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06-20

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
Tim Britton

06-06

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Jason McLeod, Cubs VP of Player Development and Amateur Scouting
by
Tim Britton

05-23

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5

Prospectus Q&A: Rich Hill, Ace Pitcher
by
Tim Britton

04-29

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Gabe Kapler, Dodgers Player Development Director
by
Wilson Karaman

04-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Astros Pitching Coach Brent Strom
by
Evan Drellich

02-21

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4

Prospectus Q&A: John Hart on Atlanta's Extension Spree and the Future of Club-Friendly Contracts
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-02

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Donald Pries
by
Lee Lowenfish

06-01

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Russell Martin and Ryan Hanigan
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-20

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0

Prospectus Q&A: The College of Coaches on Catcher Framing
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-29

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9

Prospectus Q&A: Pitcher Workloads and Innings Limits: Two Industry Perspectives
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-13

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28

Prospectus Q&A: Kevin Youkilis
by
David Laurila

05-09

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Ben Revere
by
David Laurila

05-06

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Trumbo
by
David Laurila

05-04

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Matt Capps
by
David Laurila

04-29

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11

Prospectus Q&A: Alex Anthopoulos
by
David Laurila

04-25

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17

Prospectus Q&A: Suzyn Waldman
by
David Laurila

04-22

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Mike Teevan
by
David Laurila

04-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Larry Rothschild
by
David Laurila

04-18

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8

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part V
by
David Laurila

04-15

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5

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part IV
by
David Laurila

04-14

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4

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part III
by
David Laurila

04-13

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17

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part II
by
David Laurila

04-12

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10

Prospectus Q&A: YOU Make the Call! Part I
by
David Laurila

04-01

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Bobby Jenks
by
David Laurila

03-29

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller
by
David Laurila

03-25

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Don Kelly
by
David Laurila

03-22

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Quotes from Cardinals Camp
by
David Laurila

03-18

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Brian Duensing
by
David Laurila

03-07

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2

Prospectus Q&A: The MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference
by
David Laurila

03-01

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Adam Greenberg
by
David Laurila

02-25

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11

Prospectus Q&A: Coco Crisp
by
David Laurila

02-03

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Prospect Edition
by
David Laurila

02-01

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5

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Monbouquette, Part Two
by
David Laurila

01-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Monbouquette, Part One
by
David Laurila

01-27

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1

Prospectus Q&A: John Axford
by
David Laurila

01-25

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Drew Pomeranz
by
David Laurila

01-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-18

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Paul Hoynes
by
David Laurila

01-14

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.T. Snow
by
David Laurila

01-12

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-11

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-07

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Billy Martin Jr.
by
David Laurila

01-04

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Bob Kipper
by
David Laurila

12-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Best of Q&A 2010
by
David Laurila

12-24

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Will Rhymes
by
David Laurila

12-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Six on Scouting
by
David Laurila

12-17

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Edwin Rodriguez
by
David Laurila

12-14

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Fredi Gonzalez
by
David Laurila

12-10

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Prospectus Q&A: Mike Quade
by
David Laurila

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March 29, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller

3

David Laurila

The former top prospect discusses his rocky road in the majors, how he has overhauled his pitching mechanics, and his mental approach to the game.

Andrew Miller is an enigma getting another chance. Just how many more he’ll get, or needs, remains to be seen, but it is notable that the flame-throwing southpaw is only 25. Given all he has been through, you’d be excused for thinking he is older.

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March 25, 2011 4:49 pm

Prospectus Q&A: Don Kelly

1

David Laurila

Though the versatile fielder isn't a star, he brings more than just defensive flexibility to the table.

Don Kelly may well be the most valuable spare part in the American League. Reminiscent of Tony Phillips, the Tigers super-utilityman provides excellent versatility to Detroit’s roster, having seen time at seven different positions in his brief big-league career. He is expected to add an eighth this summer, and it is that versatility that makes him an asset. Since breaking in with the Pirates in 2007, Kelly has appeared in 84 games in left field, 30 at first base, 19 at third base, 12 in center field, five in both right field and shortstop, and four at second base.

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March 22, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Quotes from Cardinals Camp

2

David Laurila

David Freese, Colby Rasmus, and Mark McGwire discuss their approaches to hitting.

David Freese and Colby Rasmus will play key roles for the Cardinals this year, as will their hitting coach, Mark McGwire. Both players will be counted on to provide offensive punch, while Big Mac will be entrusted to help the young sluggers surpass their 2010 production. Rasmus is coming off a season where he hit .276/.361/.498 with 23 home runs. Freese hit .296/.361/.404 with four home runs before having his rookie campaign derailed by an ankle injury after just 80 games.

