CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Bob Hertzel 

Bob Hertzel

Bob Hertzel has been a member of the Baseball Writers Association of America for more than four decades. He will occasionally reflect on some of the great players, great moments and unusual characters that he has covered as a baseball writer.

Search Articles by Bob Hertzel

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

01-12

comment icon

32

Another Look: The All-Non-Hall of Fame Team
by
Bob Hertzel

01-06

comment icon

2

Another Look: Bert Blyleven
by
Bob Hertzel

12-22

comment icon

8

Another Look: Bob Feller
by
Bob Hertzel

12-13

comment icon

36

Another Look: Marvin Miller
by
Bob Hertzel

12-06

comment icon

0

Another Look: Ron Santo
by
Bob Hertzel

11-29

comment icon

16

Another Look: Willie Mays
by
Bob Hertzel

11-23

comment icon

8

Another Look: Dick Allen
by
Bob Hertzel

11-15

comment icon

3

Another Look: The Yankee Princess
by
Bob Hertzel

11-09

comment icon

4

Another Look: The Joe Morgan Trade
by
Bob Hertzel

11-02

comment icon

5

Another Look: 1989 World Series Earthquake
by
Bob Hertzel

10-26

comment icon

32

Another Look: Chuck Tanner and the 1979 Pirates
by
Bob Hertzel

10-19

comment icon

10

Another Look: Kirk Gibson's Homer
by
Bob Hertzel

10-12

comment icon

15

Another Look: The 1972 World Series
by
Bob Hertzel

10-05

comment icon

5

Another Look: Joe Torre and Casey Stengel
by
Bob Hertzel

09-28

comment icon

9

Another Look: Baseball Digest
by
Bob Hertzel

09-21

comment icon

17

Another Look: Hall of Fame Pitchers Becoming an Extinct Species
by
Bob Hertzel

09-14

comment icon

74

Another Look: Reconsidering Pete Rose
by
Bob Hertzel

09-07

comment icon

27

Another Look: Unbreakable Records
by
Bob Hertzel

08-31

comment icon

15

Another Look: Hitting Pitchers and Some Who Couldn't
by
Bob Hertzel

08-24

comment icon

6

Another Look: Lefty's Remarkable Streak
by
Bob Hertzel

08-17

comment icon

0

Another Look: The Unknown Comics
by
Bob Hertzel

08-10

comment icon

4

Another Look: Willie, Mickey, and the Duke
by
Bob Hertzel

08-03

comment icon

6

Another Look: Do No More
by
Bob Hertzel

07-27

comment icon

5

Another Look: Andy Van Slyke
by
Bob Hertzel

07-20

comment icon

5

Another Look: George Steinbrenner
by
Bob Hertzel

07-13

comment icon

2

Another Look: The 1952 Pirates
by
Bob Hertzel

07-06

comment icon

2

Another Look: Mal Fichman
by
Bob Hertzel

06-29

comment icon

2

Another Look: Remembering Donald Davidson
by
Bob Hertzel

06-22

comment icon

6

Another Look: Mascot Mania
by
Bob Hertzel

06-15

comment icon

7

Another Look: Pitchers Who Fizzled
by
Bob Hertzel

06-08

comment icon

15

Another Look: Baseball Truly is a Funny Game
by
Bob Hertzel

06-01

comment icon

2

Another Look: A Six Pack of No-Hitters
by
Bob Hertzel

05-25

comment icon

6

Another Look: Growing Up with a Future Big Leaguer
by
Bob Hertzel

05-11

comment icon

3

Another Look: Sparky Anderson
by
Bob Hertzel

04-27

comment icon

4

Another Look: Clemente's Last Hit
by
Bob Hertzel

04-20

comment icon

8

Another Look: Remembering Chico Ruiz
by
Bob Hertzel

<< Previous Author Entries Next Author Entries >>

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 12, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: The 1972 World Series

15

Bob Hertzel

This Fall Classic wasn't just a thriller but a seminal moment in the changing of the baseball's culture.

You had to be there.

There really isn’t much else you can say about the World Series of 1972, a Fall Classic that was among the best ever in baseball terms and perhaps the most meaningful ever in terms of the world that was revolving around it at the time.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

The two former Yankees' managers had more in common than you would think.

It was more than a baseball season that passed into yesterday last weekend, a lot more, as Joe Torre’s managerial career came to an apparent end.

He finished it in Dodger blue, but when they put the plaque up in Cooperstown he’ll be wearing pinstripes and the familiar interlocked NY on his cap. One can only hope that Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson, himself a former Yankees public relations director, can find a way to position Torre next to Casey Stengel.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 28, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Baseball Digest

9

Bob Hertzel

Before the Internet boomed to popularity, Baseball Digest was a smorgasbord of reading for fans.

It is difficult to imagine today, but once upon a time there was life without the Internet.

The world, at that time, was not brought to your doorstep, and this was perhaps harder on the baseball fan than on anyone else in the country, for the coverage of the sport was what you found in your local newspaper.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 21, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Hall of Fame Pitchers Becoming an Extinct Species

17

Bob Hertzel

The standards for sending pitchers to Cooperstown need to be redefined.

Perhaps the happiest moments of a long baseball-writing career came in its infancy, days when you would be attending a World Series and gathering at the host hotel, sitting around the lobby talking baseball with men who were legends of the business.

