-by-play data, and its archive is growing. And it’s 100 percent free to baseball researchers. It’s so prominent in research circles that when you use the Play Index at Baseball-Reference, one of the default timeframe choices is “Retrosheet (1913-2016).” It’s a source for some of the statistics here at BP and has launched a constellation of R scripts. (If you want to get involved with Retrosheet, hit the email icon at the top of this and I’ll send you information.)

Read the full article...

August 17, 2016 12:52 pm

BP Bronx

0

Ben Diamond

New York's roster suddenly looks much different, with lots of young players kickstarting a rebuild.

Paste post text here

Read the full article...

The good, the bad and the Utley from Tuesday's action.

The Tuesday Takeaway
Most games have one definitive narrative that emerges after a period of time. Sometimes it’s a brilliant pitching duel, or yeoman’s work by a bullpen that’s forced into action early. Sometimes it’s a multi-home run game from one player.


Read the full article...

George Bissell, Mike Gianella and Bret Sayre of Baseball Prospectus take a deep dive into current fantasy baseball topics.

Read the full article...

Recalibrating our impressions of pretty-okay.

Two weeks ago, I posted an article about average hitter stat lines and how they’ve changed over time. Furthering my suspicion that I have no idea what’s likely to be popular and what isn’t, it was my most-commented-upon piece yet. Notably, one of the commenters asked if I’d be doing a similar thing for pitchers. At the time, I actually hadn’t intended to—I’m inclined to think the triple slash line lends itself to being mis-remembered/mis-assumed much more than any other stats—but I also appreciate conceptual symmetry, so here we are: How have common, public-knowledge-type stats changed over the years for pitchers?

Picking stats to include here was harder than it was for hitters, and the route I chose was the inclusion of stats that the general baseball audience might have a subconscious feel for, even if they couldn’t name the average line off the top of their heads like they may have been able to for hitters.

Read the full article...

All the good hitters are young. This is not true of the other half of the league's players.

I recently moved back to where I grew up, in the Philadelphia area, or if you want to be specific, just north of that Delaware Valley we know and love. Moving back home has meant moving back to a lot of familiar people and places, and that’s been a real joy; perhaps not chief among these joys, but among them, has been a return to Philadelphia sports radio. When I lived in Chicago, I’d dabble in the ocean of sports radio there, but the pessimism and anger there just wasn’t the same as my pessimism and anger, so it never quite clicked. Now that I’m back, I can listen to the angry men yell on the AM radio for as long as I can stand, which is usually 15-20 minutes.

And while there is increasingly more decent sports radio—the immortal Chris Mueller and John Barchard have helped with this—the angry, reactionary takes far outweigh the reasoned ones. And so I started listening more carefully for germs of sense in the reactive talk. Obviously we know what isn’t true—the Phillies can’t trade for Mike Trout; no one will be selling the team; ownership will not “reward” the fans for their loyalty. But in the premises of some of the call-in segments and rants, there are legitimate questions, and on the rare occasion those questions devolve on baseball in August in a city where there’s no hope of the postseason, there are some compelling threads to pull out. For instance: Where are all the really good, kind of old veterans?

When I heard the question, I initially scoffed because, of course there are good older veterans. This was just a case of confirmation bias and a young, fun, and bad Phillies team featuring Ryan Howard’s terribly aging corpse distorting perspectives.

Well, as it happens, give a point to sports talk radio. As has likely been discussed in the pages of this site many times, the top 10 in rWAR this year, according to Baseball Reference, are all 33 or under. Take out the outliers of Robinson Cano, Josh Donaldson and Clayton Kershaw (RIP) from the list, and that number plummets to 26. (Jose Altuve, you are now an elder statesman.) Now, 33 isn’t exactly young in baseball years, but Cano isn’t in the same geriatric ballpark as A-Rod or Beltran, let alone 39-year-old Barry Bonds, who had led the league in rWAR back in 2004. So what the heck? Where art thou, 32-40-year-old stars? Is Robinson Cano all that’s left?

Scanning a list of WAR leaders, the answer is kind of “yes and no.” Miguel Cabrera remains in the top 30 thanks to his bat if not his glove, but despite seeming like he’s been around forever, he’s only 33. Same with Evan Longoria, who, while transcendent in his way, is only 30. Daniel Murphy’s 31-year-old season continues to be a revelation, and Justin Turner is still hitting. Ian Kinsler is the oldest within spitting distance, at 34 years old, and we’d be wrong to not mention the prejudices of WAR when it comes to analyzing designated hitters, as David Ortiz is having a historically good 40-year-old season. But I think we at least have to wonder—where are the late-career stars?

One answer, looking back at previous Top-10 rWAR lists, seems to be that many of our best stars from 2004-2010 burned out pretty much around the same time. The bright and quick peaks of players like Chase Utley; the steady decline of players like Ben Zobrist or Albert Pujols; the retirements of Derek Jeter, David Ortiz, and Alex Rodriguez. All of these contribute to what seems like a barren landscape of truly elite older position players. Add on to this that some of the best older position players still at it are not as flamboyant as your Manny Ramirezes gone by, and you’d be forgiven for thinking that the older star had vanished. There are 66 position players over 30 playing in the majors this year, and very few of them are what you’d, subjectively, call bona fide stars. Raise the age to 33, and you’re left with 28. Above 35? Only 14. Which is sobering not in terms of numbers—only 11 players were over 35 in 2006—but in terms of names. No Jim Thomes or Frank Thomases on the list in 2016 to be sure.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 16, 2016 9:52 pm

BP Unfiltered: Match the MLB Legend With His Hobby In 1992

0

Sam Miller

s

The 1992 set of Pinnacle had a series called SIDELINES, in which major-league players' hobbies were photographed and written up. You know these players well; can you match the player to his hobby? Your choices for each are:

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

August 16, 2016 12:00 pm

BP Wrigleyville

0

Henry Druschel

Chicago has nothing left to play for, but must be ready to play for everything.

Paste post text here

Read the full article...

The Yankees get a superb performance from a rookie starter, and more from Monday's games.

The Monday Takeaway
Yankees right-hander Chad Green entered play Monday with splits wide enough to make Simone Biles jealous.

He’d been dominant with the platoon advantage at hand, holding like-handed foes to a .236/.271/.382 slash line with 17 strikeouts in 59 at-bats, but vulnerable without it, suffering a .327/.407/.731 fate at the hands of enemy lefties. As a result, he’d thrived in relief duty, limiting the opposition to a .194/.257/.194 output, and scuffled as a starter to the tune of a .316/.373/.697 allowance that included eight homers in just 18 innings of work.


Read the full article...

A case against declaring day-after winners.

There’s a board game that’s out of print now, called The Traders of Genoa, one of those German board games with a 12-page rulebook and a million little painted wooden cubes. Players take turns navigating the streets of a marketplace, employing various tradesmen to take cubes (black: pepper, brown: copper, turquoise: silk) and then convert those raw goods into finished products (points). It’s a pretty standard European resource management game; the winner is the one who best manages his “production line,” getting the goods they need and spending them as wisely as possible.

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>