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March 18, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Brian Duensing

2

David Laurila

With a spot secure in the Twins' rotation, Duensing discusses his pitch repertoire, BABIP, and sequencing.

Brian Duensing is out to prove that his 2010 season was a sign of things to come and not a luck-influenced anomaly. The 28-year-old southpaw began last year in the Twins’ bullpen, only to move into the starting rotation after the All-Star break and impress to the tune of an 8-2 record in 13 starts. He was no less effective as a reliever, as his overall totals included a 10-3 record and a 2.62 ERA in 53 appearances. It was a heady first full big-league campaign, but two numbers offer a cautionary tale going forward: a .272 BABIP and a 5.37 K/9 rate.

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John Abbamondi, Joe Bohringer, and BP alum Jonah Keri discuss sharing ideas, using scouting versus statistics, and how the Rays work.

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Questions for today's Mets tryout revolve around trying to come back from getting hit by a life-threatening pitch.

Adam Greenberg doesn’t see himself as a victim, but you couldn’t blame him if he did. On July 9, 2005, Greenberg walked up to the plate in what is thus far his only big-league at-bat, and what happened next is nothing short of tragic. He saw just one pitch from Marlins left-hander Valerio de los Santos, and the next thing he knew he was sprawled in the batters’ box fearing for his life.

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February 25, 2011 8:16 am

Prospectus Q&A: Coco Crisp

11

David Laurila

The former Red Sox outfielder explains his side of the brawl he was in against Tampa Bay in 2008.

Benches-clearing brawls are fairly uncommon in baseball, but they do happen from time to time, and a doozy took place in Fenway Park on June 4, 2008. Coco Crisp was the focal point, as he charged the mound after getting drilled by a pitch from Tampa Bay right-hander James Shields. Crisp, who has a background in the sweet science, told his side of the story prior to reporting for spring training with his current team, the Oakland A’s.

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February 3, 2011 9:22 am

Prospectus Q&A: Prospect Edition

1

David Laurila

When can Stolmy weather be expected to hit Boston?

Stolmy Pimentel is as hard to predict as the New England weather. A right-handed pitching prospect in the Red Sox organization, Pimentel has shown an ability to dominate—twice last year he carried no-hitters through six innings—while at other times he has been frustratingly hittable. His Jekyll-and-Hyde performances are reflected in the rankings, as despite his high ceiling, Kevin Goldstein rates him as just the 10th-best prospect in the Boston system. Baseball America and Keith Law are somewhat more bullish, each placing him at number six.

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More baseball remembrances from the erstwhile Boston Red Sox ace.

Bill Monbouquette is as old-school as they get. The 74-year-old “Monbo” spent 50 years in the game — 11 as a big-league right-hander and many more as a pitching coach — and few have been more hard-nosed. Three years after being diagnosed with leukemia, he remains every bit as feisty.

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The former Red Sox ace and longtime pitching coach reflects on a lifetime in the game.

Bill Monbouquette is as old-school as they get. The 74-year-old “Monbo” spent 50 years in the game -- 11 as a big-league right-hander and many more as a pitching coach -- and few have been more hard-nosed. Three years after being diagnosed with leukemia, he remains every bit as feisty.

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The Brewers' closer discusses his path to the majors, film, and social networking.

When most baseball fans think of John Axford, they think of a hard-throwing right-hander who came out of nowhere to replace Trevor Hoffman as the Brewers’ closer last season. Many also look at him as the guy with the cool mustache, but there is far more to Axford than the 24 saves and the facial hair that is approaching cult status. A 27-year-old native and resident of Ontario, Canada, Axford teetered on the brink of baseball oblivion before making his mark in Milwaukee. He underwent Tommy John surgery while earning a film degree at Notre Dame, and subsequently found himself going from indie ball in western Canada to a minor-league stint with the Yankees, who released him after just one season. Signed off the scrapheap by the Brewers in 2008, he is now a bona fide big-leaguer and burgeoning online sensation.


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The Indians' 2011 first-rounder talks about mechanics, signing late, and his quirky curveball.

Drew Pomeranz has a unique curveball to go with his high ceiling. The tall left-hander was drafted fifth overall by the Indians last June—he was the first college pitcher selected—and a big reason is a breaking ball that is both nasty and, in his own words, “hard to explain.” A 6-foot-5 product of the University of Mississippi, Pomeranz inked a contract at the August signing deadline and will begin his professional career this spring.

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