Biographical

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Jack Morris PTigers

Tigers Player Cards | Tigers Team Audit | Tigers Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years IP W L SV SO ERA WARP
18 3824 254 186 0 2478 3.90 33.3
Birth Date5-16-1955
Height6' 3"
Weight195 lbs
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

Standard

YEAR TEAM AGE G GS IP IP-SP IP-RP W L SV BS QS BQS PA H R ER HR TB BB UBB HBP SO ERA FIP FRA VORP WARP
1977 DET 22 7 6 45.7 41.7 4.0 1 1 0 0 4 0 189 38 20 19 4 58 23 23 0 28 3.74 4.17 4.86 2.2 0.2
1978 DET 23 28 7 106.0 32.3 73.7 3 5 0 2 4 0 469 107 57 51 8 149 49 44 3 48 4.33 4.10 4.54 5.7 0.6
1979 DET 24 27 27 197.7 197.7 0.0 17 7 0 0 18 3 806 179 76 72 19 267 59 55 4 113 3.28 3.83 4.72 13.7 1.4
1980 DET 25 36 36 250.0 250.0 0.0 16 15 0 0 16 8 1074 252 125 116 20 364 87 82 4 112 4.18 3.99 4.51 19.7 2.1
1981 DET 26 25 25 198.0 198.0 0.0 14 7 0 0 17 2 798 153 69 67 14 234 78 67 2 97 3.05 3.69 4.42 7.5 0.8
1982 DET 27 37 37 266.3 266.3 0.0 17 16 0 0 19 5 1107 247 131 120 37 408 96 89 0 135 4.06 4.56 5.65 -6.1 -0.6
1983 DET 28 37 37 293.7 293.7 0.0 20 13 0 0 26 3 1204 257 117 109 30 400 83 78 3 232 3.34 3.45 4.01 34.8 3.7
1984 DET 29 35 35 240.3 240.3 0.0 19 11 0 0 23 2 1015 221 108 96 20 324 87 80 2 148 3.60 3.71 4.34 18.5 2.0
1985 DET 30 35 35 257.0 257.0 0.0 16 11 0 0 26 1 1077 212 102 95 21 321 110 103 5 191 3.33 3.66 4.08 30.3 3.2
1986 DET 31 35 35 267.0 267.0 0.0 21 8 0 0 20 5 1092 229 105 97 40 403 82 75 0 223 3.27 3.99 4.32 30.6 3.2
1987 DET 32 34 34 266.0 266.0 0.0 18 11 0 0 21 7 1101 227 111 100 39 389 93 86 1 208 3.38 4.28 4.75 25.2 2.1
1988 DET 33 34 34 235.0 235.0 0.0 15 13 0 0 20 2 997 225 115 103 20 336 83 76 4 168 3.94 3.61 4.07 26.7 2.9
1989 DET 34 24 24 170.3 170.3 0.0 6 14 0 0 11 4 743 189 102 92 23 301 59 56 2 115 4.86 4.33 4.40 12.8 1.4
1990 DET 35 36 36 249.7 249.7 0.0 15 18 0 0 18 3 1073 231 144 125 26 357 97 84 6 162 4.51 4.10 4.66 17.7 1.9
1991 MIN 36 35 35 246.7 246.7 0.0 18 12 0 0 20 2 1032 226 107 94 18 320 92 87 5 163 3.43 3.72 4.45 29.7 3.1
1992 TOR 37 34 34 240.7 240.7 0.0 21 6 0 0 19 2 1005 222 114 108 18 323 80 78 10 132 4.04 3.79 4.40 20.7 2.3
1993 TOR 38 27 27 152.7 152.7 0.0 7 12 0 0 8 1 702 189 116 105 18 286 65 63 3 103 6.19 4.52 5.06 14.6 1.5
1994 CLE 39 23 23 141.3 141.3 0.0 10 6 0 0 10 2 636 163 96 88 14 248 67 65 4 100 5.60 4.58 5.25 15.4 1.5
Career5495273824.03746.377.72541860230052161203567181516573895488139012915824783.903.964.54319.833.3

Advanced

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP FRA FRA+ TAv oppAVG oppOBP oppSLG oppTAv BABIP PPF PVORP PWARP VORP WARP
1977 DET MLB 7 6 45.7 4.86 96 .246 .262 .322 .389 .259 .254 103 2.2 0.2 2.2 0.2
1978 DET MLB 28 7 106.0 4.54 96 .270 .263 .325 .389 .267 .274 103 5.7 0.6 5.7 0.6
1979 DET MLB 27 27 197.7 4.72 102 .234 .267 .330 .406 .265 .262 102 13.7 1.4 13.7 1.4
1979 EVV AAA 5 5 34.0 0.00 0 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1980 DET MLB 36 36 250.0 4.51 103 .256 .269 .326 .400 .267 .273 103 19.7 2.1 19.7 2.1
1981 DET MLB 25 25 198.0 4.42 94 .234 .256 .317 .373 .260 .229 101 7.5 0.8 7.5 0.8
1982 DET MLB 37 37 266.3 5.65 74 .256 .261 .325 .398 .264 .250 100 -6.1 -0.6 -6.1 -0.6
1983 DET MLB 37 37 293.7 4.01 110 .239 .265 .327 .399 .266 .265 99 34.8 3.7 34.8 3.7
1984 DET MLB 35 35 240.3 4.34 98 .245 .264 .325 .398 .266 .265 95 18.5 2.0 18.5 2.0
1985 DET MLB 35 35 257.0 4.08 107 .243 .261 .327 .402 .266 .255 96 30.3 3.2 30.3 3.2
1986 DET MLB 35 35 267.0 4.32 106 .246 .262 .326 .405 .265 .253 99 30.6 3.2 30.6 3.2
1987 DET MLB 34 34 266.0 4.75 103 .239 .265 .331 .425 .264 .247 99 26.2 2.6 25.2 2.1
1988 DET MLB 34 34 235.0 4.07 105 .261 .260 .324 .392 .268 .284 97 26.7 2.9 26.7 2.9
1989 DET MLB 24 24 170.3 4.40 99 .287 .264 .323 .386 .265 .305 100 12.8 1.4 12.8 1.4
1989 LAK A+ 3 3 8.0 0.00 0 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1990 DET MLB 36 36 249.7 4.66 95 .257 .261 .327 .390 .263 .262 102 17.7 1.9 17.7 1.9
1991 MIN MLB 35 35 246.7 4.45 105 .237 .260 .327 .395 .266 .276 105 29.7 3.1 29.7 3.1
1992 TOR MLB 34 34 240.7 4.40 100 .248 .260 .328 .388 .266 .267 102 20.7 2.3 20.7 2.3
1993 TOR MLB 27 27 152.7 5.06 97 .288 .268 .335 .407 .264 .333 103 14.6 1.5 14.6 1.5
1994 CLE MLB 23 23 141.3 5.25 101 .275 .272 .346 .429 .267 .330 100 15.4 1.5 15.4 1.5

