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Russell A. Carleton 

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07-26

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8

Baseball Therapy: Growing Zobrists
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-19

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4

Baseball Therapy: The Pink Elephant Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-06

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7

Baseball Therapy: ...Although I Have No Idea How We'd Measure That
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-28

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2

Baseball Therapy: Dollhouses and Sandboxes
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-23

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8

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-22

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-21

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4

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-20

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

05-31

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3

Baseball Therapy: The Knee
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-24

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4

Baseball Therapy: Framing the At-Bat
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-17

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5

Prospectus Feature: The Only Rule Is You Have To Answer My Questions
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-11

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8

Baseball Therapy: The Even Slightly More Convincing Argument Against the Shift
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-03

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10

Baseball Therapy: The Pretty Good Case That the Shift Doesn't Work
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-27

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7

Baseball Therapy: Can Teams Come Back From a Comeback?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-19

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17

Baseball Therapy: The One About Exit Velocity
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-12

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5

Baseball Therapy: Somebody Is Finally Trying to Kill the Traditional Closer Role
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-07

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1

Baseball Therapy: Go Ahead, Call It a Comeback
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-05

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8

Baseball Therapy: Someone's Not Paying Attention
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-29

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7

Baseball Therapy: It Worked Last Time
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-22

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4

Baseball Therapy: Are You Cultured?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-15

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8

Baseball Therapy: Bringing Down The House
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-08

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1

Baseball Therapy: Should Someone Save Salvy?
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-01

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19

Baseball Therapy: Let's Talk About Tax Policy
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-23

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13

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Times Through The Order Penalty?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-16

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7

Baseball Therapy: Do Bad PECOTA Projections Make Teams Mad?
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-09

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13

Baseball Therapy: The Crack in the Defensive Spectrum
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-02

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20

Baseball Therapy: The Dark Side of Pitch Framing?
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: It's Nice to Have Options
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-19

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2

Baseball Therapy: Let's Figure Out What a Scouting Department's Entire Product is Worth
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-12

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7

Baseball Therapy: Put Russell In the Hall of Fame
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-05

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12

Baseball Therapy: Now With 50 Percent Less Math
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-31

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2

Best of BP 2015: Why Not Make the Hole Square?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-22

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8

Baseball Therapy: We Can Be Heroes?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-16

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17

Baseball Therapy: Have We Been Underpricing Relievers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-08

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6

Baseball Therapy: Fiddlesticks, Yeah!
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-01

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5

Baseball Therapy: The Neuropsychology of Bad Managing
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-24

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7

Baseball Therapy: The Kimbrel Gambit
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-19

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6

Baseball Therapy: What Should the QO Number Be?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-10

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3

Baseball Therapy: I Want to Write About Player Development
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-03

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8

Baseball Therapy: How Much the DH Rule Matters
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-28

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8

Baseball Therapy: And on the Fifth Day He Rested
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-20

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5

Baseball Therapy: Say You'll Remember Me
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-13

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14

Baseball Therapy: Do We Still Need Divisions?
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-06

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9

Baseball Therapy: My Bad Baseball Predictions
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-29

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6

Baseball Therapy: Let Him Pitch!
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-23

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Going Streaking
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-22

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10

Baseball Therapy: Why Do Pitchers Get Tired?
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-15

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4

Baseball Therapy: Seven Months Has Gone So Fast
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-09

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11

Baseball Therapy: The Chessmaster and the Screwball
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-03

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5

Baseball Therapy: A Veteran and His Presents
by
Russell A. Carleton

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If you want a bunch of Zobrists, it helps to plant them early. Are teams doing it?

We live in an era of short benches. Recently, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred made news when he admitted that the league office has had discussions about new restrictions for teams around how they can use relievers (and how many). There’s nothing imminent, but Manfred cited the dominance of relievers in recent years and hinted that the move would bring a little offensive spark back into the game. Plus, we all know the complaints about innings where a team uses four pitchers. Because they have eight relievers on the roster.

Read the full article...

Do different looks give hitters fits? You won't BELIEVE the answer. (You probably will.)

Now pitching for the Milwaukee Brewers. Number 21. Jeremy Jeffress.

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On finding answers in unanswerable questions.

Let’s think outside the box. You know. “The box.” The box that every single motivational speaker and business consultant and hack writer tells you that you need to think outside of, before reaching for one of the acceptable 10 examples of out-of-the-box thinking. (Did you know that Post-It notes were created by accident? All because someone had the idea to think outside of the box!) “The box” is now—ironically enough—a tired metaphor for thinking in ways that aren’t creative. I’m always amused by the fact that people call for “outside the box” thinking, and then never talk about how that’s to be accomplished. The problem is that we are all trapped inside a mime’s box. How do you step outside a box that neither you nor anyone else can actually see?

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What can Starting Lineup figurines and Abraham Lincoln teach us about baseball research?

