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doncoffin
68 comments | 55 total rating | 0.81 average rating
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doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I can't post it here, but you can see a 1929-2013 graph here: http://signsofchaos.blogspot.com/2014/03/annual-real-gdp-1929-2013.html

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

Old Russian proverb: "We begin to die on the day we are born." So it's all downhill from the beginning...

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

One thing no one has commented on (or, perhaps, that I have not seen commented on) is that the Directors of the Hall of Fame have been silent through all of this. They define the electorate. They define the criteria. They could say, "We're going to reconsider who is eligible to vote on Hall of Fame membership. Restricting it to 10-year members of the BBWA no longer makes sense." They could say, "We have sifted the evidence and have concluded that Players A, B, C,...will be omitted from the list of players eligible for election to the Hall of Fame." They have done neither of these things. Someone want to discuss that at as much length as we seem to want to discuss the shortcomings of the voters?

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

All of which makes it even more important for the owners to re-gain control of player salaries...

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I think I want to call this possibility the "Scott Boras Loophole."

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

One more on this installment. Given the ban on signing drafted players to major league contracts...how long does a team have to wait, after signing a draftee to a minor league contract, to re-sign hom to a major league contract? And what restrictions, if any, will there be on the terms of a major league contract to which a recent draftee/signee can be re-signed?

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 3

I'm probably going to make a number of comments as I go along, so don't shoot me. First: "The luxury tax on signing bonuses is designed, in theory, to allow for competitive balance. It also is a way for the league to police clubs from overspending, and it’s a way for clubs to have a true sense of cost certainty." No, it's designed in theory to force teams to pay newly-signed amateur free agents less (as is the ban on signing them to major-league contracts). This--holding down player compensation--was the point of the institution of the draft in the 1960s, and all the various tweaks to it continue to have this purpose. and it is possible only because federal labor law allows the Union to enter into such agreements, agreements that affect people who are not members of the Union, and thus have no current voice in Union decisions.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

Sam Rice, who got a late start to his career (his first season as a regular was at age 27; when he was 28, he was seriously injured and had only 25 plate appearances) finished his career in 1934, at age 44, with 2,987 hits...no one has ever been closer without making 3,000...

May 24, 2012 10:43 AM on 10 Mr. Almosts
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 2

Hatcher, by the way, walked in about 4.5% of his PA as a player.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 2

I also agree that blaming hitting coaches (see Walker, Greg) isn't terribly useful. One thing that we can do, however, is look at how a team's prformance has changed over time. From 1990 through 1999, Anges' players walked in 8.6% of their PA; from 2000 through 2012, 7.9% (and actually falling some over time). Based on approximately 6200 PA per year, that's 42 fewer walks per year...not a lot, but noticeable, I think. If this the "fault" of the hitting coach? Or of roster construction? Both? Neither (random chance)? Who knows? But it's observable and probebly should be part of the conversation.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Interesting how many of the "worst" opening day lineups were those of expansion teams, or very recent expansion teams. The only three "established" teams are the Braves in 1988, the Mets in 1980, and the Tigers in 1974. I wonder what you'd get if you established a cutoff of 10+ years of existence for the team.

Apr 05, 2012 10:59 AM on Worst. Lineup. Ever.
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I'd guess, without looking, that the "Frank Thomas" doppelgangers had the most even split in WARP.

Mar 28, 2012 10:40 AM on ...Is This Thing On?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 2

I'm actually impressed by how closely Forbes' valuations track sale prices. Excluding the Dodgers (a team which actually ahsn't sold yet) the correlation is 0.886, which is damned good. And the actual values track nicely as well.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

BB/PA is not increasing. Between 1970 and 2011, it has fluctuated slightly, without trend, between about 8% and 9% (9.2% in 1970, 8.1% in 2011).

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

Extraordinarily interesting. An interesting sidelight: If my calculations are accurate, BABIP (which excludes HRs, of course), which hovered around .270 between 1940 and the early 1970s, is now up to around .290 (using data from BaseballReference.com). (BABIP was above .295 for most of the 1990-2005 period before falling back slightly). And non-HR hits per PA has wandered more-or-less without trend between .200 and .210 since 1940...This last fact suggests, roughly, that the increasing Ks per PA have not (necessarily) come at the expense of hits, but at the expense of other types of outs. Roughly: K/PA up; W/PA about constant; non-HR Hits/PA roughly constant. So, non-K Outs/PA DOWN.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 3

This is not a "technicality." A compromised chain of custody, which in this case could include improper storage of the sample, renders the results unreliable and therefore renders the test invalid. Period. The results cannot be relied on. And, remember, had the process remained confidential until completion--which includes the appeals process--we wouldn't even be talking about this, because we would not know about it. I'm very surprised that the breach of confidentiality seems such a minor thing to most people.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Inquiring minds want to know...

