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01-03

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36

Analyze This: Hot Spots: First Base, Third Base, and Designated Hitter
by
Rob McQuown

12-22

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16

Analyze This: Hot Spots: Outfield
by
Rob McQuown

11-30

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5

Analyze This: Tsuyoshi Nishioka
by
Jesse Behr

11-16

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13

Analyze This: Dark Horse Free Agents: Joaquin Benoit
by
Jesse Behr

11-12

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9

Analyze This: Hisashi Iwakuma
by
Jesse Behr

11-09

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8

Analyze This: Dark Horse Free Agents: Jon Garland
by
Jesse Behr

11-07

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14

Analyze This: Dark Horse Free Agents: Jorge De La Rosa
by
Jesse Behr

11-02

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1

Analyze This: How the Rangers were Acquired, Part II
by
Jesse Behr

11-01

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8

Analyze This: How the Rangers Were Acquired, Part I
by
Jesse Behr

10-30

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2

Analyze This: How the Giants Were Acquired, Part II
by
Jesse Behr

10-29

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7

Analyze This: How the Giants Were Acquired, Part I
by
Jesse Behr

10-10

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3

Analyze This: Foretelling Tim Hudson's Comeback
by
Jesse Behr

10-03

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5

Analyze This: Javier Vazquez, The Yankee
by
Jesse Behr

09-19

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15

Analyze This: Checking up on July Acquisitions
by
Jesse Behr

06-28

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0

Analyze This: Run Julio, Run
by
Craig Brown

03-16

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9

Analyze This: Hot Spots: Catcher, Second Base, and Shortstop
by
Michael Jong

02-23

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75

Analyze This: Building a Better Broadcast
by
Jon Sciambi

10-14

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0

Analyze This: Hope, Faith, Change, and Money
by
John Perrotto

09-04

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1

Analyze This: For What You Are About to Receive
by
Gary Huckabay

06-01

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0

Analyze This: You're Never Going To Believe This One
by
Jim Baker

10-25

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0

Analyze This: WWLLWW
by
Jim Baker

06-18

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0

Analyze This: Baltimore Orioles, Colorado Rockies, New York Mets
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-19

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0

Analyze This: We Need More Awards
by
Derek Zumsteg

09-12

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0

Analyze This: What's Up With the Chief?
by
Derek Zumsteg

09-11

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0

Analyze This: Best Hitter Outside Cooperstown
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-01

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0

Analyze This: Feeling Bitter
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-05

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0

Analyze This: Sticky Eyes
by
Derek Zumsteg

06-28

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0

Analyze This: Starting Over
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-02

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0

Analyze This: Light Breaks Through
by
Rany Jazayerli

<< Previous Column Entries Next Column Entries >>

Jesse Behr analyzes the malady that has been Javier Vazquez's 2010 season.

Analyze This is a new weekly blog series in which Special Assistant Jesse Behr looks at a variety of intriguing and comparable stats that could stir up some discussion. Today, we’ll look at Javier Vazquez’s two adventurous campaigns with the New York Yankees.

August 26, 2004 – NY Yankees vs. Cleveland
1.1 IP, 5 H 6 E, 2 BB, 1 SO


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Special Assistant Jesse Behr looks at a variety of intriguing and comparable stats that could stir up some discussion.

Analyze This is a new blog series in which special assistant Jesse Behr looks at a variety of intriguing and comparable stats that could stir up some discussion. Today, we’ll look at how a few key players have fared since getting dealt this past July in order of descending VORP:

Diamondbacks RHP Daniel Hudson

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June 28, 2010 2:47 pm

Analyze This: Run Julio, Run

0

Craig Brown

Julio Borbon is getting on base, but his value remains depressed because he's not stealing.

Julio Borbon’s statistical low point came on May 6th. Following a game against Kansas City where he went 0-4 in a 13-run Ranger effort, Borbon’s slash line dipped to .184/.202/.230.  He had come to the plate 91 times, collected just two extra base hits (both triples) and had just a single walk against 14 strikeouts.  The following evening, he went 2-3 and effectively took his season off life support.  In the 143 plate appearances since then, he’s hit .364/.397/.477.

The improved batting average is great, but what you really want is for Borbon to use his wheels and rack up the steals for your team.  Unfortunately, while he’s been getting on base more, the steals haven’t followed.  In fact, it’s been an outright disappointing base stealing year for the Ranger outfielder.  Here are his various base running rates from his two years in the majors:

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March 16, 2010 9:00 am

Analyze This: Hot Spots: Catcher, Second Base, and Shortstop

9

Michael Jong

Michael Jong reports on the injury replacements for Russell Martin in Los Angeles, the second base battles for the Dodgers and Cubs, and playing time changes in Tampa Bay.

Russell Martin was bound to regress a little after the fantasy nightmare that was the 2009 season. After posting batting averages in the .280-.290 range in each of his first three seasons, he batted .250 thanks to a career-low .284 BABIP. After hitting double-digit home runs in those three seasons, he hit just seven homers in 2009, posting a puny .079 ISO. And after averaging 20 steals in his last two full-time seasons, he only swiped 11 bags. Martin probably isn't the home run hitter he was in 2007 (HR/FB% of 12.2%), but neither is he the popless guy of 2009 (5.4% HR/FB%). With a regression to his career HR/FB% and BABIP, you could once again expect something close to the 2008 version of Martin.

