CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Wezen-Ball 

Search Wezen-Ball

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

04-26

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Denver's Snowy Troubles
by
Larry Granillo

04-24

comment icon

2

Wezen-Ball: When Brewers and Beer Clash
by
Larry Granillo

04-19

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: A Few of Baseball's Best Moments
by
Larry Granillo

04-17

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: "Rise of the Robot Umpires"
by
Larry Granillo

04-15

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Jackie Robinson Talks Sacrifices in "Boys' Life"
by
Larry Granillo

04-11

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: The Froot Loop Summer
by
Larry Granillo

04-09

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Which Justin Upton Home Run was Longest?
by
Larry Granillo

04-08

comment icon

2

Wezen-Ball: The 2013 Interleague Schedule
by
Larry Granillo

04-04

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Yu Darvish Reminds Us: Technology is Great
by
Larry Granillo

04-02

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: A Freak Injury for Paul Molitor
by
Larry Granillo

03-31

comment icon

2

Wezen-Ball: House Sigils for Major League Baseball
by
Larry Granillo

03-27

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Connie Mack, the Wise-Cracking Catcher
by
Larry Granillo

03-26

comment icon

2

Wezen-Ball: Li'l Pete's Big Hit
by
Larry Granillo

03-25

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: News of the Weird
by
Larry Granillo

03-21

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: A Plane Crash in Indianapolis
by
Larry Granillo

03-14

comment icon

2

Wezen-Ball: Happy Pi (Pi) Day, 2013!
by
Larry Granillo

03-13

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Globicide, or Murdering a Baseball
by
Larry Granillo

03-05

comment icon

5

Wezen-Ball: When Cuba Stomped the Orioles
by
Larry Granillo

02-28

comment icon

13

Wezen-Ball: Batting Third: Bryce Harper (and Derek Jeter)
by
Larry Granillo

02-26

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: The Astrodome's Futuristic Scoreboard
by
Larry Granillo

02-19

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: Century City
by
Larry Granillo

02-14

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: You Can't Help But Love It
by
Larry Granillo

02-12

comment icon

6

Wezen-Ball: The Night Pete Rose Broke the Record
by
Larry Granillo

02-06

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: Hank Aaron, TV Salesman
by
Larry Granillo

02-04

comment icon

7

Wezen-Ball: Clemens' 20 K's
by
Larry Granillo

02-01

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Bolton's Bombers
by
Larry Granillo

01-30

comment icon

5

Wezen-Ball: The 1948 World Series, Game1: A Radio Diary
by
Larry Granillo

01-28

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Ball Park's Classic Guide to Franks
by
Larry Granillo

01-24

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Black and Blue
by
Larry Granillo

01-23

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: The Milwaukee Walk of Shame?
by
Larry Granillo

01-19

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Earl Weaver & Stan Musial, Together
by
Larry Granillo

01-17

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Casey at Bat in the Twilight Zone
by
Larry Granillo

01-16

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: An Ultimate Road Trip
by
Larry Granillo

01-09

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jack Morris
by
Larry Granillo

01-08

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Craig Biggio
by
Larry Granillo

01-08

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jeff Bagwell
by
Larry Granillo

01-07

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Curt Schilling
by
Larry Granillo

01-07

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Mike Piazza
by
Larry Granillo

01-02

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Breaking Down the White Sox Magazine Crossword
by
Larry Granillo

12-28

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: "White Christmas" at the Ballpark
by
Larry Granillo

12-21

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Apocalyptic Fiction (Featuring the Chicago Cubs)
by
Larry Granillo

12-20

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: The Life of Babe Ruth, Illustrated
by
Larry Granillo

12-13

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: Electronic Baseball Equipment of the Future
by
Larry Granillo

