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Steven Goldman 

Steven Goldman

The Editor in Chief of Baseball Prospectus, Steven Goldman has been with BP since 2003, writing the "You Could Look It Up" column which ties baseball history into current events, and now "The BP Broadside," a current events column. As an editor, Steven has supervised the creation of the BP books "Mind Game" and "It Ain't Over," as well as the last six editions of the New York Times bestselling Baseball Prospectus annual. As a solo author, he wrote Forging Genius about the professional education of Casey Stengel. He also writes the Pinstriped Bible for the YES Network and releases original songs at Casual Observer Music. He lives in New Jersey with his wife, two children, and a pair of cats named after famous Republicans.

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01-03

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: The Nose Knows
by
Steven Goldman

11-20

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Gift of Kuhn
by
Steven Goldman

09-14

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The BP Wayback Machine: The Showalter Gambit
by
Steven Goldman

07-27

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: What is a Deadline Trade Worth?, Part 1
by
Steven Goldman

03-23

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: Jon Lester, Meet Mel Parnell
by
Steven Goldman

03-18

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0

BP Beta Blog: Get a Free Copy of BP's Extra Innings
by
Steven Goldman

03-02

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69

The BP Broadside: The Final Broadside
by
Steven Goldman

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-28

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28

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part One
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-27

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11

The BP Broadside: Zimmerman, Rendon, and the Nagging Itch to Scratch a McQuinn
by
Steven Goldman

02-24

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98

The BP Broadside: Say It Ain't So, Braun!
by
Steven Goldman

02-24

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Spring Training, What's it Good For?
by
Steven Goldman

02-22

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27

The BP Broadside: Manny Ramirez Through the Wrong End of the Telescope
by
Steven Goldman

02-17

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6

The BP Broadside: The Kid's Biggest Moment
by
Steven Goldman

02-16

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8

The BP Broadside: Fernandomania and Linsanity
by
Steven Goldman

02-10

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21

The BP Broadside: The Latino
by
Steven Goldman

02-08

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19

The BP Broadside: Pardon Me, Sir, But Have You Ever Even TALKED To A Female Baseball Fan?
by
Steven Goldman

02-06

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7

The BP Broadside: The Vanishing American League Pinch-Hitter
by
Steven Goldman

02-03

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74

The BP Broadside: Josh Hamilton and His Persecutors
by
Steven Goldman

02-01

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6

The BP Broadside: My Seven Days of Nervous Baseball and Other Stories
by
Steven Goldman

01-30

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15

Baseball Prospectus Book News: Extra Innings: More Baseball Between the Numbers Available for Pre-Order
by
Steven Goldman

01-30

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20

The BP Broadside: Jorge Posada and the Third-String Yankees
by
Steven Goldman

01-27

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7

The BP Broadside: Who Cares if the Tigers Got Fat?
by
Steven Goldman

01-17

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3

The BP Broadside: 1987: The Silver Jubilee, Part I
by
Steven Goldman

01-09

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54

State of the Prospectus
by
Steven Goldman

12-27

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7

The BP Broadside: The Rudy Pemberton Project Goes to Baltimore
by
Steven Goldman

12-24

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3

From the Editor's Desk: We Like the Holidays So Much, We're Taking an Extra Day
by
Steven Goldman

12-20

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12

The BP Broadside: Jersey Scrooge to Darvish: Drop Dead
by
Steven Goldman

12-14

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4

The BP Broadside: Cottleston Pirates
by
Steven Goldman

12-09

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18

The BP Broadside: The Best First Baseman in Angels History
by
Steven Goldman

12-07

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3

BP Unfiltered: Winter Meetings Dispatch: It's Like a Dentist said Rinse to 10,000 People at Once
by
Steven Goldman

12-07

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24

BP Unfiltered: Winter Meetings Dispatch: The Social Ramble Ain't Restful, with Jose Reyes, Albert Pujols, Huston Street
by
Steven Goldman

12-06

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5

BP Unfiltered: Winter Meetings Dispatch, with Some Santos Trade Thoughts
by
Steven Goldman

12-06

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22

The BP Broadside: The Singular Love of Manny Ramirez
by
Steven Goldman

12-05

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7

BP Unfiltered: Wallflower at the Prom
by
Steven Goldman

11-30

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13

The BP Broadside: Bobby No Valentine for Pitchers
by
Steven Goldman

11-11

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4

The BP Broadside: The Ramos and Rhem Kidnappings
by
Steven Goldman

11-08

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25

The BP Broadside: Tumbling in the Twin Cities
by
Steven Goldman

11-04

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25

The BP Broadside: Exorcising the Ghost of Leo
by
Steven Goldman

10-31

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6

The BP Broadside: Tony LaRussa and the Hall of Fame Screw
by
Steven Goldman

10-29

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3

BP Unfiltered: BP Game 7 Roundtable HERE
by
Steven Goldman

10-24

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BP Unfiltered: World Series Game 5 Roundtable HERE
by
Steven Goldman

