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Russell A. Carleton 

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08-23

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2

Baseball Therapy: If I Had A Million Dollars
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-16

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29

Baseball Therapy: Rage Over Roids
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-09

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1

Baseball Therapy: Learning A New Position Is Free
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-03

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4

Baseball Therapy: What Would 7-Inning Baseball Look Like?
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-26

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8

Baseball Therapy: Growing Zobrists
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-19

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4

Baseball Therapy: The Pink Elephant Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-06

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7

Baseball Therapy: ...Although I Have No Idea How We'd Measure That
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-28

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2

Baseball Therapy: Dollhouses and Sandboxes
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-23

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8

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-22

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-21

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4

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-20

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

05-31

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3

Baseball Therapy: The Knee
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-24

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4

Baseball Therapy: Framing the At-Bat
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-17

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5

Prospectus Feature: The Only Rule Is You Have To Answer My Questions
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-11

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8

Baseball Therapy: The Even Slightly More Convincing Argument Against the Shift
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-03

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10

Baseball Therapy: The Pretty Good Case That the Shift Doesn't Work
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-27

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7

Baseball Therapy: Can Teams Come Back From a Comeback?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-19

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17

Baseball Therapy: The One About Exit Velocity
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-12

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5

Baseball Therapy: Somebody Is Finally Trying to Kill the Traditional Closer Role
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-07

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1

Baseball Therapy: Go Ahead, Call It a Comeback
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-05

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8

Baseball Therapy: Someone's Not Paying Attention
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-29

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7

Baseball Therapy: It Worked Last Time
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-22

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4

Baseball Therapy: Are You Cultured?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-15

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8

Baseball Therapy: Bringing Down The House
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-08

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1

Baseball Therapy: Should Someone Save Salvy?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-01

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19

Baseball Therapy: Let's Talk About Tax Policy
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-23

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13

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Times Through The Order Penalty?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-16

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7

Baseball Therapy: Do Bad PECOTA Projections Make Teams Mad?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-09

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13

Baseball Therapy: The Crack in the Defensive Spectrum
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-02

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20

Baseball Therapy: The Dark Side of Pitch Framing?
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: It's Nice to Have Options
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-19

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2

Baseball Therapy: Let's Figure Out What a Scouting Department's Entire Product is Worth
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-12

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7

Baseball Therapy: Put Russell In the Hall of Fame
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-05

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12

Baseball Therapy: Now With 50 Percent Less Math
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-31

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2

Best of BP 2015: Why Not Make the Hole Square?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-22

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8

Baseball Therapy: We Can Be Heroes?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-16

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17

Baseball Therapy: Have We Been Underpricing Relievers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-08

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6

Baseball Therapy: Fiddlesticks, Yeah!
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-01

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5

Baseball Therapy: The Neuropsychology of Bad Managing
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-24

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7

Baseball Therapy: The Kimbrel Gambit
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-19

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6

Baseball Therapy: What Should the QO Number Be?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-10

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3

Baseball Therapy: I Want to Write About Player Development
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-03

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8

Baseball Therapy: How Much the DH Rule Matters
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-28

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8

Baseball Therapy: And on the Fifth Day He Rested
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-20

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5

Baseball Therapy: Say You'll Remember Me
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-13

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14

Baseball Therapy: Do We Still Need Divisions?
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-06

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9

Baseball Therapy: My Bad Baseball Predictions
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-29

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6

Baseball Therapy: Let Him Pitch!
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-23

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Going Streaking
by
Russell A. Carleton

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What's the best way to spend money, given what we know right this minute?

A few years ago, I had a conversation with my brother. We were talking about (surprise!) baseball, but then his finance degree started talking. He pointed out to me that baseball is actually a really bad business model to be trapped in. The majority of your costs are fixed. You will be paying them, no matter what. Unlike the NFL, MLB contracts are largely guaranteed, so once a team signs a big expensive free agent, they are on the hook for paying him, sometimes on the hook several years into the future. On the other side, a lot of the revenue sources that teams have traditionally counted on (attendance, concessions, merchandise)—items that even in the age of huge TV contracts and regional sports networks being big feeders of the bottom line are still important—are variable. Fans usually come out to support a winner and a lot of times it’s hard to know how good you’ll be in three years. Will there be enough revenue to cover the cost of that fancy new second baseman? Teams aren’t completely operating in the dark when it comes to budgeting, but unlike a lot of other industries where if demand slows down, you can simply slow down production (and save money that way), baseball doesn’t let you do that.

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One of the greatest high schoolers ever turned into one of the greatest major leaguers ever. How much credit could PEDs even *theoretically* deserve?