There was one of those days sitting around in Baltimore, when there were, among others, Dick Young, Red Smith, and Jimmy Cannon discussing baseball’s Hall of Fame. While to this day I am not sure which mouth the words came from, the question from that young baseball writer was what these gentlemen thought qualified a player for the Hall of Fame.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 14, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Reconsidering Pete Rose

74

Bob Hertzel

The banned-for-life hit king should get a second chance to be elected to the Hall of Fame.

On Saturday night, given special dispensation by Commissioner Pope Bud I, the Cincinnati Reds honored their hometown hero, Peter Edward Rose, on the 25th anniversary of his 4,192nd career base hit, which made him Major League Baseball's all-time hits leader.

To honor Rose, who had been disgraced by his own actions and then by Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, the only commissioner who was in and of himself the answer to a multiple choice test, was nothing really that significant.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 7, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Unbreakable Records

27

Bob Hertzel

Some marks in baseball's record book seem unreachable—or are they?

As you fly through life on the sweet bird of youth, the wind blowing through your hair until you have no more, you tend to notice things that transpired that you may not have appreciated at the time. This life was one tied closely to the game of baseball, from the first moment of being overtaken by the smell of freshly roasted peanuts in the Polo Grounds, through the daydreams that come with playing in Little League, high school, and college all the way through being professionally involved as media.

The older you get, the more you begin to think back to those young days, time when baseball was king. It was, in your youth, a game played professionally only east of the Mississippi River, mostly north of the Mason-Dixon Line. It was played by white men without exception and so much as the thought of a Japanese player, so close to the end of World War II, seemed impossible. Baseball was a game bathed in history and you were taught that there were some records that would never be broken, records attached to names that seemed magical from the past.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 31, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Hitting Pitchers and Some Who Couldn't

15

Bob Hertzel

Some pitchers defy the norm and can handle the bat but the majority can't and some have been historically bad.

On July 3, 1966, in San Francisco, history was made as a member of the Atlanta Braves hit not one, but two grand slam home runs in the same game.

That, of course, by itself would have made it something of a memorable afternoon, considering only 13 players in the history of the game have hit two grand slams in the same game. But this was not Henry Aaron, Joe Torre, or Rico Carty --sluggers all-- who hit them. It wasn’t even Felipe Alou, who actually went hitless in this 17-3 game, perhaps thinking about the birth of son, Moises, that memorable day.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 24, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Lefty's Remarkable Streak

6

Bob Hertzel

Few pitchers have ever had a better run than Steve Carlton did when he won 15 in a row in 1972.

What is it like to be the greatest pitcher on the face of the planet? Steve Carlton knew in 1972, but he wasn’t talking.

It is difficult to imagine today just how good Carlton was that season. Even the numbers do not do it justice, and they are rather impressive, to say the least. He went 27-10 with a 1.97 ERA, pitched 30 complete games out of 41 starts and worked 346 1/3 innings with 310 strikeouts and 87 walks in his first year with the Philadelphia Phillies.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

"Clubbies" are an anonymous lot but they have sure done some funny things over the years.

Today I’m going to tell you about my favorite baseball character and a few of his cohorts. None of them ever wore a major-league uniform, but they’ve all washed a lot of them.

They are the custodians of the major-league clubhouses, and once upon a time they were among the most carefree and careless of people in the world. That was when the clubhouses were small, not the luxury palaces all the modern stadia have brought to the major leagues, and when the "clubbies," as they're known, were as flaky as the cereal they’d have available before day games.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 10, 2010 11:15 am

Another Look: Willie, Mickey, and the Duke

4

Bob Hertzel

The 1950s were a magical time for a boy growing up in the New York metropolitan area.

The universe wasn’t really very big then, pretty much a triangle from the Polo Grounds to Yankee Stadium to Ebbets Field. The year was 1950. Or was it 1955 or 1956? Didn’t matter really; it was New York and this was the true Golden Age of baseball in the city.

Never has there been anything like it, never will there be. One city, three teams. Heaven on earth when you were 10 or 12 or 15 as I was growing up across the river from New York City in New Jersey.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 3, 2010 8:00 am

Another Look: Do No More

6

Bob Hertzel

A trip in the Wayback Machine shows how baseball has changed over the years.

Let us play pretend for a moment. It is October 3, 1951, and Bobby Thomson just hit The Shot Heard 'Round the World. You go to bed that night with the kind of glow that only a baseball game like that can give you, but strange things happen overnight. Rip Van Winkle and you awake nearly 60 years later.

You notice immediately that much has changed, from the TV you watch the game on to the automobile in which you ride. Oh, you can still get a Coke, sailors still get tattoos, but you quickly notice that so, too, do college coeds in places you didn't know they had places when you went to bed.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

The retired Gold Glove center fielder is now a novelist.

Andy Van Slyke always was something of Renaissance man among ballplayers, a bright light in a clubhouse that sometimes was filled with little more than burned-out bulbs. As a player he was flawless, until Mike Scott, whom he never could hit, was on the mound. However, Van Slyke was even better after the game when he would fire off one-liners that could match anything Jay Leno or David Letterman ever could come up with.

His most famous, perhaps, was this one: "Every season has its peaks and valleys. What you have to do is try to eliminate the Grand Canyon.”

Read the full article...

<< Previous Author Entries Next Author Entries >>