10-22

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: Every Team Has a Special GM, Except the Cubs
by
Steven Goldman

10-21

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62

The BP Broadside: In Defense of Tony LaRussa
by
Steven Goldman

10-20

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BP Unfiltered: BP World Series Game 2 Roundtable HERE
by
Steven Goldman

10-14

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BP Unfiltered: NLCS Game 4 Roundtable HERE
by
Steven Goldman

10-12

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BP Unfiltered: ALCS G3 Roundtable with BP HERE
by
Steven Goldman

10-10

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10

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Philadelphia Phillies
by
Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

10-10

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1

BP Unfiltered: Live-Chat the Playoffs With Us on Tuesday and Thursday (Updated)
by
Steven Goldman

10-07

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22

The BP Broadside: The ALDS Goat Remains Masked and Anonymous
by
Steven Goldman

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Chatchatchatchat!

Good morning, campers. In response to several reader inquiries, we have scheduled two in-game chats for upcoming championship series games. First up, we'll be doin' the Fister on Tuesday evening at 8:05 with Jay Jaffe, R.J. Anderson, Sam Miller, Jeff Euston, and more, including myself (which, I hope, is not too much of a disincentive). Thursday will include Kevin Goldstein, Larry Granillo, and more. That night we will be joshin' and analyzin' our way through the Brewers, the Cardinals, and the gauche Lohse.

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Alex Rodriguez was set up to fail... But by who?

In his second postseason as a starter, the 1952 World Series, Brooklyn first baseman Gil Hodges had a miserable time. In seven games he went 0-for-21 with five walks and one RBI. The Dodgers lost to the Yankees in seven games, and Hodges was the official goat. Hodges played in another four World Series and he never had another bad one, hitting .337 with four home runs in 26 games, yet he never did stop hearing about what happened in ’52, and that terrible series may have helped keep him out of the Hall of Fame.

There have been other goats, like Fred Snodgrass in 1912, Hack Wilson in 1929, Ernie Lombardi—very unfairly—in 1939 (ever since it has been argued whether Charlie Keller kicked him in the head or in the groin, as if one or the other was somehow preferable), Mickey Owen in 1941, Dave Winfield in 1981, Bill Buckner in 1986—and perhaps Alex Rodriguez in the 2011 American League Divisional Series between the Yankees and the Tigers.

I think about the “Snodgrass Muff” a lot because, like “Merkle’s Boner,” it’s a good example of how unfair life can be. “Snow” supposedly cost the Giants the 1912 World Series against the Red Sox—the last World Series the Sox ever won, you’d think, from the way folks are carrying on this year—but he was only a contributor. The two teams were playing the eighth game of a seven-game series, a previous game having ended in a tie, at Fenway Park. It was the bottom of the 10th inning. The Giants had just gone up 2-1 in the top of the frame by scoring an impossible run against Smoky Joe Wood, on in relief. Christy Mathewson was still in for the Giants.

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September 29, 2011 2:33 pm

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Boston Red Sox

11

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

A stench will linger from Boston's collapse, but the Sox will be elite again in 2012

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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September 26, 2011 5:00 am

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Cleveland Indians

13

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

The Indians rolled the dice on Ubaldo Jimenez and must now fill holes for 2012.

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski, and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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We're on early!

With no late game tonight, Kevin Goldstein, Mike Ferrin, and I will be on early and going long. MLB Roundtrip with Baseball Prospectus begins at 8PM EST and will take you through midnight. Give us a call at 866-652-6696 or drop us a note here. We have many surprises in store, so put on your ears and listen in.

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September 23, 2011 5:00 am

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Los Angeles Dodgers

16

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

The team's problems might linger as long as Frank McCourt does

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski, and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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September 23, 2011 4:43 am

The BP Broadside: In Which the Cardinals Suffer an Unlikely Loss

15

Steven Goldman

While LaRussa slept.

If insurance companies covered baseball leads, the Cardinals’ carrier would surely have deemed Thursday’s loss to the Mets an act of God. After all, the LaRussians carried a 6-2 lead into the ninth inning only to see the Mets score six runs against their closer. As They Might Be Giants sang in, “She’s An Angel,” “These things happen to other people; they don’t happen at all, in fact.”

That’s almost literally true—they don’t happen at all. You know how given a three-run lead in the ninth inning, a closer—any closer—will convert about 96 percent of the time? Give a team a four-run lead in the visitor’s ninth and they’re going to convert about 100 percent of the time. The winning percentage of teams in that situation over the last 50-plus years is .987. It is very, very hard to blow a lead like that, and yet the Cardinals, the team of supposedly expert reliever usage manipulated by the Bobby Fischer of Bullpens, managed to do so. As they say, that’s why they play the games.  