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 3

Adam Dunn's season was one for the ages, wasn't it? But, you know, one thing that I keep not seeing referenced is that Dunn had an emergency appendicitis operation and returned in a week...I continue to think that he tried to come back too quickly...and that that may have contributed to his awful season...(after four games--I know, small sample--before the operation, he was hitting .286/.475/.571...)

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

The NFL has already moved in this direction, with play-calling mostly delegated to offensive coordinators and defensive alignement decisions to defensive coordinators. So there's a clear and obvious precedent for this sort of development.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 2

I will note that the underlying theme of Derek's argument is that Selig has been a wonderful commissioner *for the owners.* That does not translate into his having been a wolderful commissioner for the fans, or for the players (and may indeed be a reason to believe that he has been a *bad* commissioner from the point of view of the players). So, yes, Selig has benefitted the owners. But the relevant point of view has to be broader than that, doesn't it, if we are evaluating Selig's impact not on the owners, but on baseball? If the owners are made better off, but the fans and players are worse off, the balance of that can easily be negative. But if I were an owner, I'd probably be really, really happy with Buddy.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

I think it's fair to say that part of Dunn's problem is his reluctance to recurerate properly from the apendectomy, and the, um, spinelessness of the Sox management in going along with him. In his first 22 games after the surgery (with 1 game off), he was 9/71, with 1 HR and 5 RBIs. After which, he played in the next 22 games in a row. I'm fully aware that apendectomies are nowhere near as difficult as they once were, but, still, one week off after major surgery? What was he--what were Kenny Williams and Ozzie Guillen--thinking?

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

The fact that Sabean has said nothing before this does not make him wrong now--nor does it make him right. (I'm not writing here about the implied threat, but about the implied need for MLB to do something about home plate collisions.)

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

The real kicker is that the Mets deferred Bonilla's salary at 8%. In 2000, the AAA corporate bond rate was about 7%. Now, it's around 5%. The 8% instead of 7% decision costs them about $200K per year. If they'd bought a safe annuity in 2000 with a one-time payment of $5.9 Million, at an appropriate rate of return, the whole thing's a wash...the only real issue, if they'd been conservative about stashing the $5.9 Million, is how Bonilla wanted to take it...the cost to the Mets is the same, either way. Unless they buy into a Ponzi...

Apr 06, 2011 1:58 PM on The Mets' Sunk Costs
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Yeah, that's why the park factors listed surprised me. The late 1950s ones seemed more reasonable...

Feb 28, 2011 6:56 PM on Duke Snider, 1926-2011
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

"Snider loses ground...due to the favorable hitting conditions of Ebbets Field..." Baseball Reference has Ebbets as relatively neutral (multi-year park factors between 102 and 105) from 1949 to 1955), with only 1956 & 1957 (both with park factors of 109) showing much in the way of a strongly favorable environment for hitters. (Park factors for pitchers are similar, between 98 and 102 until 1956/57, when they jump to unfavorable for pitchers.) I'll admit this surprised me a good deal, but, in the 1950s, the other parks were generally not paradises for pitchers (Crosley, the Polo Grounds, Wrigley, and so on).

Feb 28, 2011 2:18 PM on Duke Snider, 1926-2011
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I don't even let Holland face Ross (Hollands OPS against righties this year was 818; Perez was 540-something). I probably don't even bring Holland in. He was death to lefties this year (362 OPS, but only in about 50 PA); Perez was damned good (560-something in over 110 PA). I understand, but don't agree with, the "use your closer to close" mentality. But last night, you had to get to the 9th, and giving up even one run in the 8th was huge.

Oct 29, 2010 7:10 AM on Game Two Report
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I'm with jsherman...where was Perez? Holland, who was death to lefties (in a *very* small sample( this year (362 OPS) was heaven for righties (818). (Actually, I would have had Perez in for Schierholtz.) But Washington has the "He's my closer, and that means the 9th inning" mindset. But you gotta get to the ninth.

Oct 29, 2010 7:05 AM on Game Two Analysis
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I see that sroney beat me to it. 2 votes for Terry Forster.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

This ain't a bad career line: .397/.413/.443 BA/OBA/SA. Of course, that's in only 86 career plate appearances... Terry Forster, of course.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

"...having healthy financials usually makes it more difficult to take a hard line during labor negotiations..." Except that if an employer claims economic hardship in a collective bargaining situation, the employer *must open its books* to the union...

