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Bob Shore
12 comments | 8 total rating | 0.67 average rating
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Baseball Prospectus http://bbp.cx/i/7337
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: -1

It was employed once. The Yankees made the playoffs as a wild card team while (if memory serves) the Angels and Mariners played off to determine the winner of the American League West.

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 2

It's not true that we've never come close to a five-way tiebreaker. With two days left to play in the 1973 regular season, the correct combination of wins and losses (starting with the Cubs sweeping two doubleheaders from the Mets, and bearing in mind a makeup game between St. Louis and the Padres) would have resulted in a five-way tie for the National League East title, among all division teams except the Phillies. By my lights, that's pretty close.

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 7

Oh, come on. How can you write this article without mentioning that the White Sox scored the go-ahead run in the tenth inning on a wild pitch thrown during an intentional walk? --Bob

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

When I saw a game at Candlestick (yes, Candlestick) back in the '90s, they showed the "collision catch" as part of the highlight reel either before or during the game. I also remember watching it as a kid on the Game of the Week (though I incorrectly remembered the collision as occurring with both men reaching over the fence to rob the hitter of a home run). I think Tony Kubek said during the replay that Bonds was searching for the ball trying to claim the catch, only to find it in Willie Mays's glove. If memory serves, the other two catches both are reported in a Scholastic Books publication I read as a kid, The Baseball Life of Willie Mays. I was fortunate because that book was my introduction to baseball of the '50s, so when I read about the '51 pennant chase and The Shot Heard Round the World, I had no idea what was coming.

Nov 29, 2010 3:23 PM on Willie Mays
 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

What about the important possibility, discussed in Sheehan's article, that the very same player (or an equivalent) can be had in free agency for a price significantly less than the player would receive in arbitration? Isn't this an important factor that's omitted from your analysis of the offer/don't offer calculus? In other words, I should NOT offer arbitration to Player A, even if he's worth $20 million in marginal revenue to me, if (a) I expect him to make $16 million in arbitration, but (b) I expect his value on the free agent market to be approximately $5 million.

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

A technical issue. My Yahoo! e-mail, which I read on Safari on a Mac, often (but not always) completely loses the formatting of the newsletter. This may well be a Yahoo! issue, but I thought I'd bring it to your attention.

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

My pregnant wife was with me at the game. When she talks about it at all, she's still as likely to remind me how cold it was, or the length of the walk from the car to our seats, as she is to reflect on the piece of history we saw.

Jun 12, 2009 7:15 PM on More Revenue
 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

I was at the ball park the day Fernando Tatis jacked two against Chan Ho Park with the bases loaded in the same inning.

Jun 12, 2009 10:32 AM on More Revenue
 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

\"To place that in perspective, the average price for a ticket at Fenway has jumped from $44.56 in 2005 to $48.40 in 2008, an increase of 17.1 percent . . . .\" There\'s something wrong with the math here. That increase is less than 10%.

Dec 04, 2008 1:41 PM on MLB Meets the Recession
 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

The voluntary waiver argument can\'t be right because it would create an exception that swallows the rule. Why couldn\'t other union members voluntarily waive, say, the right to the minimum salary negotiated by the union? For a fairly prominent example, recall a few years ago when Boston\'s attempt to acquire A-Rod was thwarted. The MLBPA concluded that the revised contract that A-Rod was willing to accept was not worth as much as his original contract, and on that basis torpedoed the deal -- under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, players can\'t agree to a less valuable contract. --Bob

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

But unless this is that odd hybrid known as a mediation-arbitration (in which first the parties attempt to mediate their dispute, but if it fails, the mediator becomes an arbitrator with the power to impose a solution), this dispute is going to arbitration, not mediation, so the Grievance Mediation rules won\'t apply.

 
Bob Shore
(7337)
Comment rating: 0

Are you certain that the Arbitrator is allowed to meet with the sides separately? That\'s common in a mediation, but in my experience almost unheard-of in an arbitration, for precisely the same reasons it\'s not done in a regular trial.