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Jeff Quinton 

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11-24

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4

Transaction Analysis: Career-Years and Old Upside
by
Jeff Quinton, Wilson Karaman and Bret Sayre

10-17

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALCS Game 3 Preview
by
Jeff Quinton

10-11

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and NLDS Game 4 Previews
by
Bryan Grosnick and Jeff Quinton

10-08

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and NLDS Game 2 Previews
by
Jeff Quinton

10-06

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2

Tools of Ignorance: Showalter, Decisions, and Regrets
by
Jeff Quinton

08-18

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10

Tools of Ignorance: The Trades Remain the Same
by
Jeff Quinton

08-15

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11

Tools of Ignorance: Why Was Chapman So Expensive?
by
Jeff Quinton

08-02

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9

Transaction Analysis: The Penny-Pinching Pirates Pitching Parade
by
Jeff Quinton, Ben Carsley, Joshua Howsam, Gideon Turk, Craig Goldstein, Adam McInturff, Jeffrey Paternostro and Bryan Grosnick

07-30

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Transaction Analysis: Marlins Gonna Marlins
by
Adam McInturff, Dustin Palmateer, Steve Givarz, Jeff Quinton and Jeffrey Paternostro

07-29

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0

The Quinton: Searching for Trade Deadline Targets
by
Jeff Quinton

07-20

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0

The Quinton: Is There a Best Day (of the Week) to Trade?
by
Jeff Quinton

07-07

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Player Profile: Matt Kemp
by
Jeff Quinton

07-01

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The Quinton: Trading With or As the Leader
by
Jeff Quinton

06-30

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Tools of Ignorance: Is Now the Time to Sell?
by
Jeff Quinton

06-24

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Player Profile: Zach Davies
by
Jeff Quinton

06-17

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The Quinton: In-Season Solutions, Missed
by
Jeff Quinton

06-08

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4

Fantasy Freestyle: Mark Trumbo and Being Wrong
by
Jeff Quinton

06-06

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Transaction Analysis: Small Trade James
by
James Fegan, Jeff Quinton, Christopher Crawford and Bryan Grosnick

05-26

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13

Tools of Ignorance: The Team-Mandated Player Opt-Out
by
Jeff Quinton

05-23

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2

The Quinton: Trades, Supply Chains, and Lead Times
by
Jeff Quinton

05-12

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The Quinton: The Cost of a Trade
by
Jeff Quinton

05-04

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Tools of Ignorance: The Somewhat Dubious Outlook For the Next Generation of Rebuilds
by
Jeff Quinton

04-22

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1

Free Agent Watch: Week Four
by
J.P. Breen and Jeff Quinton

04-21

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The Quinton: The Big Trade, Untouchables, and Storytelling
by
Jeff Quinton

04-12

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The Quinton: Bold Predictions and Confirmation Bias
by
Jeff Quinton

04-08

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7

Free Agent Watch: Week One
by
J.P. Breen and Jeff Quinton

04-05

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10

The Quinton: Keeper-League Auction Takeaways
by
Jeff Quinton

04-02

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TINO (There Is No Offseason): Ep. 67: Avocados
by
George Bissell, Ben Carsley, Craig Goldstein and Jeff Quinton

04-01

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0

My Model Portfolio: Punting Saves
by
Jeff Quinton

03-22

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5

The Quinton: Beating the Wisdom of the Crowd
by
Jeff Quinton

03-14

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Flags Fly Forever Podcast: Ep. 82: Draft Strategy with Jeff Quinton
by
George Bissell and Jeff Quinton

03-14

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4

The Quinton: On Paying for Saves
by
Jeff Quinton

03-04

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5

Tools of Ignorance: The Dodgers' Breakable Rotation
by
Jeff Quinton

02-29

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1

The Quinton: Partaking in Both Auctions and Drafts
by
Jeff Quinton

02-23

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1

TINO (There Is No Offseason): Ep. 64: The BP Annual Drinking Game
by
George Bissell, Ben Carsley, Craig Goldstein, Bret Sayre, Meg Rowley, Matt Sussman and Jeff Quinton

02-22

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The Quinton: The Biggest Advantage of Mock Drafts
by
Jeff Quinton

02-19

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10

The Quinton: On Reaching
by
Jeff Quinton

02-08

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The Quinton: Shortstops, Uncertainty, and Scarcity
by
Jeff Quinton

02-08

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7

Tools of Ignorance: Forget It, Jake
by
Jeff Quinton

02-01

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2

The Quinton: Third Base, Year-to-Year Shifts, and Reference Points
by
Jeff Quinton

01-27

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5

The Quinton: Trades That Aren't Being Made
by
Jeff Quinton

01-18

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2

The Quinton: The Representativeness Heuristic and Baseball Positions
by
Jeff Quinton