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

There is no convincing economic rationale for the amateur player draft. ALL it does is depress signing bonuese and initial salaries, especially for the most talented amateur players (even though those players already receive the highest bonuses and initial salaries, they are depressed; players further down the talent scale are also being exploited, but not as badly). End the draft. Free the players. Let the free market rule.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

Even mmore impressive than Marmol's K numbers are his Three True Outcomes numbers--a combined 119 K/W/HR (85/33/1) while facing 197 batters, a TTO rate of 60.4%. (On top of which he's hit 5 batters; including them raises his TTO--or, I suppose his Four Fabulous Outcomes--rate to 62.9%.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Branch Rickey used to use it to evaluate pitchers; I suspect Alan Roth came up with it. I have no source for you, however...

Jul 08, 2010 7:24 AM on The K/BB Ratio
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Well, one thing you can say about the hypothetical economic impact of a baseball all-star game is that they don't have to build the stadium for the purpose (see the recent articles in the New York Times about the state of, and use of, the facilities built for the Olympics in Greece). So at least (some of) the coast are fairly low.

Jun 21, 2010 10:40 AM on Goin' to Kansas City
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I once wrote a piece in which I said that the HoF voters mush have thought that Combs, because he played *with* Babe Ruth must have played "like* Babe Ruth. When I wrote that I knew nothing of his injury history, so I want to retrospectively alopogize for being unneceearily snide.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I'm with Jay Taylor. Who are the players on whom teams have wasted the largest chunks of their payrolls? (I'd limit this to players whose performance was not clearly derailed by injury, by the way.) I feel like mentioning that, on the lists Matt has provided us, most of the "most profitable" players are those whose mobility is limited, the lists of the "least valuable" would be those about whom management meade the biggest mistakes in avaluating performnce.

May 07, 2010 10:36 AM on Most Net Valuable Player
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I think manager style has something to do with it as well. When tony LaRussa managed the White Sox (and in looking at the As and Cardinals since then), those games always seemed to take forever. Ozzie Guillen, on the other hand, seems to manage much more quickly the Sox are now among the fastest teams...

May 03, 2010 9:14 AM on Why Are Games So Long?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: -3

On the Hank Blalock and HR + UIBB front...Are we forgetting some guy named Bonds? Hit 73 HR and has 142 UIBB back in 2001? Or are we excluding him for some reason?

Mar 09, 2010 2:34 PM on Hammering Hank
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I wonder what would happen if you used the binomial theorem. Suppose that we know that 57.5 30 year-old players decline in their age 31 season and that 62.5% of 31 year-old players decline in their age 32 season (I am obviously making tjose numbers up). What percentage of players would be expected to improve in their age 32 seasons compared to their age 31 seasons? What percentage of players actually improve? Is the difference statistically significant? Just reading your essay would lead me to think that the difference between expected and actual is not statistically significant, especially when you restrict your sample to players signing 2 year contracts.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

FWIW, the distribution of outcomes is nearly, but not quite, normal. Managers seem to be bunched more tightly around the mean than in a normal distribution, but the distribution around the mean is extraordinarly symmetric. Also, the arithmetic mean of the manager tendencies is not 1.0 (almost certainly because different managers have different numbers of attempts)--it's 1.060606... The standard devation is 0.022. I'd upload the chart, but that doesn't seem to be an option here..

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I think it's worth pointing out that Brnadon Inge (whose 2002 and 2003 slash stats look a lot alike--.202/.266/.333 and .203/.265/.339), sub-replacement player of the 2003 Tirgers, is still on the team...his decade is .234/.305/.394. At least he provided pretty good defense at 3B.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

This was my immediate response: "there are no players on the committee..." Generally, terms and conditions of employment, including work rules, are bargainable topics ina unionized environment. If I were the executive director of the MLBPA, I'm sure I'd want the voice of the players heard, either in the advisory commission (which I guess means the owners get to do whatever they want) on when the next agreement is bargained. Interestingly, Phil Rogers' immediate response, in the Chicago Tribune, was to suggest this is the death knell of the designated hitter. http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/chi-16-rogers-bud-selig-dec16,0,4802677.column

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

A couple of additional dining recommendations. Peterson's, at 96th and I-69. It's a trip from the convention center, but the food is terrific. Shapiro's Delicatessen, 900 block of South Meridian. THE place for lunch in Indy, as far as I'm concerned. Patachou, Capitol and Washington (a couple of blocks away). Terrific breakfasts and lunches. The Slippery Noodle Inn, 372 South Meridian, a great bar/blues spot.