12-10

comment icon

5

Wezen-Ball: The Ron LeFlore Story
by
Larry Granillo

12-04

comment icon

4

Wezen-Ball: 37 Candidates, 37 (non-PED) Excuses
by
Larry Granillo

11-28

comment icon

5

Wezen-Ball: The SPBA's Short Life
by
Larry Granillo

11-26

comment icon

0

Wezen-Ball: Indexing the Indexers
by
Larry Granillo

11-20

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: Joe Engel Trades for a Turkey
by
Larry Granillo

11-15

comment icon

1

Wezen-Ball: A Question of Value
by
Larry Granillo

11-12

comment icon

3

Wezen-Ball: "Skyfall" and Baseball's Golden Age
by
Larry Granillo

<< Previous Column Entries No More Column Entries

Before it was a big league city, people were worried that Denver might be too snowy for Major League Baseball.

The Rockies this season have already had three games postponed due to snowy weather. They've played a split doubleheader where the game time temperature was 23 degrees—for the afternoon game! More than once already, the club has had their employees—including mascot Dinger!—out on the field for hours, trying to shovel all the snow away so that a game could be played without digging out any cross-country skies.

It's been exactly the kind of winter that Denver mayor Federico Pena was always afraid of.

Read the full article...

A 1980 controversy reminds us how touchy the relationship between baseball and beer could be, even in the home of the Brewers.

The Milwaukee Brewers media guide gives only the briefest of mentions for how the club got its name:

1970: The team is renamed the 'Milwaukee Brewers' as a tribute to the city's long association with the brewing industry.

Read the full article...

A look at some of baseball's best moments found at MLB.com.

In an attempt to bring some positivity to your computer screens this week, I present to you a run-down of some of baseball's best moments, as found at MLB.com.

Ted Williams is honored at the 1999 All-Star Game

Read the full article...

A new project promises to be one of the more entertaining baseball books in recent years.

We've all thought it. Heck, many of us have even said it. Watching the exploits of Eric Gregg, Phil Cuzzi, Jim Joyce, and so many others, it's hard not to believe it at least once. "We want robot umpires!"

Read the full article...

An article in the June 1948 issue of "Boys' Life" shows us how quickly Jackie Robinson was recognized as a role model.

Read the full article...

An unconventional source of power was credited with Mickey Tettleton's surprising 1989 campaign.

There weren't many expectations for the 1989 Orioles. The year before, the club had set the bar for futility by losing the first 21 games of the season. They would end the year with a 54-107 record. In the offseason, management traded the golden gloved, silver slugging first baseman and perennial MVP candidate Eddie Murray to the Dodgers for Juan Bell, Brian Holton, and Ken Howell. It was hardly a steal for Baltimore and, what's more, the club suddenly had a 30 home run-sized hole in their already weak lineup. No one expected the O's to do anything but remain in the cellar for another year.

Then Mickey Tettleton came to the plate. Tettleton, a catcher, came up with the A's in 1984 at the age of 23. For four years, he acted as a serviceable backup, appearing in roughly half of Oakland's games. In 1986, he played in a then-career high 90 games, knocking out 10 home runs in 211 at-bats (to go along with his .204 batting average). Following Terry Steinbach's breakthrough 1987, Tettleton was cut from the team in spring training. He quickly signed on with Baltimore, where he took on a very similar role for the (dubious) record-setting club. He ended that memorable 1988 season with 11 home runs and a .261 average in 286 at-bats.

Read the full article...

Which of these three home runs by Justin Upton was hit the farthest?

Pop quiz: Which of these three home runs hit by Justin Upton over the last three years had the longest true distance?

A) July 27, 2011, at Petco Park vs. Cory Luebke

Read the full article...

Breaking down the 2013 interleague schedule for all 30 teams. What teams are forced to deviate from their regular roster/lineup construction for the longest stretch of the year?

