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07-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: Growing Zobrists
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-19

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4

Baseball Therapy: The Pink Elephant Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-06

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7

Baseball Therapy: ...Although I Have No Idea How We'd Measure That
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-28

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2

Baseball Therapy: Dollhouses and Sandboxes
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-31

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3

Baseball Therapy: The Knee
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-24

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4

Baseball Therapy: Framing the At-Bat
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-11

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8

Baseball Therapy: The Even Slightly More Convincing Argument Against the Shift
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-03

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10

Baseball Therapy: The Pretty Good Case That the Shift Doesn't Work
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-27

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7

Baseball Therapy: Can Teams Come Back From a Comeback?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-19

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17

Baseball Therapy: The One About Exit Velocity
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-12

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5

Baseball Therapy: Somebody Is Finally Trying to Kill the Traditional Closer Role
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-07

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1

Baseball Therapy: Go Ahead, Call It a Comeback
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-05

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8

Baseball Therapy: Someone's Not Paying Attention
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-29

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7

Baseball Therapy: It Worked Last Time
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-22

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4

Baseball Therapy: Are You Cultured?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-15

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8

Baseball Therapy: Bringing Down The House
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-08

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1

Baseball Therapy: Should Someone Save Salvy?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-01

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19

Baseball Therapy: Let's Talk About Tax Policy
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-23

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13

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Times Through The Order Penalty?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-16

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7

Baseball Therapy: Do Bad PECOTA Projections Make Teams Mad?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-09

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13

Baseball Therapy: The Crack in the Defensive Spectrum
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-02

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20

Baseball Therapy: The Dark Side of Pitch Framing?
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: It's Nice to Have Options
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-19

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2

Baseball Therapy: Let's Figure Out What a Scouting Department's Entire Product is Worth
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-12

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7

Baseball Therapy: Put Russell In the Hall of Fame
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-05

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12

Baseball Therapy: Now With 50 Percent Less Math
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-22

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8

Baseball Therapy: We Can Be Heroes?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-16

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17

Baseball Therapy: Have We Been Underpricing Relievers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-08

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6

Baseball Therapy: Fiddlesticks, Yeah!
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-01

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5

Baseball Therapy: The Neuropsychology of Bad Managing
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-24

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7

Baseball Therapy: The Kimbrel Gambit
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-19

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6

Baseball Therapy: What Should the QO Number Be?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-10

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3

Baseball Therapy: I Want to Write About Player Development
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-03

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8

Baseball Therapy: How Much the DH Rule Matters
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-28

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8

Baseball Therapy: And on the Fifth Day He Rested
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-20

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5

Baseball Therapy: Say You'll Remember Me
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-13

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14

Baseball Therapy: Do We Still Need Divisions?
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-06

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9

Baseball Therapy: My Bad Baseball Predictions
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-29

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6

Baseball Therapy: Let Him Pitch!
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-22

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10

Baseball Therapy: Why Do Pitchers Get Tired?
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-15

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4

Baseball Therapy: Seven Months Has Gone So Fast
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-09

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11

Baseball Therapy: The Chessmaster and the Screwball
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-03

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5

Baseball Therapy: A Veteran and His Presents
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-25

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5

Baseball Therapy: Interaction Effects and Credit
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-18

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5

Baseball Therapy: Collage or Jigsaw?
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-11

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23

Baseball Therapy: Starlin Castro and ADHD
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-04

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21

Baseball Therapy: No Relief For Starters
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-28

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2

Baseball Therapy: Bumping the Grind
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-21

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11

Baseball Therapy: So You've Decided To Trade Within Your Division
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-08

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24

Baseball Therapy: Why Not Make the Hole Square?
by
Russell A. Carleton

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If you want a bunch of Zobrists, it helps to plant them early. Are teams doing it?

We live in an era of short benches. Recently, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred made news when he admitted that the league office has had discussions about new restrictions for teams around how they can use relievers (and how many). There’s nothing imminent, but Manfred cited the dominance of relievers in recent years and hinted that the move would bring a little offensive spark back into the game. Plus, we all know the complaints about innings where a team uses four pitchers. Because they have eight relievers on the roster.

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Do different looks give hitters fits? You won't BELIEVE the answer. (You probably will.)

Now pitching for the Milwaukee Brewers. Number 21. Jeremy Jeffress.

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On finding answers in unanswerable questions.

Let’s think outside the box. You know. “The box.” The box that every single motivational speaker and business consultant and hack writer tells you that you need to think outside of, before reaching for one of the acceptable 10 examples of out-of-the-box thinking. (Did you know that Post-It notes were created by accident? All because someone had the idea to think outside of the box!) “The box” is now—ironically enough—a tired metaphor for thinking in ways that aren’t creative. I’m always amused by the fact that people call for “outside the box” thinking, and then never talk about how that’s to be accomplished. The problem is that we are all trapped inside a mime’s box. How do you step outside a box that neither you nor anyone else can actually see?