Dec 01, 2009 2:48 PM on Tim Salmon's Decline
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

As my brother emailed me earlier today: First World Series in the old Yankee Stadium (opened 1923): Yankees win Series. In 6 games. Lost Game 1 at home. Game 6 is won by a veteran left-hander (Pennock). First World Series in the new Yankee Stadium (opened 2009): Yankees win Series. In 6 games. Lost game 1 at home. Game 6 is won by a veteran left-hander (Pettitte). Cue eerie music.

Nov 05, 2009 9:39 AM on The Crown Rests Lightly
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I'm pretty sure the grades involve more than abll-strike calls. But just that would be interesting.

Oct 27, 2009 4:13 PM on The Umpires
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

What I keep waiting for is for someone to leak the ratings of these umpires (as submitted to and maintained by MLB).

Oct 27, 2009 3:42 PM on The Umpires
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

It's a single pool of umpires now--no AL, no NL, just MLB.

Oct 27, 2009 3:40 PM on The Umpires
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 1

No comment on Tracy's playing for one run in the bottom of the 7th? Down 5-4, following a leadoff double, he had a hitter with a .363 OBP lay down (what was supposed to be) a sacrifice bunt...the fact that Scott Eyre fell down (so the bunt turned into an infield single) does not, as far as I'm concerned, mitigate the quality of the decision.

Oct 12, 2009 1:45 PM on A Game Three Classic
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 8

But...but...Joe Morgan said (on Wednesday Night Baseball) that Lidge has to be the Phillies' closer in the post season. Because, he has, you know, closer mojo. More important that whether Howard hits. More important than starting pitching. BRAD LIDGE!!! Joe Morgan said so!!!!

Sep 24, 2009 6:44 PM on Post-season Bullpens
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 2

Checking Freddie Lewis's career stats, I find he has a .357 OBA and a .424 SA. Thinking about Dan Malkiel's recent posts on BP about when to replace a veteran (and, OK, Lewis is only 28, not clearly in the decline phase of his career), it's not absurd to think that Sabean and Bochy think that the replacements Bochy has been using (particularly Schierholtz--who is only 25 this season--, whose career minor league numbers are .355 OBA, .516 SA; not so much Andres Torres) have a good probability of outperforming Lewis. The fact that this judgement turned out to be wrong does not mean that the decision was wrong. It didn't work out, but it was not, on its face, a clearly incorrect decision. I think the most that can be said was that Bochy has persisted in not using Lewis past the point at which it should be clear that he remains, at least for now, somewhat better than Schierholtz (whose career major league OPS is .740, compared with Lewis's .781).

Sep 23, 2009 9:55 AM on The Missing Man
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

The Cubs signed that contract. Hell, they offered it voluntarily, without really having to bid against any one for Bradley's services. Unless they have a legitimate reason for suspending him (with or without pay), they are stuck with it. They could easily have said that he would not play for the rest of the season, but couching it as a suspension makes it a contractual issue...and I suspect any reasonable arbitrator is likely to find for Bradley.

Sep 21, 2009 7:22 PM on Bradleygate?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I posted this as a reply, but it's probably worth being a stand-alone comment: This is from the piece on ESPN.com: "However, the Cubs have yet to issue a formal notice of the suspension to either Bradley, his agents or the union...Bradley hasn't yet been informed whether the suspension is with or without pay. He also hasn't been told what the specific basis for the suspension was." (http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=4492909) So the Cubs have not formally communicated what the suspension is for, whether it's paid or unpaid. Doesn't that say a lot about the organization?

Sep 21, 2009 3:32 PM on Bradleygate?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 6

This is from the piece on ESPN.com: "However, the Cubs have yet to issue a formal notice of the suspension to either Bradley, his agents or the union...Bradley hasn't yet been informed whether the suspension is with or without pay. He also hasn't been told what the specific basis for the suspension was." (http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=4492909) So the Cubs have not formally communicated what the suspension is for, whether it's paid or unpaid. Doesn't that say a lot about the organization?

Sep 21, 2009 3:29 PM on Bradleygate?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: -2

And just what did Bradley say that was not treating the fans right? I read his comments as being mostly about the media and about the Cubs' organization. Only a little about the fans (who have been brutal to him, frankly).

Sep 21, 2009 3:22 PM on Bradleygate?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 3

Amen. And if the MLBPA doesn't file a grievance about this, then anyone who thinks the union has too much influence should think again.