Statistics For All Levels

Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
Year Team Lg W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR GB% BABIP H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 WHIP ERA VORP WARP
1977 DET MLB 1 1 0 7 6 45.7 38 23 28 4 61% .254 7.5 4.5 0.8 5.5 1.34 3.74 2.2 0.2
1978 DET MLB 3 5 0 28 7 106.0 107 49 48 8 52% .274 9.1 4.2 0.7 4.1 1.47 4.33 5.7 0.6
1979 EVV AAA 2 2 0 5 5 34.0 22 18 28 4 0% .000 5.8 4.8 1.1 7.4 1.18 2.38 0.0 0.0
1979 DET MLB 17 7 0 27 27 197.7 179 59 113 19 61% .262 8.2 2.7 0.9 5.1 1.20 3.28 13.7 1.4
1980 DET MLB 16 15 0 36 36 250.0 252 87 112 20 55% .273 9.1 3.1 0.7 4.0 1.36 4.18 19.7 2.1
1981 DET MLB 14 7 0 25 25 198.0 153 78 97 14 52% .229 7.0 3.5 0.6 4.4 1.17 3.05 7.5 0.8
1982 DET MLB 17 16 0 37 37 266.3 247 96 135 37 52% .250 8.3 3.2 1.3 4.6 1.29 4.06 -6.1 -0.6
1983 DET MLB 20 13 0 37 37 293.7 257 83 232 30 51% .265 7.9 2.5 0.9 7.1 1.16 3.34 34.8 3.7
1984 DET MLB 19 11 0 35 35 240.3 221 87 148 20 50% .265 8.3 3.3 0.7 5.5 1.28 3.60 18.5 2.0
1985 DET MLB 16 11 0 35 35 257.0 212 110 191 21 48% .255 7.4 3.9 0.7 6.7 1.25 3.33 30.3 3.2
1986 DET MLB 21 8 0 35 35 267.0 229 82 223 40 44% .253 7.7 2.8 1.3 7.5 1.16 3.27 30.6 3.2
1987 DET MLB 18 11 0 34 34 266.0 227 93 208 39 45% .247 7.7 3.1 1.3 7.0 1.20 3.38 25.2 2.1
1988 DET MLB 15 13 0 34 34 235.0 225 83 168 20 44% .284 8.6 3.2 0.8 6.4 1.31 3.94 26.7 2.9
1989 LAK A+ 0 0 0 3 3 8.0 7 0 2 0 0% .000 7.9 0.0 0.0 2.2 0.88 2.25 0.0 0.0
1989 DET MLB 6 14 0 24 24 170.3 189 59 115 23 45% .305 10.0 3.1 1.2 6.1 1.46 4.86 12.8 1.4
1990 DET MLB 15 18 0 36 36 249.7 231 97 162 26 44% .262 8.3 3.5 0.9 5.8 1.31 4.51 17.7 1.9
1991 MIN MLB 18 12 0 35 35 246.7 226 92 163 18 46% .276 8.2 3.4 0.7 5.9 1.29 3.43 29.7 3.1
1992 TOR MLB 21 6 0 34 34 240.7 222 80 132 18 47% .267 8.3 3.0 0.7 4.9 1.25 4.04 20.7 2.3
1993 TOR MLB 7 12 0 27 27 152.7 189 65 103 18 51% .333 11.1 3.8 1.1 6.1 1.66 6.19 14.6 1.5
1994 CLE MLB 10 6 0 23 23 141.3 163 67 100 14 46% .330 10.4 4.3 0.9 6.4 1.63 5.60 15.4 1.5

Plate Discipline

YEAR PITCHES ZONE_RT SWING_RT CONTACT_RT Z_SWING_RT O_SWING_RT Z_CONTACT_RT O_CONTACT_RT SW_STRK_RT

Injury History

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
1993-05-02 1993-05-21 15-DL 19 16 Right Shoulder Inflammation Tendonitis - -
1989-05-23 1989-07-24 60-DL 62 54 Right Elbow Inflammation Bone Chips - -

Compensation

Year Team Salary

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status

Details

BP Annual Player Comments

No BP Book Comments have been found for this player.

BP Articles

Jack Morris is referenced in the following articles.

BP Premium requires BP Premium access to view, BP Fantasy requires BP Premium or BP Fantasy access to view

