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07-01

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: The Futures Game Viewing Guide, 2009 Edition
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-18

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Scouting Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer
by
Jason Parks

06-02

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: What It Means to Have the Best Farm System in Baseball
by
Sam Miller

05-20

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Rafael Furcal's Retirement Retrospective
by
BP Staff

05-13

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Sign Barry Bonds
by
Joe Sheehan

05-07

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Concussion Discussion
by
Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin

04-28

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Angels in America
by
Neil deMause

04-27

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Retaliation, and Pitchers Hitting Pitchers
by
Sam Miller

04-21

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Polling the Industry: Pick a Shortstop Superprospect
by
Jason Parks

04-08

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Derek's Guide to Becoming a Fan Favorite
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-09

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Throwdown: Clayton Kershaw vs. Madison Bumgarner
by
Doug Thorburn

03-09

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: The 2007 Interview
by
David Laurila

03-06

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Who Will Be MLB’s First $300 Million Player?
by
Maury Brown

03-04

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Can Spring Training Slugging Really Predict Breakouts?
by
Jon Shepherd and Ben Lindbergh

02-18

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Remembering Jason Giambi's Career
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-29

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: The Science of Forecasting
by
Nate Silver

11-19

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Internet Commenters Try to Trade for Giancarlo Stanton
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-05

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Farewell, Alfonso Soriano
by
BP Staff

10-21

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Fourteen Years of Brian Roberts
by
BP Prospect Staff

10-08

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: So Long, Josh Beckett
by
BP Staff

09-29

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: So long Abreu; Farewell, Willingham
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-24

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Dayton Moore's First Week
by
Rany Jazayerli

09-18

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: The Many Moments of Paul Konerko
by
BP Staff

09-09

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: A Fan's Quandary/A New Low
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-26

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: King Felix Arrives
by
Jonah Keri

08-07

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Moral Hazards of the Hit Batsman
by
Dan Fox

07-16

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Being There
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-03

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: Another Opening Day
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-11

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Rick Ankiel and Guillermo Mota: Two Careers in Player Comments
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-07

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Inside Tommy John Surgery
by
Will Carroll and Thomas Gorman

02-27

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Carl Pavano: A Career in Player Comments
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-20

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Agents, the Draft, and the NCAA
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-17

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Ryan Dempster and Jake Westbrook: Two Careers in Player Comments
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-13

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Derek Jeter's Career in Player Comments
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-11

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Arbitration Negotiations
by
Tommy Bennett

01-31

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: Which Players and Teams Look Best Over the Next Half-Decade?
by
Nate Silver

01-24

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Who Yu Gonna Call?
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-10

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Old You're In, You're Out
by
Joe Sheehan

01-03

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: The Nose Knows
by
Steven Goldman

12-26

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: The Money of Matsuzaka
by
Joe Sheehan

12-20

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Managing Expectations
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-10

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Winter Meetings Review
by
Joe Sheehan

11-26

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Guessing Game
by
Joe Sheehan

11-20

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: How to Make Up a Good Trade Rumor
by
Matt Swartz

11-07

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Today's Oxymoron is Free Agents
by
James Click

11-01

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: What Makes a Good World Series?
by
Tommy Bennett

10-22

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Game Last
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: New Ways to Spell Relief
by
Joe Sheehan

09-26

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: Tuesday Morning Ten Pack, 9/05/06
by
Kevin Goldstein

09-17

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Tiger Plan
by
Nate Silver

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How many of these guys do you remember?

There's no shortage of excitement about next Sunday's Futures Game in Cincinnati. In the meantime, here's a journey back to the game in 2009. See how many of these names you're very familiar with now. This article originally ran on July 12, 2009.

Having once been involved in the selection process for the Futures Game, I can tell you first-hand that it's not a simple process. Just like the All-Star Game, there are limitations imposed to ensure that each team is represented, and the US vs. World set-up creates additional challenges certain positions. Still, when the game kicks off (ESPN2 on Sunday at 2 pm ET), there will be plenty of top prospects in action, and for so many fans, it also represents the first time to get an actual look at players you've been reading about, at times for years, so here are some things to look out for.

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Two of this year's breakout arms were college teammates at UCLA. Here's what their amateur scouting report said.

It's been over four years since Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer pitched out of the same rotation at UCLA. During their junior season, Jason Parks wrote up this report on both of them. This piece originally ran on Mar. 14, 2011.

After catching a few tracking sessions on the back fields of Surprise, I made the trek to Los Angeles to scout UCLA’s Friday and Saturday starters: Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer. Scouting elite talent is always fun, and despite being easier than scouting talent that elicits a wide-range of opinion, it never gets old watching professional scouts, cross-checkers, scouting directors, and writers all look giddy after witnessing something special.

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The worst team in baseball used to have the best farm system in baseball. Here's how it played out.

The Brewers have the worst record in baseball and appear to be at the bitter end of their contention cycle. Eleven years ago, it started with the best farm system in baseball. This piece originally ran on Feb. 8, 2013.

In three weeks or so, Jason Parks is going to publish his organizational rankings. Rankings like these, prospect writers will remind you, are a snapshot. They capture reality at a particular moment, the publication upon which that reality immediately shifts into something slightly different or significantly different. There’s no permanent truth for prospects.

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Sixteen years of BP Annual comments.

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The reasons not to bring in the all-time home run leader [were] little more than tissue-thin fictions.

If Barry Bonds does pursue a collusion case against MLB teams, as was reported Tuesday, he might want to include the following Joe Sheehan column in evidence. This piece originally ran on Feb. 24, 2008.