Sep 21, 2009 3:20 PM on Bradleygate?
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Shouldn't your "within one S.D. of the mean" group be 3.83 - 5.09? 4.46+/-0.63? Or did I miss something?

Jun 03, 2009 11:45 AM on Houdini, Meet Jorge
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

It's worth noting that Maranville was a full-time player for two years after he stopped being a full-time shortstop. At ages 40 and 41 he played 149 and 142 games at 2B, handling 5.44 and 5.41 chances per game (in 513 career games at second, he handled 5.47 chances per game, so that isn't all that far off his career average. As a 39-year-old SS, he had an essentially league-average range factor (5.13 TC/G compared to 5.06 TC/G); as a 40+ second-baseman, he was also about league average (5.87 TC/G and 5.25 TC/G; league averages of 5.44 and 5.41). Which is pretty remarkable. Of course, he never could hit.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: -1

Option 1. I hope you can schedule this for Monday or Wednesday...

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

An historically-oriented question. The Dodgers, in the 1970s, did a lot of shifting players between positions--Garvey from 3B to 1B; Russell and Lopes from OF to SS and 2B, respectively; the failed attempt to move Guerrero from OF to 3B. The moves of Russell and Lopes are among the few that I know of in which players succeeded in moving from less to more demanding defensive positions (although both received much criticism for their defense). Is the set of successful move larger than that?

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 3

But...but...but they skimmed with assurances that all skimming would be anonymous. To release names now would be a violation of that agreement. Right? (I\'m being snarky, in case that was not obvious.)

Feb 25, 2009 11:33 AM on Draft Caps
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

I would strongly encourage you to consider revising this post to incorporate inflation-adjusted revenue figures. It wonn\'t make the 1930s look good, but, given that the price level fell by 25% between 1929 and 1933, it also won\'t look quite so bad--revenue dowm 18% in real terms, payrolls down 16%. Given that total real output fell by 25%, that means that baseball did less badly than the economy as a whole. In the later part of the post, it\'s not clear whether the growth (in revenue?) number you cite (6.2% excluding strike years) is real or nominal growth, although you do make clear that the chart you present is real revenue growth.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Which raises another question. Why does the ballot NOT list the eligible candidates? I can frankly understand why someone might miss Volquez\'s ineligibility. In those three years with Texas, he pitched in a total of 20 games (6, 8, 6) with 12.2, 33.1, and 34 innings (with a 3-11 record, which might have tipped people off, even if they weren\'t fully clued in on his IP). It\'s not like he was a prominent--or even a minor--part of any team\'s pitching staff, certainly not for a full year.. Why not avoid issues like this and give people a ballot that lists the eligibles?

Nov 17, 2008 10:02 PM on Walk Rate Spikes
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 5

there\'s a piece of game theory in economics that sort of relates to this issue. The problem is how to induce cooperative behavior in what would ordinarily be a competitive situation. In this instance, the issue is how to reach a coordinated solution of no throwing AT a hitter, when it might, right now, look to be in my interests to do so. The solution which comes up in game theory (see Robert Axelrod\'s book The Evolution of Cooperation) is a strategy called tit-for-tat. The essential idea is that I, as a player, begin by behaving cooperatively--my pitchers do not throw at your hitters. And, so long as you cooperate (your pitchers don\'t throw at my hitters), I continue to cooperate. But if you defect--your pitchers throw at my hitters, I punish you--I have my pitchers throw at your hitters--once, and then go back to \"cooperate\" mode. So it\'s rational to cooperate. And it\'s rational to retaliate. It\'s the initial breakdown that\'s the source of the problem.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

Tagged the runner, held the ball for at least a second, ball came out when his glove hit the ground. He had clear control of the ball after the tag.

 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 4

dmoriart\'s question about variance in MLB at the 16-game mark vs. NFL records for a season is probably not the right question to ask, because you do things differently if you\'re playing 16 games over 17 (or is it 18?) weeks than if you\'re playing 16 games in less than 3 weeks. Just think about pitching usage here. How many starting pitchers would you need? Back-up position players only for in-game injuries? The parameters are so different that whatever the answer is, it\'s nat going to give us much insight into either baseball or football.

Sep 08, 2008 10:35 AM on Dodger Mo'
 
doncoffin
(422)
Comment rating: 0

This is a very nice summary of the process, and I\'m glad to see it. If you have no objections, I will use it the next time I teach collective bargaining, as it does a better job than any textbook I\'ve seen. The downside of aribtratiion for those of us outside the room is that we generaly have no access to the arguments presented by the two sides.