  Title Author Date
This article requires BP Premium accessThe HOF Rule Change: What Happens After 10 Years?Mike Gianella2014-07-28
This article requires BP Premium accessWhat You Need to Know: The A's Get Rick-RolledChris Mosch2014-07-02
Perfect Game Presents: The Baseball Draft: A 50-Year Retrospective, Part TwoAllan Simpson2014-06-09
This article requires BP Premium accessChanging Speeds: The 2014 Hall of Famously Weak Arguments, Part OneKen Funck2014-01-21
BP Unfiltered: Rereading Nate Silver: 17. The Holes In Adam Dunn's SwingSam Miller2014-01-10
The BP Wayback Machine: The Old You're In, You're OutJoe Sheehan2014-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessBaseball Therapy: The Hall of Fame Ballots By the NumbersRussell A. Carleton2014-01-09
A Vote for Transparency: How Secret Ballots Skewed the Hall of Fame Election ResultsLewie Pollis2014-01-09
The Lineup Card: Seven Pioneers Worthy of Hall of Fame InductionBaseball Prospectus2014-01-08
BP Hall of Fame Voting: The 2014 ResultsBaseball Prospectus2014-01-08
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: What the 1936 Hall of Fame Ballot Tells Us About Today'sZachary Levine2014-01-07
This article requires BP Premium accessRaising Aces: The Good Old Days: Nolan RyanDoug Thorburn2014-01-03
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: Better Versions of Bad Hall of Fame ArgumentsZachary Levine2014-01-02
Baseball ProGUESTus: The (Ad) Age of Heroes: Judging the 2014 Hall of Fame Candidates by Their CommercialsMichael Clair2013-12-18
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: A Cooperstown Party Like it's 1999Zachary Levine2013-12-12
This article requires BP Premium accessTransaction Analysis: Feldman Aims for the StarsCraig Goldstein2013-12-06
This article requires BP Premium accessTransaction Analysis: Feldman Aims for the StarsRussell A. Carleton2013-12-06
This article requires BP Premium accessBaseball Therapy: The Effects of the Shutdown (Inning)Russell A. Carleton2013-10-21
BP Unfiltered: ERA, Falling SlowlyAndrew Koo2013-07-25
Overthinking It: This Week in Catcher Framing, 5/10Ben Lindbergh2013-05-10
This article requires BP Premium accessWhat You Need to Know: The Hot StartersDaniel Rathman2013-05-06
The Week in Quotes: April 29-May 5Pete Barrett2013-05-06
The Week in Quotes: April 29-May 5Andrew Koo2013-05-06
The Week in Quotes: April 29-May 5Jonah Birenbaum2013-05-06
BP Unfiltered: The Flimsy Case Against Clay BuchholzDan Rozenson2013-05-03
Overthinking It: This Week in Catcher Framing, 5/3Ben Lindbergh2013-05-03
Wezen-Ball: A Few of Baseball's Best MomentsLarry Granillo2013-04-19
Baseball ProGUESTus: When Good Things Come in Three YearsChad Finn2013-04-17
BP Unfiltered: The Most Surprising Players with StatuesBen Lindbergh2013-03-15
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: It's No Good to Get Old (Except for These Guys)Zachary Levine2013-03-04
Wezen-Ball: An Ultimate Road TripLarry Granillo2013-01-16
This article requires BP Premium accessSobsequy: How to Hit, According to Kevin LongAdam Sobsey2013-01-16
This article requires BP Premium accessWestern Front: Zeroes and OnesGeoff Young2013-01-15
Overthinking It: Has the Sabermetric Movement Been Bad for Jack Morris?Ben Lindbergh2013-01-10
On the Beat: A Change in the ProcessJohn Perrotto2013-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessBaseball Therapy: Lessons from the Hall of Fame VoteRussell A. Carleton2013-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: Murphy, Morris, and Using the Full 15 BallotsZachary Levine2013-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessPebble Hunting: When the Teams That Don't Have Hall of Famers Yet Will Have Hall of FamersSam Miller2013-01-10
This article requires BP Fantasy or Premium accessResident Fantasy Genius: The Voting TravestyDerek Carty2013-01-10
BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 116: Has the Sabermetric Movement Helped or Hurt Jack Morris?Sam Miller2013-01-10
BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 116: Has the Sabermetric Movement Helped or Hurt Jack Morris?Ben Lindbergh2013-01-10
Manufactured Runs: What Hall of Fame Voters are Doing to the Hall of FameColin Wyers2013-01-10
Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jack MorrisLarry Granillo2013-01-09
BP Unfiltered: Is Jack Morris the Best Pitcher of an Era?Colin Wyers2013-01-08
BP Unfiltered: Time to Push the Reset ButtonDave Studeman2013-01-07
On the Beat: The Hall of Fame BallotJohn Perrotto2013-01-03
In A Pickle: That Blank ExpressionJason Wojciechowski2013-01-03
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: My Lost Weekend with FootballZachary Levine2012-12-18
This article requires BP Premium accessIn A Pickle: Winners and Losers of Winning and LosingJason Wojciechowski2012-12-13
This article requires BP Premium accessSobsequy: Ferguson Jenkins, Tommy John, and How Some Players End Up Outside the HallAdam Sobsey2012-12-12
This article requires BP Premium accessTransaction Analysis: Dodgers Go Big for GreinkeSam Miller2012-12-10
Wezen-Ball: 37 Candidates, 37 (non-PED) ExcusesLarry Granillo2012-12-04
This article requires BP Premium accessSkewed Left: Could We See a Blank Hall of Fame Ballot in 2013?Zachary Levine2012-12-04
Baseball ProGUESTus: What Mainstream Baseball Analysis Looked Like in 1984Chad Finn2012-11-27
The Lineup Card: 11 Memories From Watching Our First World SeriesBaseball Prospectus2012-10-24
The Lineup Card: Seven August Moves that MatteredBaseball Prospectus2012-08-01
Prospectus Hit and Run: Sizzling StartsJay Jaffe2012-04-18
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Loose Threads: West DivisionJay Jaffe2012-04-04
Baseball ProGUESTus: The Tensest Series of All TimeDave Studeman2012-04-03
BP Unfiltered: The Weakest Of The WeakKen Funck2012-02-06
This article requires BP Premium accessOverthinking It: The Overlooked Overlooked Hall of FamersBen Lindbergh2012-02-02
Baseball Prospectus Book News: Extra Innings: More Baseball Between the Numbers Available for Pre-OrderSteven Goldman2012-01-30
This article requires BP Premium accessInside The Park: Why We Want Players to Remember the PastBradford Doolittle2012-01-26
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Platoon Advantage: TwinsFest Cognitive DissonanceBill Parker2012-01-25
This article requires BP Premium accessChanging Speeds: The Hall of Famously Weak Arguments, Part IKen Funck2012-01-18
BP Unfiltered: Visualizing Our Jack Morris FixationBen Lindbergh2012-01-17
This article requires BP Premium accessThe BP Broadside: 1987: The Silver Jubilee, Part ISteven Goldman2012-01-17
Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in MotionJonathan Bernhardt2012-01-13
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Keeper Reaper: Starting Pitchers for 1/12/12Mike Petriello2012-01-12
BP Unfiltered: Watching Jack PlayColin Wyers2012-01-10
The Lineup Card: Switched at Birth: 14 Players Who Look Like Other PeopleBaseball Prospectus2012-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Barry, Black Jack, and the Big Ballot SurgesJay Jaffe2012-01-10
Wezen-Ball: HOF Candidates as ProspectsLarry Granillo2012-01-08
Wezen-Ball: The Descriptive HOF Ballot, 2011Larry Granillo2012-01-05
The BP Wayback Machine: Pitching to the ScoreGreg Spira2011-12-30
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to CloseJay Jaffe2011-12-30
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle InfieldersJay Jaffe2011-12-19
Prospectus Hit and Run: The Golden Era Ballot for the Hall of FameJay Jaffe2011-11-22
The Lineup Card: 9 World Series Heroes: The Year AfterBaseball Prospectus2011-11-03
Wezen-Ball: Player Rankings for Type A/B Calculations, 1982-1984Larry Granillo2011-11-02
This article requires BP Premium accessWorld Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps RollingJay Jaffe2011-10-28
The Lineup Card: 13 Iconic Instances of Facial HairBaseball Prospectus2011-10-19
The Lineup Card: 9 Baseball Movies That Should Be MadeBaseball Prospectus2011-09-21
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Junkballin'Jay Jaffe2011-09-15
The BP Broadside: "Compiler" Jim Thome for the Hall of FameSteven Goldman2011-08-16
The BP Broadside: David Cone, All Is ForgivenSteven Goldman2011-07-21
Wezen-Ball: Collisions at the PlateLarry Granillo2011-05-27
Baseball Prospectus Press Release: BP Announces Free Public Access to ArchivesBaseball Prospectus2011-05-23
Wezen-Ball: Baseball When You're 10Larry Granillo2011-04-12
Spitballing: Trading PlacesJeremy Greenhouse2011-04-07
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the BasementJay Jaffe2011-03-22
This article requires BP Premium accessChanging Speeds: Baseball on the OnesKen Funck2011-03-22
Baseball ProGUESTus: The Impact of World Series Starts (or How Much Was Jack Morris Really Worth?)Sean Smith2011-03-04
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Dandy Andy Bows OutJay Jaffe2011-02-04
The Week in Quotes: January 3-9Alex Carnevale2011-01-10
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Blyleven in '11 and Other Tales from the BallotJay Jaffe2011-01-06
BP Podcast: Episode 32: This Doesn't Smell RightKevin Goldstein2011-01-05
Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Relief at ListJay Jaffe2011-01-05
On the Beat: One Man's BallotJohn Perrotto2011-01-04
Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: No Shortage of Quality ShortstopsJay Jaffe2010-12-29
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Starting PitchersJay Jaffe2010-12-20
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Marvin Miller and Pat GillickJay Jaffe2010-11-16
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Q&A: Jerry Howarth, Part IIDavid Laurila2010-11-03
This article requires BP Premium accessPlayoff Prospectus: Like Drinking Coffee with a ForkJay Jaffe2010-10-19
This article requires BP Premium accessChanging Speeds: Closing TimeKen Funck2010-09-30
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Disasterpiece TheaterJay Jaffe2010-09-29
This article requires BP Premium accessAnother Look: Hall of Fame Pitchers Becoming an Extinct SpeciesBob Hertzel2010-09-21
Manufactured Runs: By Land, Sea, and AirColin Wyers2010-08-04
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: Jacktastic!Jay Jaffe2010-06-30
You Can Blog It Up: Dead Player of the Day and Other Notes #2Steven Goldman2010-03-30
This article requires BP Premium accessYou Could Look It Up: Get Back in Line, Part 2Steven Goldman2010-02-21
The Week in Quotes: January 4-10Alex Carnevale2010-01-11
Prospectus Hit and Run: Hawk, Rock, and a Couple of ShocksJay Jaffe2010-01-07
Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for PitchersJay Jaffe2010-01-06
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: Virtual Hall-Worthy SelectionsJoe Sheehan2009-12-30
This article requires BP Premium accessOn the Beat: Weekend UpdateJohn Perrotto2009-12-27
Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases at Third and ShortJay Jaffe2009-12-23
This article requires BP Premium accessOn the Beat: Thanksgiving Weekend UpdateJohn Perrotto2009-11-29
This article requires BP Premium accessYou Could Look It Up: He Should Have Picked LeeSteven Goldman2009-11-01
Prospectus Q&A: Edwin JacksonDavid Laurila2009-10-11
Prospectus Idol Entry: The 1991 World Series: An Adventure in Championship ExpectancyMatt Swartz2009-06-21
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The Next 300-Game Winner?Joe Sheehan2009-06-06
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Q&A: Bert BlylevenDavid Laurila2009-05-10
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: The PitchersJay Jaffe2009-01-12
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Hit and Run: The InfieldersJay Jaffe2009-01-11
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The Old You're In, You're OutJoe Sheehan2008-12-18
This article requires BP Premium accessOn the Beat: One Man's Hall of Fame VoteJohn Perrotto2008-12-03
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: Moose TracksJoe Sheehan2008-11-24
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: NLCS Game Two and ALCS Game OneJoe Sheehan2008-10-11
Prospectus Q&A: Cito GastonDavid Laurila2008-09-07
Lies, Damned Lies: The Ultimate Fantasy DraftNate Silver2008-08-21
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Preview: Monday's Games to WatchCaleb Peiffer2008-06-30
This article requires BP Premium accessEvery Given Sunday: Under ReviewJohn Perrotto2008-05-25
UTK Wrap: At the RacesWill Carroll2008-05-09
This article requires BP Premium accessUnder The Knife: Much BetterWill Carroll2008-05-06
This article requires BP Premium accessUnder The Knife: No FoolingWill Carroll2008-04-01
This article requires BP Premium accessUnder The Knife: Opening Day HurtsWill Carroll2008-03-31
The Week in Quotes: March 24-30Alex Carnevale2008-03-31
This article requires BP Premium accessDoctoring The Numbers: Royals and PhilliesRany Jazayerli2008-03-25
This article requires BP Premium accessYou Could Look It Up: Topping the Twins, Part DeuxSteven Goldman2008-02-18
Prospectus Today: Goose, Rice, and ConfettiJoe Sheehan2008-01-09
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Matchups: Dead Horses and Fifth StartersJim Baker2008-01-04
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2008: The Starting PitchersJay Jaffe2008-01-03
Prospectus Today: My BallotJoe Sheehan2007-12-28
This article requires BP Premium accessEvery Given Sunday: Holiday GiftsJohn Perrotto2007-12-23
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2008: The Hitters, Part OneJay Jaffe2007-12-12
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Matchups: Blowing Hot and ColdJim Baker2007-09-14
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The Buehrle DilemmaJoe Sheehan2007-06-28
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2007: The PitchersJay Jaffe2007-01-09
Prospectus Today: The ConundrumJoe Sheehan2007-01-09
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: My Hall of Fame BallotJoe Sheehan2007-01-05
World Series Prospectus: Fire Up the Wayback MachineChristina Kahrl2006-10-24
This article requires BP Premium accessUnder The Knife: The End of the DLWill Carroll2006-08-28
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The ElectionJoe Sheehan2006-01-11
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The BallotJoe Sheehan2006-01-09
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2006: Starting PitchersJay Jaffe2005-12-16
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2006: The HittersJay Jaffe2005-12-12
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Matchups: Feels Like the First TimeJim Baker2005-10-21
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Game of the Week: Houston Astros @ Atlanta Braves, 5/8/05Jonah Keri2005-05-10
Prospectus Triple Play: Arizona Diamondbacks, Detroit Tigers, Kansas City RoyalsCaleb Peiffer2005-03-25
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2005: The PitchersJay Jaffe2004-12-20
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: The HoldoversJoe Sheehan2004-12-01
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Q&A: J.P. Ricciardi, Part IIIJonah Keri2004-09-01
This article requires BP Premium accessYou Could Look It Up: Managers Reconsidered, Part IISteven Goldman2004-05-05
Aim For The Head: Hidden Perfect GamesKeith Woolner2004-04-27
Prospectus Triple Play: Montreal Expos, San Francisco Giants, Toronto Blue JaysBaseball Prospectus2004-03-19
Marginal Payroll/Marginal Wins: 1977-1979Doug Pappas2004-03-09
This article requires BP Premium accessYou Could Look It Up: 1984 Part I: Sparky Was WatchingSteven Goldman2004-02-17
This article requires BP Premium accessThe Class of 2004: Analyzing the PitchersJay Jaffe2004-01-14
The Class of 2004: Analyzing the HittersJay Jaffe2004-01-06
2004 Internet Hall of Fame: The Results Are InNeal Traven2004-01-05
This article requires BP Premium accessProspectus Today: Raffy RoundtableJoe Sheehan2003-05-13
The Jack Morris Project: Does Jack Morris Belong in the Hall of Fame?Joe Sheehan2003-04-24
BP Does Tout Wars: How PECOTA FaredNate Silver2003-03-21
BP Does Tout Wars: How PECOTA FaredJonah Keri2003-03-21
The Proper Support: Did Bert Blyleven Receive it?Greg Spira2003-03-06
Transaction Analysis: February 10-18, 2003Christina Kahrl2003-02-21
Prospectus Feature: The Yankees' Seven-Man RotationNate Silver2003-02-11
Prospectus Feature: The 1987 Free Agent MarketNate Silver2003-01-14
2003 Internet Hall Of Fame Results: Presented by STATLG-L and Baseball ProspectusNeal Traven2003-01-06


BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2014-06-26 14:00:00 (link to chat)Better Hall of Famer: Jack Morris or Zack Morris?
(Tim from Arkansas)
Dude. Are you just going to lob pitches over the plate so I can knock them over the park? Zack Morris. First ballot. Beautiful hair. (J.P. Breen)
2013-01-14 14:00:00 (link to chat)Why is it that when no players get voted into the Hall of Fame, sabermetrics and sabermetricians get blamed for it? For humor purposes, Mitch Williams of MLB Network blames Ivy League schools like Yale and Harvard as to why stats are bigger factors in scouting, awards and HOF voting. Not sure when exactly going to Yale or Harvard suddenly became a "bad thing." I boils my blood when I hear on sports radio evening shows that "stat geeks" and nerds don't vote in PED users or players that are "very good" and not-so-much all-time greats.
(jlarsen from Chicago)
Is this a thing people are saying? I haven't heard anyone blaming stat geeks and nerds for not electing PED guys. If anything, it tends to be the traditionalists leaving them off their ballots. I'd think Jack Morris was the only candidate who might have been hurt by the increased influence of advanced stats, which I wrote about last week. (Ben Lindbergh)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Fill in the blank: If I think Jack Morris is an HOF'er but not Craig Biggio, Jeff Bagwell, and- for Pete's sake!- Edgar Martinez, I am a _______.
(Eusebio from Houston)
...believer that election to the Hall of Fame should be based on narrative rather than statistical evidence. (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Dave Steib trounces Jack Morris in career JAWS. Do you think the average HoF voter knows that?
(Jim Clancy from Exhibition Stadium)
The average HOF voter probably couldn't give a shit about JAWS; the above-average voter may, however, and I applaud his or her good taste. The average voter also couldn't give a shit about Stieb, who received just 1.4 percent of the vote in 2004, a year that Morris received 26.3 percent. Back then, I had the two right about even in what wasn't even yet named JAWS and still used a 5-consecutive season definition of peak: http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=2510 (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio are both easily Top 15 players all-time at their position (and Bagwell maybe even Top 5); Schilling is one of the best RH pitchers of the last fifty years, both regular season and certainly post-season, couldn't even get 40%; Bernie Williams and Kenny Lofton, two of the best CF of the last 30 years, didn't even get enough to stay on the ballot. How broken is the system? Can it even be fixed? What would you say to someone that says that, considering there are mediocre guys that have been elected and excellent ones that have been snubbed, that the Hall of Fame has been rendered meaningless as an honor?
(Ashitaka1110 from Houston, TX)
I don't think the system is as broken as you suggest, by any means - one year is a small sample size by which to judge the results you mention. Bagwell and Biggio will be in very soon. I have Bernie well below the standard, and Lofton slightly below, so I can't really get too up in arms over that portion of what you wrote.