A few days ago, in a piece on the free agents still looking for homes, I mentioned Barry Bonds' name in passing. About that time, it became a story in the mainstream that Bonds is in shape and looking for work. The glee with which some members of the media pounced on this story was embarrassing, even shameful. Stories with a similar theme, that the Giants are a happier bunch with Bonds no longer in the room, also abounded.

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Exploring the effects of concussions and the implications of the seven-day disabled list.

On Wednesday, after making an exceptional play on Tuesday, George Springer joined Alcides Escobar on the 7-Day concussion DL. Four years ago, Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin wrote about the implications of the 7-Day DL. This article originally ran on April 19, 2011.

Hitting a baseball isn't the most difficult activity in sports—changing a long-standing culture is. For many years, a player was not officially diagnosed with a concussion unless there was a loss of consciousness. That started to change a few decades ago, but the physiological causes and long-term effects of concussions still were not fully understood. Thus, practices among players and non-medical personnel remained static.

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Ten years before Arte Moreno's latest P.R. disaster came Arte Moreno's first P.R. disaster. Or was it?

In 2005, when Arte Moreno was still the fresh-faced owner best known for cutting beer prices, Neil deMause wrote about the clunky move to rename the team. The following ran originally on January 5, 2005.

And so it's official. To the legendarily doofy sports names of yore--the ABA's Spirits of St. Louis, the NFL's wartime Phil-Pitt Steagles--we can now add a new contender: the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

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Would Yordano Ventura act this way if he pitched in the NL?

As many a pundit has pointed out this week, Yordano Ventura might not have so much fightin' spirit if he pitched in the NL and knew he had to bat. But does retaliation against pitchers really exist? Two years ago we looked at that question. This piece originally ran on March 15, 2013.

An accepted piece of baseball wisdom that I understood growing up is that a pitcher is less likely to go headhunting if he has to step into the box himself. As J.C. Bradbury and Douglas J. Drinen wrote in the 2007 article “Crime and punishment in Major League Baseball: the case of the designated hitter and hit batters,”

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Carlos Correa, Francisco Lindor, Addison Russell or Javier Baez? We polled front office types and our prospect staff.

A year ago, when Addison Russell was still in High-A in the Oakland A's system, Jason Parks polled front office sources and the BP prospect staff about a simple question: Which elite shortstop prospect would they build their team around? With the call-up of Russell today, it's worth revisiting the responses.

The rise of the superstar shortstop prospect prompts preferential inquiries, as my email inbox, Twitter feed, and chat queues are continually maxed out with questions about Bogaerts, Baez, Correa, Lindor, and Russell, and if forced to choose, which one would I choose? The five chiseled heads on the modern Mount Rushmore of shortstop prospects (six if you go high on Mondesi) present a daily challenge of preference, a subjective exercise of forced selection tied to the realities of the present and the fantasies of the future, a tug-of-war we play with ropes made of tangible data, scouting memories of on-the-field motions, and the conceptual ideas of value and who will be most likely to achieve it.

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Why does Willie Bloomquist get to have all the fun? Derek Zumsteg writes in with a handy-dandy guide to becoming an MLB ballplayer, and a fan favorite to boot.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you periodic blasts from BP's past. Derek's advice to aspiring fan-favorites ran as a "Breaking Balls" column in August 2004.

I'm going to risk stamping a giant red expiration date on this column in this introductory paragraph: Paris Hilton has a book deal, and her proposal includes "an abbreviated version of her instructions to anyone on how to become an heiress and live a privileged life." The first is "1. Be born into the right family. Choose your chromosomes wisely."

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Two of the best young lefties in the game faced off. Doug broke it down.

In summer 2012, when Clayton Kershaw had just one Cy Young award and Madison Bumgarner had just one World Series ring, Doug Thorburn anticipated what has become a tremendous rivalry--if not to them, certainly to us. Two exceptional lefties in one of sports' best team-against-team rivalries, each under contract to his team through the end of this decade, each accomplished in a way no other current pitcher can claim. Thorburn's breakdown helps appreciate the similarities, the differences, and what sets each pitcher apart from his peers. This originally ran on Aug. 24, 2012.

Clayton Kershaw dominated the rival Giants last season, going 5-0 with a 1.07 ERA and a 49:8 strikeout-to-walk ratio in six starts and 42 innings, including a perfect four-for-four in head-to-head battles with San Francisco ace Tim Lincecum. Kershaw has held the Giants to a sub-2.00 ERA again in 2012, though he had come up on the short end of the decision in two of his three starts against them to Monday's match-up with Madison Bumgarner. It was the first meeting for two young southpaws who will likely be dueling out west for years to come.

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Sitting down with Kershaw the prospect.

In early 2007, David Laurila interviewed Clayton Kershaw. At the time, Kershaw had thrown just 56 pro innings, most of them for the Dodgers' complex team. Nobody knew at the time that in just 13 months Kershaw would be staring down Albert Pujols in the first inning of a very strong major-league debut. This interview originally ran on May 6, 2007.

***

A 19-year-old left-hander, Clayton Kershaw is the top-rated prospect in the Dodgers organization. The first high school player taken in last year's draft and the seventh pick overall, Kershaw relies on a mid-nineties fastball with excellent command, an above-average curveball and a circle change. A native of Dallas, he has an advanced pitching approach for someone beginning just his first full professional season. Kershaw debuted in the Gulf Coast League last year, posting an ERA of 1.95 while holding opposing batters to a .201 average. He is starting this season with the Low-A Great Lakes Loons, managed by former Tigers great Lance Parrish. At the time David Laurila sat down with Kershaw, he was off to a good start, going 1-0 with a 1.42 ERA while striking out 28 in 19 innings through April 29.

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