With the Astros finally moved into the American League, we have a very different interleague schedule this year. Not only does it mean that there is now at least one interleague series happening each day of the season, from April to October, it also means that the "rivalry weekends" that were the highlights of the interleague schedule fifteen years ago have been re-shaped. Additionally, the newly balanced divisions mean that, outside of the rivalry games, all teams in a given division can play the exact same teams as their divisional opponents. No longer do the schedule makers have to worry about a six-team division matching up with a four-team division.

So how did the schedule makers do? Did the schedule turn out as balanced as can be? Were they able to ensure that teams from any one division would have the same opponents as their division-mates? Were all clubs given the same number of interleague matches or did some lucky squad or two end up a series short? One thing to remember here is that, with interleague games happening all year long instead of on two or three specific weekends, clubs are now on unequal footing when it comes to setting their rosters for the change in league rules. If one team, for example, only ever has to worry about forcing their pitchers to hit one weekend a month, they are probably in a better situation than the club forced to suddenly remove their all-star DH for nine straight games. National League clubs playing in American League ballparks will have similar problems in trying to add a DH for extended periods of time.

Read the full article...

The technology to consume and enjoy baseball games today makes this one of the best times ever to be a baseball fan.

The recent spate of no-hitters and perfect games has really helped to show us how far the technology for enjoying baseball has come in the last two decades. Comparing how we learn about and consume these historic games today with even ten years ago is a lesson in how rapidly technology can evolve in the Internet Age. For fans of baseball, this is a great thing.

In 1990-91, there were fourteen no-hitters thrown around the major leagues, including two from Nolan Ryan and a perfect game from Dennis Martinez. At that time, in our cable-less house, I would have been lucky to hear about the no-hitter by the next day, when my older brothers or I happened to see it in the newspaper. If it was a name I recognized, like Ryan, and it happened to fall on the right day of the week, I may even have been lucky enough to hear about it that night. If the event happened to fall through those cracks, however—a pretty easy feat to accomplish—I might not have heard about it at all until I ran across a Topps or Upper Deck card commemorating the feat the next summer. How else would a kid from central California have been expected to hear about the Kent Mercker-Mark Wohlers-Alejandro Pena combined no-hitter?

Read the full article...

Injuries can happen anywhere at any time. For Paul Molitor's finger, it was while running laps.

Spring training is the time of year when everyone's future is wide open and anything can happen. It's the time of year when players get into shape and play around with new skills. It's the time of year when fans come out to sit 20 feet from their favorite players and beg for autographs. It's the time of year when Joe Schlabotnik IV, wearing number 86, might face off against Señor Spielbergo (number 93) in a game-changing situation.

And it's the time of year for injuries. They happen everywhere: in the World Baseball Classic, in spring training games, in the hotel room, in dreams, at the car wash, and just about anywhere else you can imagine.

Read the full article...

Game of Thrones and MLB's Opening Day have more than a few things in common.

Two of the most anticipated events of the spring finally arrive this evening. Down where the stars at night are big and bright, the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros ring in the 2013 Major League Baseball season with the first game of the year. Meanwhile, over in Westeros, where the summers are long and the winters longer, the rangers of the Night's Watch, the Imp in King's Landing, and the Mother of Dragons welcome us to the third season of HBO's Game of Thrones with the season's first episode, "Valar Dohaeris."

In honor of this fantastic night of channel-hopping, I present to you ten house sigils of current major leaguers (plus two bonus sigils). You can create the sigil of your own favorite player at Join The Realm.

Read the full article...

A century old story shines some light on Connie Mack's greatest secret.

Ad Gumbert was a well-traveled right-handed pitcher who played his last game in 1896. In his nine year career, Gumbert pitched for National League squads in Chicago, Pittsburgh, Brooklyn, and Philadelphia. In 1890, he finished 23-12 for the Boston Reds of the Players League under manager King Kelly. In all this time shuttling around the league, Gumbert met many of the game's characters and walked away with a few stories.

In a 1911 issue of Baseball Magazine, Gumbert shared this tale on the greatest play he ever witnessed.

Read the full article...

<< Previous Column Entries No More Column Entries