The Hall is still a pretty great honor; even if some of the wrong guys are getting in, to me it's far more worth fighting for the right guys getting in than walking away in disgust. The presence of Jim Rice or even Jack Morris in Cooperstown shouldn't ruin it for anyone. (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Jay, if I remember correctly, your general view on setting the bar for admission is that new Hall of Famers should be at least as good as current HOFers at their position, as measured by JAWS. Are there any positions or time periods for which you would like to see the bar lowered? (For example, third basemen seem generally underrepresented to me, as do 1970s position players and 1980s pitchers.)
(Rob from DC)
Well, adjusting for position distribution, as I began doing last year, is one way to lower the standards a hair to account for shortcomings. Another is to simply note the lack of representation at a given position for a given era. Telling me that Jack Morris led the majors in wins in a given 10-year stretch doesn't move the needle for me, telling me he led the majors in WAR among pitchers for a 10-year stretch is a supporting point beyond the simple JAWS yes/no. (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2013-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)Thanks for doing these chats; I always appreciate insights from someone with front-office experience. Here's a Q pertaining to that experience. One of the arguments against Jack Morris as a Hall of Famer is that pitchers like him in his generation -- Dave Stieb, Frank Tanana, etc. -- got rejected by HoF voters very quickly. My question is: if guys like Stieb and Tanana were so good, why weren't the high rollers of the time bidding for their services when they hit free agency? Was there an unspoken rule (collusion?) against poaching other GMs' free agents? Or did they not understand talent evaluation very well? Something else?
(Bill from New Mexico)
I enjoy these chats, Bill from New Mexico. Thanks for your question. I saw Morris a ton during his career, as I worked in the AL my first 19 years in the game and was in the same league. Jack Morris was damn good, a winner, and a guy who grinned out wins and threw tons of innings. It is hard to evaluate each player's career in regards to roster decisions unles you're his agent, because that's the only person who really knows what was really out there. I certainly did not reject him as a HOF candidate, just felt he was REALLY good, not HOF. (Dan Evans)
2012-12-11 13:00:00 (link to chat)Would you rather a) see Tim Raines and Jack Morris go into the Hall of Fame together this year or b) see neither of them ever go in?
(carligula from Oakland)
I feel sort of like a jerk for saying this, but probably neither. I don't really like that that's my answer; it seems really petty, and certainly there's more happiness in the world if more people feel special than if fewer do. I just think Morris is further below the standard than Raines is above it. I also think undeserved praise has a way of backfiring, and makes people bat down that praise with greater ferocity. If Morris makes it, he makes it and he'll be happy. He'll also be a punchline/negative example for a long time. (Sam Miller)
2012-01-12 13:00:00 (link to chat)Which pitchers stand out as personal favorites that never panned out like you thought they would?
(PepeShady from St Paul)
Bret Saberhagen. Kevin Appier. I was sure both of them would be Hall of Famers. Though if Jack Morris gets in, I may start pushing their candidacies a little harder. Apparently you never know. They can get back on the ballot, right?