01-13

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The Quinton: Strategy Planning, Sub-Strategies, and Catcher Strategies
by
Jeff Quinton

01-04

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6

The Quinton: Two New Year's Resolutions
by
Jeff Quinton

12-30

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1

Best of BP 2015: Winning By Design
by
Jeff Quinton

12-28

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11

Tools of Ignorance: Behavioral Economics and the Rise of the Player Opt-Out
by
Jeff Quinton

12-18

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The Quinton: Valuing Disappointing Players
by
Jeff Quinton

12-09

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2

Transaction Analysis: Cubs Implement Flextime
by
Jeff Quinton, Sahadev Sharma and J.P. Breen

12-08

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5

Transaction Analysis: Sorry We Broke Up, Soria Missed You
by
R.J. Anderson, Sahadev Sharma, Rian Watt and Jeff Quinton

12-07

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The Quinton: Negotiating the Trade Process
by
Jeff Quinton

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Hold the turkey! Arizona and Seattle made a big pre-Thanksgiving swap.

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October 17, 2016 6:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALCS Game 3 Preview

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Jeff Quinton

Trevor Bauer vs. Marcus Stroman, in Toronto.

After the Indians took the first two games of the series in Cleveland, the Blue Jays turn to Opening Day starter Marcus Stroman to avoid falling behind 3-0. The Indians, meanwhile, will start Trevor Bauer as they look to continue their loss-free postseason.

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October 11, 2016 10:36 am

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and NLDS Game 4 Previews

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Bryan Grosnick and Jeff Quinton

Must-win home games for the Dodgers and the Giants.

The Nationals moved up 2-1 on the Dodgers with Monday’s decisive 8-3 victory. To celebrate, both teams have decided to make my life a living hell and put off announcing their Game 4 starters until well after my deadline. Seriously, we don’t know which of Best Pitcher in the World Clayton Kershaw or Wunderkind Julio Urias will be taking the ball for Game 4, nor do we know if Dusty Baker will line up Joe Ross or Reynaldo Lopez to face L.A. We don’t know anything, other than that the Dodgers are in the hot seat.

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October 8, 2016 10:07 am

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and NLDS Game 2 Previews

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Jeff Quinton

Rich Hill vs. Tanner Roark in Washington and Jeff Samardzija vs. Kyle Hendricks in Chicago.

The Nationals, with Tanner Roark taking the mound, look to even the series in Game 2 after their Game 1 comeback came up one run short. Rich Hill, previously disabled by blisters, will take the mound for the Dodgers.

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How will Tuesday affect the decisions of Buck Showalter moving forward?

Buck Showalter most likely regrets his decision not to use Zach Britton in this year’s AL Wild card game. Regret, though, can be a tricky phenomenon. For instance, regret likely played a large part in Showalter’s decision to not use Britton. How so? Well, when Showalter was quoted defending his decision after the game as saying that “it’s an away game,” he was really saying that he feared using Britton only to have a lesser pitcher blow a lead in a save situation with Britton unavailable. Showalter was saying that he feared he would regret making a decision that could lead to that sequence of events.

This type of decision, one in which we make a decision in the attempt to avoid what we imagine to be the worst outcome possible (as opposed to trying to make the best decision possible), is fairly common place. How many times have you not applied for a job because you do not know if it would be any better than your current job? How many times have you not asked someone on a date that you wished you had? How many times have you not raised your hand in your class when you had a question? How many times have you decided to go back to the same restaurant instead of trying the new place? How many times at that same restaurant have you ordered the same thing? We so often choose the devil we know versus the devil we do not know, we so often choose the safety of the routine and of inaction often for no other reason than our being people—social organisms wired to fit in, wired to not do anything we might come to regret. It is therefore not surprising that even people at the top of their fields like Showalter could convince themselves into making poor decisions if only to avoid future regret.

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Practically every major trade in baseball fits into the same mold. Why isn't there more variety?

By all accounts we just wrapped up a thrilling trade deadline. The volume, the drama, the last minute-ness, the quality of players—both major and minor leaguers—was more than those looking to be entertained could have hoped for. Those (if such a population exists) looking for variety in trades, though, were likely disappointed. Sure, we got a good, redundant major leaguer for another, somewhat redundant, major leaguer trade in the Matt (Duffy and Moore) swap, and a salary dump (Liriano to the Blue Jays), but every other trade was minor leaguers for major leaguers (usually on contracts expiring at this or next season’s end). There are tons of variations within this type of trade, but it is all the same kind of trade. This type of trade, of course, makes sense—teams that have a chance to win this year value certain players more than teams that do not have such a chance; and when two teams value a player a differently, there is always an opportunity for a trade.