Of course, most teams with a four-run lead don’t have Jason Motte coming into the game and putting on a performance that couldn’t have been worse had it been paid for by Arnold Rothstein. Motte didn’t allow a hit to the Mets, but he walked leadoff man Willie Harris, saw Nick Evans reach first base on a Rafael Furcal error that aborted a potential double play, and walked Jason Pridie. The bases loaded, Motte capped a memorable afternoon by walking pinch-hitter Justin Turner to force in a run. At that point, quick-draw LaRussa, who had not been as quick as one might have expected in this series, finally brought the hook, but neither Fernando Salas nor Marc Rzepcynski could stem the tide that had now been unleashed. The flood was exacerbated by some shaky defense from the Cardinals, not only Furcal’s error but also bad positioning on the part of left fielder Shane Robinson, who had come into the game for Allen Craig and was caught playing shallow on a drive to left field by Ruben Tejada that went for a double and tied the game.

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September 20, 2011 10:43 pm

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Cincinnati Reds

29

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

They led the National League in runs, but had too many question marks to capitalize.

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski, and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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Despite the barkers, the colored balloons, and Mariano Rivera, there is no Closer Mountain.

As Mariano Rivera tied and then broke Trevor Hoffman’s record for career saves, the YES Network’s Michael Kay kept referring to Rivera being “alone atop the mountain of closers.” Sometimes he said “alone atop the mountain of closers with Trevor Hoffman,” which doesn’t make much sense, because how can you be alone with somebody except in literary depictions of alienated romance, presumably not what Kay was talking about? In any case, Closer Mountain is more aptly described as a pimple, because most closers last about as long as the typical skin blemish and are about as memorable no matter how many saves they have. Compared to Rivera (and Hoffman as well), they are no more than transients traveling between obscurity and obscurity.

Rivera has been the Yankees’ closer since 1997. In that time, he has had eight seasons of 40 or more saves. You well know that saves are a vastly overrated statistic due to the way they seem to indicate leverage but really don’t, so don’t take that as a measure of quality, but rather of the fact that someone felt he was worth running out there with a lead—with the exception of the occasional Joe Borowski ’07, you don’t get a chance to pile up that many saves while pitching poorly.

The saves are the secondary by-product of the two elements of Rivera’s game that make him so valuable: First, he’s simply an exceptionally good pitcher. His current 2.22 ERA ranks ninth all time, 1,200 innings and up division. Literally everyone above him pitched in the Deadball era. The closest pitcher who was primarily a reliever is the Hall of Famer Hoyt Wilhelm, who had a 2.52 ERA overall and 2.49 in 1872 1/3 innings as a reliever, just about all of which was compiled in a less challenging run environment than the steroidal 1990s and 2000s.

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Posting early for increased conversation pleasure!

It's Sunday, and that means tonight Kevin Goldstein, Mike Ferrin, and myself will be on SiriusXM for three hours of baseball talk and escalating conversational violence. IAs always, you can tune in beginning tonight at 11 PM on SiriusXM's MLB Network Radio (Sirius 209/XM 89), as well as SiriusXM.com if the Sunday night game goes long. You can also leave your comments, questions, and suggested topics here before or during the show and we'll respond on the air. You can also call in and join the coversation at 866-652-6696. Looking forward to hearing from you.

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September 16, 2011 11:23 am

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Kansas City Royals

16

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

The Royals are loaded with young talent, but they're still experiencing growing pains

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the League Division Series, League Championship Series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski, and Kevin Goldstein's farm system overview.

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September 16, 2011 9:00 am

The BP Broadside: You Don't Need a Prince, Just a Few Paupers

19

Steven Goldman

Prince Fielder says he's leaving, but with the rest of their core intact the team should continue to contend.

I’m looking for Prince Fielder on our WARP leader list and I can’t find him. Oh yes, there he is, down at number 29. Hey, no shame in being the 29th-most valuable player in the majors—there are roughly 890 players who aren’t having seasons as good as you are. Fielder is also the fifth-ranked first baseman behind Joey Votto, Albert Pujols, Adrian Gonzalez, and Miguel Cabrera. This is an exalted place to be, but does it make you irreplaceable?

On Wednesday, Fielder acknowledged that his stay with the Brewers is probably almost at its end: “Being real about it, it is probably the last year.” In their hearts, Brewers fans already knew this to be the case, but no doubt some have been holding out hope that a competitive offer and a tug on the old heartstrings would keep Fielder in Wisconsin. That seems unlikely to happen, but it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

The Brewers have an $84 million payroll this year, ranking 16th in the majors. Assuming that Fielder is going to receive a payday somewhere in the range of the $20 million presently paid to Ryan Howard, Miguel Cabrera, and Mark Teixeira (who leads first basemen with $23 million), he is going to consume a chunk of the team’s payroll as disproportionately large as his own body. It is the rare first baseman who is actually worth that kind of distortion, and Fielder is not one of them.

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