More recently, I had high hopes for Brett Anderson. I guess he may yet fulfill those. Erik Bedard...I sense a theme. I've been a big Gavin Floyd fan for a while, and though he's been good, he's never broken through to great. On a much lower tier, Chad Gaudin. (Mike Fast)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)If Jack Morris is elected based on the "pitching to the score" and "he was an ace" and "all the post-season fireworks" argument(s), doesn't that essentially seal the candidacies of Bernie Williams and Posada along the same lines of thought?
(BL from Bozeman, MT)
No, because intellectual consistency isn't one of the more reliable traits among Hall of Fame voters. (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)In your heart of hearts...is the Jack Morris bashing warranted or not? Also...the Jay-stache is remarkable.
(Jesus Melendez from Hall of Very Good)
The strength of the Morris bashing is a reaction to the obstinacy of the old-school, you-had-to-see-him, just-wins-baby, oh-yeah-and-opening-day-starts-though-we've-never-considered-those-before voters.

Thanks for the kind words on the mustache! (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)It is nice here.
(Envious Mustache from Elysian Fields)
And the winner is... Barry Larkin with 86.4 percent of the vote, the only player elected this year as expected. Some big surprises, good and bad, among the next wave. Jack Morris at 66.7 percent has put himself in good position to get over the top despite the crowd, Jeff Bagwell at 56.0 percent made a solid advance in the face of an odious whisper campaign, Lee Smith got to 50.6 percent, Tim Raines is very close to that mark at 48.7 percent, and even Alan Trammell posted a solid gain at 36.8 percent. Hell, Bernie Williams got 9.6 percent and stays on the ballot after all. (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)So I guess Jack Morris is bordering on inevitable. That's higher than anyone that hasn't been enshrined has ever gone in the vote, right?
(Mike from Back to Work)
I'll have a better answer for tomorrow's column but yes, right now he suddenly - shockingly, even - looks inevitable. (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2011-05-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Nice start for A.J. - HBP on an 0-2 count and a wild pickoff throw to 1st to get Sizemore to 3rd. April is over ...
(goodwine10 from New York, NY)
These things happen. What's more interesting to me is that for all the supposed wonderfulness of Burnett's April, his ERA was only about league average... YES just flashed the names Kirk Gibson, Jack Morris, Alan Trammell, and Lou Whitaker. At least one of those guys should be in the Hall of Fame, and it's not Morris. (Steven Goldman)
2011-01-12 13:00:00 (link to chat)Steven, As our thoughts are with those lost in the Tuscon assassination (including Dallas Green's granddaughter), do you have any thoughts on where we as a society go from here?
(Eurbiel Durazo from America)
A tough question to answer in a chat, or for that matter in a 500-page dissertation. I'm cynical enough to believe that our society has been so debauched that we don't go anywhere that we weren't headed before Saturday. As I wrote over at the PB (http://bit.ly/hDfOt2), we tend to frame all of our disagreements in binary terms-my rights OR yours, like it's a Hall of Fame debate. Either Jack Morris is in the Hall of Fame or he's not, either I get my way or you get yours, and there is no middle ground. When you do that, a republic stops dead in the water, because compromise is lost. The whole idea is that it's my rights AND yours, and I give a little and you give a little and we have a better society as a result. We've forgotten that, and as a result, we have that kind of inflammatory rhetoric that is fun for sane people to watch on TV or listen to on the radio but is catnip for deranged f--kheads like that guy in Arizona. (Steven Goldman)
2011-01-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)I always thought Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker are given a poor shake. If they had played together in New York all those years, They'd be In! Your thoughts?
(Avenger Dad from Jenny Lind, Ca)
There's no doubt that east coast media exposure would have helped that duo — you could put them in Philadelphia or Boston and probably still see a significant bump.