Somewhere at my parents’ house, there’s a Starting Lineup figurine of Jose Canseco, depicting him during his Bash Brothers days with the Oakland A’s. I got it for Christmas one year back in the days when Jose Canseco was my favorite player. I would have been nine or ten at the time and he was ... let’s just say the words “Jose Canseco” evoked a different image back in the late 80s/early 90s than they do now. Canseco had won the 1986 Rookie of the Year award at 21 and the 1988 MVP at 23, hitting 40 home runs and stealing 40 bases in the same year. At the time, Canseco seemed like the guy we would all look back on some day and tell our kids that we saw him play.

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Are front offices nurturing a garden where great new ideas can sprout?

This is the last in a four-part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from. Part 2 looked at the cost of internships. Part 3 considered the implications of the Ivy League's takeover of front offices.

This is the final installment in a series that has examined the major-league front office. If big-league players are actually just guys in funny pajamas, then the front office workers are just (mostly) guys in funny polo shirts. But who are the people wearing those polo shirts (and how can I become one)? We’ve spent the past few articles looking at that question—in BP style—using a data-driven approach.

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The path to a front office job starts in the college application process.

This is the third in a four-part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from. Part 2 looked at the cost of internships.

Major League Baseball wants more diversity in its 30 front offices, and in the main league office as well. The league has taken steps to address the issue, including hiring former Pittsburgh Pirates Director of Baseball Personnel Tyrone Brooks this winter to be the Senior Director of its Front Office and Field Staff Diversity Pipeline Program.

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The path to a career in baseball runs increasingly through one very expensive toll booth.

This is the second in a four part series on the challenges of working in baseball. Part 1 looked at where front office workers come from.

Do you love baseball and have a good understanding of analytics? More importantly, are you independently wealthy? Congratulations, you can afford to be an intern with a baseball team and not rack up debt!

Read the full article...

The first in a four-part series about the path to working in a major-league team's front office.

The Front Office is at once a mythical place where magical things happen and a very boring office. It’s a place where besuited heroes tame dragons and collect unicorns that will decide the fate of your favorite team, and also a place where a small group of guys (and yes, most of them are men—we’ll talk about that) make boring administrative decisions about the logistics of running something that is one part Broadway show, one part athletic competition, and one part actual business.

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Moving the strike zone up seems a simple, elegant solution to what ails offense. But won't anybody think of the unintended consequences!?

Last week, Major League Baseball announced a proposed change to the strike zone. In response to a zone that continued to sag downward, MLB’s competition committee has recommended that the definition of the bottom boundary of the strike zone be changed from the hollow under the kneecap to the top of the knee. It doesn’t seem like much. That’s maybe two inches of space, although the actual called strike zone has always differed somewhat from the rulebook strike zone, but if the changes are put into effect for 2017, then pitchers might be feeling a little more squeezed next year.

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Is Tony Wolters the answer to 24 years of mile-high pitching woes?

Good-framing catchers, as best as we can define them, seem to have magical powers. They can “steal” extra strikes for their pitchers, and while it might not seem like much in the moment to get an extra borderline call, it adds up. The generally accepted consensus has been that the top framers can save their team 20 runs compared to a merely average framer. Compared to the bottom of the barrel, that swing is 40 runs. When the general public figured out how big that effect was, they rightly made a big deal about it. (When teams found out, they quietly made a big deal out of it. In fact, in Francisco Cervelli’s case, they just made more than 30 million big deals about it.)

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Russell sits down with Ben and Sam to discuss the experience of writing and living through their best-selling book, The Only Rule Is It Has To Work.

This one is special. Many of the people reading this article have already bought and read the book The Only Rule Is It Has to Work, by Baseball Prospectus’s own editor-in-chief, Sam Miller and our former editor-in-chief, Ben Lindbergh, about the summer they spent running the Pacific Association’s Sonoma Stompers. And somewhere in the blitz of press that they have been doing to promote the book, they took some time to chat with me.

As we were setting up before the interview, I apologized in advance for the fact that I am not a real journalist, and I’ve never really done a sit-down interview like this before. The only model that I really had to draw from was my time when I worked as a therapist. I told them that the only rule was that they had to answer my questions.

(And yeah, there are a few spoilers in here…)

I don’t know that I can properly plug the book in a way that hasn’t already been done, but I will try. There’s a certain fantasy that someday, if we just yell loud enough, teams, managers, fans, and everyone else will stop doing all of the irrational things that we yell loudly about. This book made me think, “Huh, maybe I’m the one who needs to stop yelling.”

***

Russell: I think that most of the readers at Baseball Prospectus know the story of how the project was conceived. I think a good place for us to start would be during the gestational period. There was a point where you had sent all the e-mails and phone calls and everyone had signed off, and there was probably a moment of “Oh dear, what am I getting myself into?” But then there was some preparation before, Ben, you took the cross-country flight and Sam, you got into your Honda Fit and drove out to Sonoma. Tell me about how you prepared for what you thought was about to happen.

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The super-cool, super-modern, super-fun strategy that might not be doing anything.

Last week, we looked into The Shift and whether it was actually doing what we said it was supposed to do, which is to be a better way of getting hitters, especially pull-happy hitters (and double especially groundball-heavy, pull-happy, left-handed hitters) to make more outs. The traditional story of The Shift is that because those hitters are going to be sending most of their ground balls to one side of the field, why not put more fielders over that way?

Read the full article...

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