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Kate Morrison 

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03-27

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2

Looking Back on Tomorrow: Texas Rangers
by
Kate Morrison

03-01

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8

Prospectus Feature: The Marketing of Baseball
by
Kate Morrison

12-20

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28

2017 Prospects: Texas Rangers Top 10 Prospects
by
Jeffrey Paternostro, Kate Morrison and BP Prospect Staff

12-12

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3

Transaction Analysis: Angels Load Up On Infield D
by
Matthew Trueblood, Kate Morrison and David Lee

11-22

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4

Prospectus Feature: MLB's Ongoing Search for Front Office Diversity
by
Russell A. Carleton and Kate Morrison

10-19

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Take a Loss, Save a Bullpen
by
Kate Morrison

10-11

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2

Prospectus Feature: AFL Preview: Surprise Saguaros
by
Steve Givarz, Kate Morrison, Jarrett Seidler and Wilson Karaman

10-08

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Trying to Remember the Rangers Are Good
by
Kate Morrison

10-06

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0

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALDS Game 1 Previews
by
Kate Morrison and Matthew Trueblood

09-27

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1

Prospectus Feature: The Joy of Adrian Beltre
by
Kate Morrison

08-02

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0

Transaction Analysis: Lucroy Vetoes His Way To Texas
by
Bryan Grosnick, Kate Morrison and Ben Carsley

07-01

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20

Prospectus Feature: The 7,500 Apprentices
by
Kate Morrison

06-23

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8

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-22

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-21

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4

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

06-20

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5

The Perils Of MLB's Sorting System
by
Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton

05-25

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2

Transaction Analysis: Return of The Freak
by
Matthew Trueblood, Kate Morrison, Bryan Grosnick, Adam McInturff, Steve Givarz and Christopher Crawford

04-18

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30

Prospectus Feature: The Women's Version of Baseball is Baseball
by
Kate Morrison

02-08

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7

Prospect Debate: How Far Has Appel Fallen?
by
Brendan Gawlowski, Adam McInturff and Kate Morrison

11-01

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2

Playoff Prospectus: Live by the Clutch, Die by the Clutch
by
Kate Morrison

10-22

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6

BP Unfiltered: Everybody Gets A Stupid Outfield Thing!
by
Kate Morrison

10-20

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10

Playoff Prospectus: There He Goes Again
by
Kate Morrison

10-13

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9

Playoff Prospectus: The Greatest Mop-Up Man In Playoff History: ALDS Game 4
by
Kate Morrison

10-12

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Oh, *Those* Toronto Blue Jays: ALDS Game 3
by
Kate Morrison

10-10

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1

Playoff Prospectus: The Rougned Show Goes Long: ALDS Game 2
by
Kate Morrison

09-06

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8

Prospectus Feature: Is Matt Harvey Okay?
by
Kate Morrison

08-01

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6

Transaction Analysis: Houston is Hip to Gomez
by
J.P. Breen, Kate Morrison, Christopher Crawford, Brendan Gawlowski, Wilson Karaman and Mike Gianella

07-31

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0

Transaction Analysis: Relievers, Left and Right
by
R.J. Anderson, Christopher Crawford, Matthew Trueblood, Jeff Long, Dustin Palmateer and Kate Morrison

07-30

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11

Transaction Analysis: Rangers Go HAMels
by
Matthew Trueblood, Jeff Moore, Kate Morrison, Colin Young and Mike Gianella

06-02

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7

The Call-Up: Joey Gallo
by
Kate Morrison and Bret Sayre

05-10

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2

BP Unfiltered: Wandy Rodriguez Throws A Hidden Reverse Humber
by
Kate Morrison

03-31

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3

Every Team's Moneyball: Texas Rangers: Shortstop Depth
by
Kate Morrison

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Flip that coin again.

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Baseball is trying to reach a bigger, younger audience, but its marketing has yet to reach the 21st century.

For an industry with no direct competitors, a brighter inside future than ever, and a very owner-and-league-friendly system of dispensing with profits, Major League Baseball sure seems convinced that they’re dying. And for a company publicly despairing, they don’t seem to have any understanding of what little things they could do to make life easier on themselves. Nowhere is this more apparent than in their seeming inability to move their marketing efforts into the 21st century.

No matter what kind of organization you run, from a small start-up to a multinational telecom[1], the fundamentals of the game are the same: How do you communicate your message to the people you want to reach? How do you determine who you want to communicate with? What image of yourself do you want to communicate?

These three questions are what it all boils down to. It is extremely easy to get lost in the day-to-day of marketing, in the buzz of new ideas and what’s “hot” at the moment. It’s more difficult to refine down to the fundamentals.

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Down in Dealey Plaza, the tourists mill about. And I am far from where we live, and I have not learned how to forgive, but I will wait, I will wait, I will wait.

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December 12, 2016 6:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Angels Load Up On Infield D

3

Matthew Trueblood, Kate Morrison and David Lee

Danny Espinosa joins Team Trout, Tyrell Jenkins gets a fresh start in Texas, and Atlanta adds Luke Jackson to the bullpen.