What kills me is that there are voters who will eagerly check the box next to Jack Morris' name without recognizing that he had outstanding run support and defensive support, and that Trammell and Whitaker were a big part of that for his entire career as a Tiger. Yet those voters let Whitaker slip off the ballot after a single vote, and still won't give Trammell the time of day. (Jay Jaffe)
2011-01-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Jay love your work. It's helps younger guys like me (23) put players into a HOF perspective. Anyways, I can't rememeber where you stand on the Jack Morris stuff. Morris for the HOF is pure sillyness, right?
(Justin from Chicago)
I'm firmly against the election of Morris (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=12611), which isn't to say that he didn't have some great seasons and some truly transcendent moments. I watched his 1984 no-hitter and his 1991 World Series Game Seven start and both still give me goosebumps thinking about. But beyond the ever-growing legend of that latter game, he just wasn't good enough at preventing runs to merit inclusion. (Jay Jaffe)
2011-01-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)I can see the writing on the wall already. The next Jack Morris will be Andy Pettitte. Good career inflated by mythmaking. Do you agree? Secondly, so many myth-making pitchers coming up, some worthy of Hall anyway, like Smoltz and Schilling, but do you see all of these "big game" pitchers hurting Mussina's vote totals?
(tommybones from brooklyn)
Morris and Pettitte: agreed, to at least some extent. Both have had the benefit of robust offensive support and some great postseason performances, with their failures in the latter arena swept to the side. Pettitte will have the burden of his HGH connections to contend with as well. Even divorced from that, I don't think he's got the numbers. See http://www.pinstripedbible.com/2010/10/19/is-dandy-andy-cooperstown-material/ for my latest take.

As for Smoltz, he's got the Eckersley precedent of a hybrid starter/closer career. Schilling will have a whole lot of legend and some legitimately great postseason performance to buoy numbers that are superceded by those of Mussina. It will be interesting to see how that plays out - I'm not sure I can guess right now, except that neither of them will go in on the first ballot. (Jay Jaffe)
2011-01-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)If Jack Morris doesn't pitch Game 7 in 1991, is he even on the ballot at this point?
(RMR from Chicago)
Well, Tommy John and Jim Kaat lasted 15 years with just shy of 300 wins, and other than Blyleven, Morris has the highest win total of anyone who's been on the ballot in years, so yes, I think Morris would still be on the ballot, albeit with well below 50 percent of the vote. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-06-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Jay, Jack Morris isn't actually going to get elected to the Hall of Fame one of these years, is he? The Legend of the Guy Who Pitched to the Score is even more specious than the Legend of the Feared Hitter. The wave of great pitchers reaching eligibility in the next few years will be sufficient to hold off his charge, right?
(David from CT)
Morris has been above 40 percent on three of the past four BBWAA ballots, and if you look at where Bert Blyleven was after a decade on the ballot, Black Jack is only 3.7 percent behind at 44.0 percent. That said, Byleven got a real push from the grassroots internet supporters, of which I'm a card-carrying member, and gained another 25+ percent. Morris doesn't seem likely to get that anytime soon. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-06-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)By happy coincidence, I daydreamed a question for you not more than a day ago, and here you are. Not that I'm trying to sneak in the backdoor, but do consistent players get any sort of boost in the public's estimation of their HoF chances, and should they? I think here of a Jack Morris. Even though his heights were more very good than HoF, his workmanlike consistency--on top of being relatable and making him seem like a good guy--kept Tigers fans from a lot of crappy starts from a more up and down pitcher. I wonder if consistency (if it could be defined) would ever end up having a predictive value on eventual election. Thanks for suffering a long question, Jay.
(Jim Clancy from Exhibition Stadium)
Consistency is pretty difficult to quantify, except perhaps in the way it enables players to accumulate the benchmark stats that most of the public regards as constituting "a good season." I think of Steve Garvey rapping out his 200 hits, 100 RBI and .300 batting average every year and how highly esteemed he was in his day, and yet how far his star has fallen in light of a more modern statistical reckoning. But then I also think of guys like Blyleven and Don Sutton who were pretty consistent on some levels but didn't rack up the 20-win seasons that some of their peers did, and aren't held on the same level as them even if they may have been more valuable.

In the end I suspect peak value holds more sway on the public's estimation of a potential HoFer, because people tend to remember the high points, the outliers, the things that break pattern rather than the pattern itself. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-05-11 16:30:00 (link to chat)How many more "Halladay like" seasons does Halladay need before he's a lock for the Hall Of Fame?
(Susan from New York)
That's more of a Jay Jaffe question than a question for me, but I see he's just shy of 50 career WARP. I would think that's low, but I would also think Jack Morris' total is low. My best cop-out answer would be to say that if Halladay stays good enough that the Phillies pick up his 2014 option at $20 mill, he's probably getting close. (Matt Swartz)
2010-05-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is it fair to say AJ Burnett's career has been a slight disappointment? I assume most people thought he would have at least 1 Cy Young award by now and/or been the staff ace of a team.
(Zooey from LA)
For the stuff he has, yes, I think you can say he's been a disappointment. Still had a very good career, but he's rarely consistent with his greatness.

Maybe he'll win a few big World Series games before this thing is over though, and then we can see about putting him in the Hall of Fame next to Jack Morris because he pitched to the score. (Marc Normandin)
2010-01-12 18:30:00 (link to chat)Do you think Jack Morris will make it into the HOF? He seems to be making a Jim rice like push with his vote totals
(mafrth77 from Boston)
Given his recent push I can certainly foresee him getting in, but he will run out of years eventually and there are some very solid classes coming up with players that may take away from his vote totals. If I had to bet, though, yeah, he'll get in. (Eric Seidman)
2010-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)Jay, I was surprised to see how well Kevin Appier stacks up against Jack Morris in your article today (granted, over a shorter period). How hard would the heads of people like Shaughnessy explode if you you tried to convince them that KEVIN APPIER was a more deserving candidate than Jack Morris?
(MSTI from NYC)
I know it's not exactly what you asked but yes, I would be happy to see Shaughnessy's head explode. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)I'd call this good news for Bert. I was worried he'd stagnate around 62%. do you have the % of the vote for Edgar, Raines and Barry? They don't have it on espn.com. Thanks.
(collins from greenville nc)
539 ballots, five blanks, Andre Dawson 420 (77.9%), Bert Blyleven 400 (74.2%), Roberto Alomar 397 (73.7%), Jack Morris 282 (52.3%), Barry Larkin 278 (51.6%), Lee Smith 255 (47.3%), Edgar Martinez 195 (36.2%), Tim Raines 164 (30.4%), Mark McGwire 128 (23.7%), Alan Trammell 121 (22.4%), Fred McGriff 116 (21.5%), Don Mattingly 87 (16.1%), Dave Parker 82 (15.2%), Dale Murphy 63 (11.7%), Harold Baines 33 (6.1%), Andres Galarraga 22 (4.1%), Robin Ventura 7 (1.3%), Ellis Burks 2 (0.4%), Eric Karros 2 (0.4%), Kevin Appier 1 (0.2%), Pat Hentgen 1 (0.2%), David Segui 1 (0.2%), Mike Jackson 0, Ray Lankford 0, Shane Reynolds 0, Todd Zeile 0.