But that will have to be put on hold as Martin will be out 4-6 weeks with a groin pull to start the year. Martin's replacements are fantasy duds. A.J. Ellis will get the bulk of the time at catcher, with Brad Ausmus serving his honorary backup/mentor role. In the minors, Ellis was known for one thing: drawing walks. In 1795 minor league PA, he's drawn 273 walks while striking out 248 times. He also has a minor-league ISO of just .100, with only 17 home runs. Essentially, he walks like Adam Dunn, with Juan Pierre power and Bengie Molina speed. Ausmus is a man who needs no introduction, because he should never be on your fantasy team.

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ESPN's Jon Sciambi has some ideas on how sabermetrics can be introduced to all fans during telecasts.

Jon Sciambi, who does play-by-play of Major League Baseball games for ESPN, has been kind enough to grace the Baseball Prospectus site with a guest column.

Let me tell you about an argument I had with Chipper Jones. Last year, I came across an interesting nugget on Fangraphs while doing pre-game prep: Besides Albert Pujols, Chipper sees the fewest first-pitch strikes in the majors.

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October 14, 2007 12:00 am

Analyze This: Hope, Faith, Change, and Money

0

John Perrotto

Turnover in the front office and with the big-market-success paradigm makes for interesting times ahead.

Before the season started, this website ran a series of team previews called "Hope and Faith" in which the writers gave a scenario in which each of the 30 major-league clubs could win it all in 2007. That series title was a play on one of Commissioner Bud Selig's favorite phrases, in which he likes to say fans can now use that phrase more than ever because Major League Baseball's revenue-sharing plan has brought about parity.

While fans in places like Pittsburgh, Kansas City and St. Petersburg might have a problem buying into hope and faith, the participants in this year's League Championship Series show that a large payroll does not automatically guarantee a team an invitation to October. In fact, three of the four teams still standing began the season with payrolls among the eight lowest in the major leagues. The Indians ranked 23rd among the 30 clubs at $62 million, while the Rockies were 25th at $54 million, and the Diamondbacks were 26th at $52 million. The Red Sox are the last of the big spenders still playing, as their Opening Day payroll of $143 million was second in the majors only to the $190 million spent by the Yankees, who have already been knocked off by the Indians in the ALDS.

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BP's founder makes his comeback bearing an unsettling message.

Itís been an unfortunate part of writing for BP that Iíve written a number of words about the passing of friends. Today, Iíve got another obituary to write, but this one is not in the least bit painful.

Baseball analysis is dead.

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June 1, 2007 12:00 am

Analyze This: You're Never Going To Believe This One

0

Jim Baker

Jim flashes back to last month, when an unlikely source gave one young reporter the story of a lifetime.

I was working the city desk on a slow night in May when my phone started ringing off the hook. It was Skip, a dish jockey at a midtown chop house; just one of the dozens of soda jerks, bellboys, elevator operators, manicurists, hack drivers, switchboard divas, pin monkeys, and counter clerks I kept on retainer to feed me tidbits of dope from which I could build stories. I was only two years on the job and still needed a magnifying glass to find something to shave every morning, but I knew this much: you're only as good as your leads.

"What's on your lip, Skip?"

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October 25, 2005 12:00 am

Analyze This: WWLLWW

0

Jim Baker

Jim looks at the White Sox' lead over the Astros, and how 2-0 leads have held up through history.

On being down 2-0
For those still floating on the artificial high of

Scott


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The Orioles may land two players in the All-Star Game. The Rockies are carrying too many disappointments. The Mets may have rushed Jose Reyes. These and other nuggets out of Baltimore, Colorado, and New York in the latest Prospectus Triple Play.

 

Baltimore Orioles

 

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It's been suggested that there should be different awards, so the MVP would be split into (essentially) the Best Player and the Best Player for a Contender Awards (stackable). This won't ever happen, if for no other reason than the fact that MVP votes are writers who need topics, and no topic's better than themselves and the importance of their jobs.

I understand why sports columnists write about their soul-rending debates over who should get their MVP or Cy Young vote (or hypothetical vote). When I wrote for the Daily Prospectus once in a while, it was easy to write when the Muse spoke to me (of games and the men, skilled in all forms of contending). Now that I'm trying to work in a regular, longer format, the blank Document1 window stares back at me as I go through that week's notes, and I find myself wishing I had something as easy, as gift-wrapped for discussion as who I'd vote for my MVP and Cy Young.

It's been suggested that there should be different awards, so the MVP would be split into (essentially) the Best Player and the Best Player for a Contender Awards (stackable). This won't ever happen, if for no other reason than the fact that MVP votes are writers who need topics, and no topic's better than themselves and the importance of their jobs.

Read the full article...

Tipping Freddy Garcia

The most rewarding thing about getting into sabermetrics is having more tools on the workbench. To me, it's what Prospectus is all about: furthering our understanding of baseball, the same as SABR, or Retrosheet, or in a weird way, the bartender who insists on telling me stories of how Bob Gibson would pitch to the score. I'm probably the least stat-heady member of the authors, prone to taking shortcuts to rough some stats out and see if there's something interesting there instead of making sure I've included sacrifice bunts in my runner advancement data. But I love the investigation.

There's been a rumor that Freddy Garcia, who last year appeared to be an ascending ace, has been tipping his pitches, and that's why opposing teams have been teeing off on him. I regard stories like this with a lot of skepticism: most pitching coaches watch a lot of video and wouldn't be oblivious to this sort of thing, so the possibility a pitcher's struggling and, say, Bryan Price didn't think of it is slim. What happens in a local media cycle is this:

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