We live in a time that will likely be remembered by some—unofficially, of course—as the Steroid Era in baseball. Beginning in the 1990s when offensive production and reported uses of steroids, some later confirmed, went way up. With the publishing of the Mitchell Report in 2007, which detailed oodles of allegations against players that they used performance enhancing drugs, including anabolic steroids. Even now, 20ish (gulp) years removed from those halcyon days when flannel was a thing, they’re apparently still around. We still see players testing positive for the use of PEDs, even though everyone knows that there’s a testing program in place.

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Searching for a cost to multi-positional experimentation.

I’m about to commit a cardinal sin of writing. I’m going to spend the first part of this article telling you all the reasons why you shouldn’t believe the second part of this article. I’m going to lay out a pretty good case (if I do say so myself) that I’m an idiot and that I shouldn’t be allowed anywhere near a database. And then I’m going to do it anyway.

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A seemingly simple solution would have dramatic unforeseen consequences? Well, I'll be.

There are apparently certain things in life that you don’t want to last for more than four hours. They might be fun for the first half-hour, but after a while it just gets dangerous for your health and you should call a doctor. Of course, I’m talking about baseball games, and for the past few years, MLB has talked about ways in which they could make the game go a little bit faster and wrap up in a shorter amount of time.

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If you want a bunch of Zobrists, it helps to plant them early. Are teams doing it?

We live in an era of short benches. Recently, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred made news when he admitted that the league office has had discussions about new restrictions for teams around how they can use relievers (and how many). There’s nothing imminent, but Manfred cited the dominance of relievers in recent years and hinted that the move would bring a little offensive spark back into the game. Plus, we all know the complaints about innings where a team uses four pitchers. Because they have eight relievers on the roster.

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Do different looks give hitters fits? You won't BELIEVE the answer. (You probably will.)

Now pitching for the Milwaukee Brewers. Number 21. Jeremy Jeffress.

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On finding answers in unanswerable questions.

Let’s think outside the box. You know. “The box.” The box that every single motivational speaker and business consultant and hack writer tells you that you need to think outside of, before reaching for one of the acceptable 10 examples of out-of-the-box thinking. (Did you know that Post-It notes were created by accident? All because someone had the idea to think outside of the box!) “The box” is now—ironically enough—a tired metaphor for thinking in ways that aren’t creative. I’m always amused by the fact that people call for “outside the box” thinking, and then never talk about how that’s to be accomplished. The problem is that we are all trapped inside a mime’s box. How do you step outside a box that neither you nor anyone else can actually see?

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What can Starting Lineup figurines and Abraham Lincoln teach us about baseball research?

Somewhere at my parents’ house, there’s a Starting Lineup figurine of Jose Canseco, depicting him during his Bash Brothers days with the Oakland A’s. I got it for Christmas one year back in the days when Jose Canseco was my favorite player. I would have been nine or ten at the time and he was ... let’s just say the words “Jose Canseco” evoked a different image back in the late 80s/early 90s than they do now. Canseco had won the 1986 Rookie of the Year award at 21 and the 1988 MVP at 23, hitting 40 home runs and stealing 40 bases in the same year. At the time, Canseco seemed like the guy we would all look back on some day and tell our kids that we saw him play.

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Are front offices nurturing a garden where great new ideas can sprout?

This is the last in a four-part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from. Part 2 looked at the cost of internships. Part 3 considered the implications of the Ivy League's takeover of front offices.

This is the final installment in a series that has examined the major-league front office. If big-league players are actually just guys in funny pajamas, then the front office workers are just (mostly) guys in funny polo shirts. But who are the people wearing those polo shirts (and how can I become one)? We’ve spent the past few articles looking at that question—in BP style—using a data-driven approach.

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The path to a front office job starts in the college application process.

This is the third in a four-part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from. Part 2 looked at the cost of internships.

Major League Baseball wants more diversity in its 30 front offices, and in the main league office as well. The league has taken steps to address the issue, including hiring former Pittsburgh Pirates Director of Baseball Personnel Tyrone Brooks this winter to be the Senior Director of its Front Office and Field Staff Diversity Pipeline Program.

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The path to a career in baseball runs increasingly through one very expensive toll booth.

This is the second in a four part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from.

Do you love baseball and have a good understanding of analytics? More importantly, are you independently wealthy? Congratulations, you can afford to be an intern with a baseball team and not rack up debt!

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The first in a four-part series about the path to working in a major-league team's front office.

The Front Office is at once a mythical place where magical things happen and a very boring office. It’s a place where besuited heroes tame dragons and collect unicorns that will decide the fate of your favorite team, and also a place where a small group of guys (and yes, most of them are men—we’ll talk about that) make boring administrative decisions about the logistics of running something that is one part Broadway show, one part athletic competition, and one part actual business.

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