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What can Starting Lineup figurines and Abraham Lincoln teach us about baseball research?

Somewhere at my parents’ house, there’s a Starting Lineup figurine of Jose Canseco, depicting him during his Bash Brothers days with the Oakland A’s. I got it for Christmas one year back in the days when Jose Canseco was my favorite player. I would have been nine or ten at the time and he was ... let’s just say the words “Jose Canseco” evoked a different image back in the late 80s/early 90s than they do now. Canseco had won the 1986 Rookie of the Year award at 21 and the 1988 MVP at 23, hitting 40 home runs and stealing 40 bases in the same year. At the time, Canseco seemed like the guy we would all look back on some day and tell our kids that we saw him play.

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Moving the strike zone up seems a simple, elegant solution to what ails offense. But won't anybody think of the unintended consequences!?

Last week, Major League Baseball announced a proposed change to the strike zone. In response to a zone that continued to sag downward, MLB’s competition committee has recommended that the definition of the bottom boundary of the strike zone be changed from the hollow under the kneecap to the top of the knee. It doesn’t seem like much. That’s maybe two inches of space, although the actual called strike zone has always differed somewhat from the rulebook strike zone, but if the changes are put into effect for 2017, then pitchers might be feeling a little more squeezed next year.

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Is Tony Wolters the answer to 24 years of mile-high pitching woes?

Good-framing catchers, as best as we can define them, seem to have magical powers. They can “steal” extra strikes for their pitchers, and while it might not seem like much in the moment to get an extra borderline call, it adds up. The generally accepted consensus has been that the top framers can save their team 20 runs compared to a merely average framer. Compared to the bottom of the barrel, that swing is 40 runs. When the general public figured out how big that effect was, they rightly made a big deal about it. (When teams found out, they quietly made a big deal out of it. In fact, in Francisco Cervelli’s case, they just made more than 30 million big deals about it.)

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The super-cool, super-modern, super-fun strategy that might not be doing anything.

Last week, we looked into The Shift and whether it was actually doing what we said it was supposed to do, which is to be a better way of getting hitters, especially pull-happy hitters (and double especially groundball-heavy, pull-happy, left-handed hitters) to make more outs. The traditional story of The Shift is that because those hitters are going to be sending most of their ground balls to one side of the field, why not put more fielders over that way?

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Reevaluating the shiny new toy.

Here’s a cheeky question that I ask in complete sincerity: How many home runs were hit against The Shift last year? I’m sure someone out there knows the answer to the question, but there are probably more people wondering why I even bothered to ask it. If the ball was hit over the wall, what does it matter whether The Shift was on or not? Either way, the fielders weren’t going to be able to get to it.

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Testing the belief that ninth-inning losses hurt more.

There’s nothing more thrilling in baseball than a ninth-inning comeback. Unless, of course, it’s your team being victimized by the comeback. Then, there’s nothing worse. To have fought for eight innings and held the lead, only to have the game snatched away in the ninth. It might leave the other team breathless, but it will leave you with a nasty scar.

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'The implications of this are kinda big.'

It’s 2016 and Statcast is everyone’s favorite new toy. It’s not exactly a new toy, of course. Bits and pieces of the system were rolled out in 2014 and last year, there were plenty of chances for the data to make themselves known on game broadcasts. Baseball fans have begun to absorb a new set of numbers as they watch the game. Unlike some of the “advanced” stats that have come before Statcast, these are numbers that a lot of people had actively wondered about, but had very little ability to measure. How fast was he running on that play? That looked like a long way to run to make that catch, but how long was it?

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But will Arodys Vizcaino and the Braves move the needle?

If you made a list of the top six or seven stories from the first week of the 2016 season, I suppose that Trevor Story would be the top, uh, you know. Spaces 2 through 6 or 7 would be taken up by Bryce Harper’s hat, John Gibbons’ choice of gametime attire, Kyle Schwarber’s injury, Andrew McCutchen hitting in the no. 2 spot for the Pirates, Noah Syndergaard’s 95 mph slider, and perhaps Stephen Strasburg’s slider that doesn’t actually exist.

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Why your team's hopes aren't dead by the eighth inning, and why baseball isn't either.

Is the dramatic comeback dead? Tom Verducci of Sports Illustrated thinks that it is, and that it’s because teams have loaded up their bullpen with power-armed specialists who are just so good that if a team gets to the late innings with a lead, they are more likely to keep it, and thus scuttle the chances for someone to make a dramatic comeback in the late innings. A lot of the great games in baseball history involve late-inning heroics and comebacks from the brink. Everyone loves a comeback, but Verducci suggests that if the comeback becomes a lost art, it will suck all the life out of baseball.

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