Segui gets his vote. Baines remains on life support thanks to the persistence of a stubborn few. Karros receives more votes than he had All-Star appearances. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)With Larkin getting just over 50% on his first ballot, is he a lock to get in eventually? What's the over/under on how many years? Thanks.
(KerryFam4 from Atlanta, GA)
Aside from guys currently on the ballot, everybody who's gotten 50% of the vote from the writers has gone in eventually except for Gil Hodges. Which thus bodes well not only for Larkin but also Jack Morris, who gained about 8 percent this year - a big jump. Without thinking too hard about the coming attractions on the ballot, I'd guess Larkin is in within five or six years. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-06-03 15:00:00 (link to chat)Will Jamie Moyer even get close to the hall of fame? I wouldn't think so but the idea has gotten some favorable attention since he hit 250 wins.
(kevin from boston)
I don't think so, not if a 250+ winner with additional postseason heroics like Jack Morris can't get above 50% of the vote (and he shouldn't, as you'll see if you read my JAWS articles). Pitcher wins ain't all that they're cracked up to be anyway, and the fact that Moyer has no Cys and just one All-Star appearance pretty much consigns him to the human interest section of the voting. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-02-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Christina, great work over the offseason, as always. My question is about roster construction, and specifically the hitter/pitcher divide. It seems like it was just yesterday that we were mocking the Rockies and/or Don Baylor for taking 12 pitchers, but at least it was mildly defensible on the grounds that they needed extra arms to throw in Coors Field. Now we're at a point where almost everyone is at a 13/12 divide. What the heck happened, and what do you think are the chances of some squad going back to 15/10 simply by employing 2 good long men in the pen at all times?
(ElAngelo from New York, NY)
Baylor's mistake was that he made that choice for a post-season roster. While I would like to see more teams invest the roster space in observing one of Earl Weaver's rules and put their young starters in long relief roles, and thereby save themselves multiple spots sunk on multiple situational playthings in the pen, you could also save roster space by effectively committing to a four-man rotation that exploits the fact that we're in a world that doesn't have doubleheaders and a schedule that features plenty of off-days to reduce the fifth slot to a sometime thing. That might mean shorter starts for the front four, and it might not, but I think we're at a point where the industry has probably overcorrected, costing us the next Jack Morris or Tom Seaver.

You could also expand your roster by not resorting to Eck-style closer usage patterns--make the money pitcher for the endgame something more than a sundae's cherry, and you'll get more quality innings. Condition them to be Eck-style closers, and you're investing a roster spot on a single-purpose single-inning reliever, forcing you to commit to 11 at the outset, and making 12 seems plausible.

Now, to be fair to major league managers, managing pitching staffs involves anticipating a lot of different scenarios, not all of them happy, and committing resources in the form of those roster spots. But it can also mean not giving lineups the same depth of consideration, because you know you'll have nine guys out there, and beyond someone who can play the corners, someone who can play the outfield, and someone who can catch, you figure you're covered. It's not the way I look at the problem of in-game tactics or in-season operations, but I was reading Earl Weaver's books at an impressionable age. (Christina Kahrl)
2008-01-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Overrated marginal HOFers - Schilling.
(NC from West Coast)
Hardly. His regular-season work puts him in the gray area, admittedly at the low end. Then you have to consider the postseason, and to some extent, the narrative. Those things push him over the top. Postseason matters in a Hall of Fame discussion.

What the Jack Morris people don't get is that those of us who don't think he's qualified *do* consider Game 7 and his postseason record as part of his case. The problem is that even with those things, it's still not enough. His overall postseason record is good, just not fantastic.

I would also strongly argue that the people who don't think he's qualified give more credence to Morris' postseason work than Morris' supporters do to the mass quantities of evidence that his win totals were a function of durability and teammates, not special skills.

Anyway, Schilling will make the Hall, and deserve it. (Joe Sheehan)
2008-01-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)So being able to pitch to the score gets me no respect?
(Jack_Morris from Candyland)
I assume this is someone just asking me to run the link.
Jack Morris didn't have any ability to prevent runs based on the score of the game:

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=1815 (Joe Sheehan)
2008-01-08 14:00:00 (link to chat)my prediction: Goose in. Rice misses by an extremely small margin. Much, much bleating commences over the voters who submitted blanks to protest roids users, thus depriving the "deserving" pre-roids slugger.
(TomH from Lexington Park MD)
The Goose is Loose! He gets 85.8 percent, and he's the only one who gets in on this ballot.

Rice falls just shy at 72.2 percent, setting him up for a 15th-year push.

Raines 24.3 percent. Oh is that ugly.

Player Total Votes Percentage Rich Gossage 466 85.8% Jim Rice 392 72.2% Andre Dawson 358 65.9% Bert Blyleven 336 61.9% Lee Smith 235 43.3% Jack Morris 233 42.9% Tommy John 158 29.1% Tim Raines 132 24.3% Mark McGwire 128 23.6% Alan Trammell 99 18.2% Dave Concepcion 88 16.2% Don Mattingly 86 15.8% Dave Parker 82 15.1% Dale Murphy 75 13.8% Harold Baines 28 5.2% Rod Beck 2 0.4% Travis Fryman 2 0.4% Robb Nen 2 0.4% Shawon Dunston 1 0.2% Chuck Finley 1 0.2% David Justice 1 0.2% Chuck Knoblauch 1 0.2% Todd Stottlemyre 1 0.2%
Jose Rijo 0 0% Brady Anderson 0 0% (Jay Jaffe)


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