But, why then, do certain players that should be valued differently (such as Jeremy Hellickson) not get traded? Also, how is it possible that over the past 10 years, no two teams have said, “I like your third baseman more than my third baseman and you like my third baseman more than your third baseman” and just swapped them? Or how has this not happened for any other position? We see this once in a while with sixth starters and inconsequential relievers, but we never see this with any primetime players. Why don’t we see this? I believe there are several contributing factors that I will discuss below. I also believe there are several (or more) contributing factors I have not thought of and, thus, will not discuss below.

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The Cubs are a well-run organization who, relative to other buyers this summer, seemed to overpay for Aroldis Chapman. Do we need to reframe their choice?

Esteemed colleague and possessor of a terrific first name, Jeff Long, recently wrote about why teams in contention might pay a lot for relievers, even though, as Long writes, “It’s a formula that the sabermetric community sometimes finds difficult to rationalize. Relievers pitch so few innings and are so volatile that their value is almost certainly lower than that of the prospects dealt for them.” As to why teams in contention do this anyway, Long concludes that when the playoffs come teams cannot simply accumulate WARP; they need to actually win individual games, and really good relievers help teams do so. That makes sense to me. It makes sense to me why teams add relievers to improve their chances of winning right now even if they are going to end up accumulating less WARP from a given trade. But what does still does not quite make sense to me is why Aroldis Chapman was so expensive compared to other relievers or other players traded at the deadline.

How expensive was it? Please find an email from me to Chris Crawford, and Crawford’s responding email below:

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The Pirates trade two starters, get back two more, and come out two prospects shallower than they were at the start of the day.

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Seven players change hands in a deal that might seem confusing for any team but the Marlins.

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July 29, 2016 6:00 am

The Quinton: Searching for Trade Deadline Targets

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Jeff Quinton

How to identify the players you should seek in your upcoming fantasy barters.

Earlier this week our wonderful fantasy staff put together their Second-Half Buys. I, absent such fullness of wonder, did not participate, and for that, I apologize. To make up for this, my plan is to help us try to develop some tools for finding our own second-half buys, our own trade targets.

This skill, finding trade targets, is incredibly important, obviously, but it is likely even more important in today’s (fantasy baseball) game. Why is it more important today than it was ten years ago? Because, as we have said many times, the internet has made it difficult to differentiate via information asymmetry. Put differently, as soon as we posted our staff’s “second-half buys,” those players likely became more difficult to acquire—either their acquisition price in trade or FAAB went up or someone looked to scoop them from the free agent pool. This does not hold true for every player or recommendation (some fantasy baseball participants do not read fantasy analysis and some only read some sites), but it holds true for more players than you, or at least I, originally thought. Why? Because these recommendations are not random strokes of genius. We, as a fantasy baseball analysis community, largely follow the same twitter accounts, read the same articles, and are thus likely to write-up and analyze the same player because those players are most likely to be top of mind. This is not a criticism, it is just how our brains work, and I point it out in order to highlight the increased importance of finding trade targets outside of and in addition to recommendations from fantasy baseball experts. Moreover, the more players we can target, the more we can shop around for the best price. Lastly, not everyone wants to put in the effort, so those willing to do so can often get better than expected deals.

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July 20, 2016 6:00 am

The Quinton: Is There a Best Day (of the Week) to Trade?

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Jeff Quinton

Why most barters occur on the day weekly transactions are processed, and how to take advantage of such trends.

Fantasy baseball trades, as we have discussed previously, tend to happen at certain times. They happen after the last of the big free agents sign in the offseason, right before the keeper deadline, and right before the league’s trading deadline. More than anything though, at least in the leagues in which I participate, trades happen on the day of weekly transaction. For many leagues, this day is Sunday. These days, especially at this time of the year in leagues with active trade markets, are fun days. If we’re lucky, the messages, emails, and texts are flying as we see what is out there and try to improve our team.

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July 7, 2016 11:16 am

Player Profile: Matt Kemp

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Jeff Quinton

The Padres outfielder has seen his once-electric tools diminish, but is he still a significant fantasy asset?

Matt Kemp, out of Midwest City High School, was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the sixth round of the 2003 MLB draft. Upon debuting in 2006 (his age-22 season), Kemp hit the ground running as an impact fantasy baseball player. He proved to be a speed and power threat from the start, hitting seven home runs and stealing six bases in 166 plate appearances in 2006. An early season shoulder injury and a subsequent 39 game stint in Triple-A limited Kemp to 98 games played in 2007, but his potential as an impact five-category player was on full display as he roto-slashed .342/10/47/42/10 (AVG/HR/R/RBI/SB).

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