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MLB parted ways with the Korn Ferry search firm as it continues to struggle filling front office roles with minority candidates.

It’s Thanksgiving, which means it’s time to travel several hundred miles to have an awkward dinner with your family. It’s a season of eating too much, rehashing old family arguments that were silly to begin with and even sillier 20 years later, and dealing with Uncle Larry. You know Uncle Larry. The one who voted for that candidate whom you can’t stand and who would now like to take a few moments to describe why he did so.

We here at Baseball Prospectus know that you’ve probably come to the site to get away from it all and to think about topics that aren’t so emotionally loaded. So, as a public service, we figured we’d write about race. It’s OK, both our Uncles Larry voted for Rick Porcello too.

Last week, Bob Nightengale of USA Today reported that Major League Baseball is no longer working with executive search firm Korn Ferry, whom the league had retained a little more than a year ago to help teams identify racial and ethnic minorities to fill front office vacancies. When Korn Ferry was hired, there was a growing concern internally that nearly all of the top executives in the game were white, and MLB wanted to do something about it.

To bolster their efforts, MLB created an internal Diversity Pipeline Initiative, headed by former Pirates director of baseball personnel Tyrone Brooks. In the past year, though, several general managers have been politely excused from their duties and have been replaced, mostly by 30-something, statistically-savvy Caucasian guys who used to work for the Cleveland Indians[1].

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Cleveland finally lost for the first time this postseason, but it wasn't all bad news for Corey Kluber and the Indians.

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Notes on the Surprise roster.

Surprise Saguaros- Red Sox, Royals, Twins, Pirates, Rangers

The Guys You Know

Yoan Moncada, 2B/3B, Boston Red Sox - (#2 on Midseason Top 50) - Eyewitness Report

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Toronto takes a 2-0 lead over Texas as the ALDS heads to Canada.

Here’s the thing: The Texas Rangers are a good team. Maybe they’re a good team that was helped a little by whatever luck or deity-type-thing you prefer in the regular season, but they’re a good team. The Toronto Blue Jays are also a good team. Their luck was maybe a little more confined to simple human err in a one-game playoff, but luck it still was, and so they found themselves in Arlington these last two games, riding on a wave of momentum that seemed like it could take on any day’s pitcher.

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Game 1 for Blue Jays-Rangers and Red Sox-Indians.

If you believe the earnest quotes of every Texas Rangers and Toronto Blue Jays player or coach, there won’t be a basebrawl during this series because everyone very much wants to play baseball and win baseball games. We’ll see how long that decision actually stands, though.

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Adrian Beltre is a Hall of Fame player, but his impact goes beyond the numbers.

There has never been anyone like Adrián Beltré.

This is where one would normally jump into a dissection of his incredible talent and on-field accomplishments, and then end in a rigorous whacking-over-the-head with his Hall of Fame-worthy accreditations. Maybe we should, anyway, but what really stands out when Adrián Beltré plays baseball is joy.

Beltré is one of the best third basemen to ever play the game, with one of the more unusual careers. He’s an offensive dynamo, a defensive wizard, and his successes on the biggest stage could be an excuse for him to be any average dour and over-serious veteran player--or at least, the kind of personality void that happens from prolonged exposure to the media.

Instead, Beltré approaches games like there’s nothing else he’d rather do. He’s one of the rare people in the game who can treat it with the levity it deserves without inciting the ire of less-forgiving opponents. He approaches every plate appearance with purpose--with dedication to his craft and an honoring of his talent--but imbued in all that is joy.

It’s difficult to talk about this kind of thing without tipping straight over into raw sentiment, something that has its place in this game, but not overmuch. It might even be easy to diminish the accomplishments of the player in over-simplifying him to a set of reactions and meme-able GIFs, instead of taking it all in as a whole and marveling at both the humor and the pride.

Beltré dances, runs away from tags, pulls runners off the bag, walks up to the plate with his helmet on backwards, and messes with umpires. He’s also a deeply respected clubhouse presence, the first off the bench in the case of an altercation, and the captain who doesn’t need a “C” to determine his legacy. In an age when any kind of showboating can lead to full-out brawls, Beltré hits home runs from one knee.

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Jonathan Lucroy may end up being the most valuable deadline pickup, with a chance to help the Rangers on both sides of the ball.

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Professionalism isn't something to pick and choose, though some might have you believe that.

Guilder Rodriguez played 14 years in organized baseball, and seven games in the major leagues. Nick Williams was just publicly humiliated by his manager for not showing whatever arbitrary amount of hustle was needed on an obvious out in a hum-drum game. The Frisco RoughRiders finished up a baseball game close to 11:00 PM CT, boarded a charter bus, and arrived in Midland, TX at 5:00 AM to play a game at 2:00 PM that afternoon.

Major League Baseball would have you believe that these are all well and good things for players who are, according to them, not actually “professionals,” but instead seasonal apprentices or interns, per their press release supporting the abomination that is H.B. 5580.

Let’s take a look at that press release, why don’t we? Nothing is more fun than breaking a piece of what one would assume is carefully constructed communication down line by line.

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