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03-31

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My Model Portfolio: Stars, Scrubs, and High-End Starters
by
Nick Shlain

03-31

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2

Prospectus Feature: All Spin Is Not Alike
by
Alan M. Nathan

03-31

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Closer Report: Week One
by
Matt Collins

03-31

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My Model Portfolio: Framing Decisions Around Value
by
Jeff Quinton

03-31

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Every Team's Moneyball: Texas Rangers: Shortstop Depth
by
Kate Morrison

03-31

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2

Dynasty Dynamics: TINO Does Arizona, 2015
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

03-31

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2

Every Team's Moneyball: Atlanta Braves: Shortstop Instincts
by
R.J. Anderson

03-31

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6

Baseball Therapy: The Most Important Player on the Field
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-31

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40

Pebble Hunting: The Case For Shaming the Cubs
by
Sam Miller

03-30

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3

League Preview Series
by
Craig Goldstein

03-30

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5

Fantasy Freestyle: Shadow Auctioneering
by
Mike Gianella

03-30

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7

The Darkhorses: Batting Average and Home Runs
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-30

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1

The Buyer's Guide: Adam Lind
by
J.P. Breen

03-30

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4

TTO Scoresheet Podcast: National League Players to Monitor
by
Ian Lefkowitz, Ben Murphy and Jared Weiss

03-30

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2

Every Team's Moneyball: Philadelphia Phillies: Changing Habits
by
Christopher Crawford

03-30

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4

Every Team's Moneyball: Toronto Blue Jays: I Gotta Sell High, All The Time
by
Chris Mosch

03-30

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The Week in Quotes: March 23-29, 2015
by
Chris Mosch and Nick Wheatley-Schaller

03-27

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8

Raising Aces: Pitching Trident: Uppers
by
Doug Thorburn

03-27

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2

Every Team's Moneyball: Arizona Diamondbacks: Hidden Snakes
by
Sam Miller

03-27

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8

Pitching Backward: Why Relievers Get A Free Pass
by
Jeff Long

03-27

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7

Every Team's Moneyball: Minnesota Twins: Rebuilding in Plain View
by
Ken Funck

03-27

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0

Skewed Left: History Repeats Itself
by
Zachary Levine

03-27

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7

League Preview Series
by
Jeff Moore

03-27

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5

Fantasy Freestyle: BP Rankings vs. ADP
by
Wilson Karaman

03-27

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3

League Preview Series
by
Jordan Gorosh

03-27

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4

Prospectus Feature: How the Astros do Spring Training
by
Howard Megdal

03-27

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7

The Darkhorses: Steals and Saves
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-27

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3

Spring Training Notebook: Cactus League
by
BP Prospect Staff

03-26

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4

Daisy Cutter: Pedroia Got His Thumb Back, But Don't Call it a Comeback
by
Sahadev Sharma

03-26

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4

Expert League Auction Recap: Tout Wars: General Impressions
by
Mike Gianella

03-26

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3

Spring Training Notebook: Grapefruit League
by
Jeff Moore and Chris King

03-26

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9

Fantasy Auction Values: Third Edition, 2015
by
Mike Gianella

03-26

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7

The Quinton: Draft Setting and the Wisdom of our Competition
by
Jeff Quinton

03-26

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4

Fantasy Freestyle: Endgame Picks
by
Nick Shlain

03-26

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11

Player Profile: Jedd Gyorko
by
Keith Cromer

03-26

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2

Every Team's Moneyball: Baltimore Orioles: Unearth
by
Jeff Long

03-26

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33

Some Projection Left: Top 50 Draft Prospects [With Aiken Update]
by
Christopher Crawford

03-26

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Every Team's Moneyball: Miami Marlins: Haste
by
Brendan Gawlowski

03-26

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6

Transaction Analysis: It's Olivera Now, Baby Blue
by
R.J. Anderson

03-25

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8

Rumor Roundup: The Diamondbacks' Shortstop Decision Will Affect 2B, 3B, and Perhaps All Three OF Positions
by
Daniel Rathman

03-25

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7

Tout Wars X
by
Bret Sayre

03-25

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4

Painting the Black: Getting Personal
by
R.J. Anderson

03-25

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2

Every Team's Moneyball: Milwaukee Brewers: Nay Handedness!
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-25

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10

The Lineup Card: Eight Spring Training Lines of Interest
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-25

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8

Baseball Therapy: On the High Five
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-25

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14

The Darkhorses: ERA and WHIP
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-25

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0

Every Team's Moneyball: Cleveland Indians: Yay Handedness!
by
Nick Wheatley-Schaller

03-25

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7

Five to Watch: National League Position Battles
by
Wilson Karaman

03-25

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19

Moonshot: If We Can Land a Man on the Moon, Surely I Can Get Good Data
by
Robert Arthur

03-25

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10

Every Team's Moneyball: Seattle Mariners: Top of the (Free Agent) Market to You!
by
Russell A. Carleton

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A first look at the top 50 names to keep an eye on for this June's amateur draft.

To put it bluntly, this is not a very strong draft class, at least not on paper. The same problems that have plagued the last few classes—such as the lack of quality collegiate bats and depth up the middle—are here. But compounding the issues is that there isn’t the glut of prep pitching prospects that we’ve had in the previous editions of this decade, and there are a plethora of injury question marks here, particularly with the college arms.

With all of that being said, the barrel isn’t empty, and there is some upper-echelon talent to be found here, particularly in the southern part of the country. Despite the injury concerns college pitching—again—dominates the top of the class, and there are some prep bats here that have a chance to be all-stars if everything breaks right. Even the weakest class will give your team a chance to substantially improve its system, and 2015 isn’t an exception.

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How the Marlins aggressively promote prospects who have minimal minor-league experience.

Every day until Opening Day, Baseball Prospectus authors will preview two teams—one from the AL, one from the NL—identifying strategies those teams employ to gain an advantage. Today: how production comes from unexpected places for the Orioles and Marlins.

Week 1 previews: Giants | Royals | Dodgers | Rays | Padres | Astros | Rockies | Athletics | Yankees | Mets

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March 26, 2015 12:01 am

Transaction Analysis: It's Olivera Now, Baby Blue

6

R.J. Anderson

The Dodgers get the last big name on the free agent market, Cuban infielder Hector Olivera. Meanwhile, Brian Dozer gets certainty, while Jhoulys Chacin gets freedom, of a sort.

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Nick Ahmed might win the starting shortstop job, which had implications on the rest of the roster; while the Indians and Corey Kluber aren't even close on a contract extension.

Diamondbacks infield arrangement still in flux
A Monday morning report from Peter Gammons, which indicated that Nick Ahmed had gone from darkhorse to favorite in the battle to be the Diamondbacks’ Opening Day shortstop, set off a chain of speculation about the rest of the team’s infield plans. But hours later, first-year manager Chip Hale had a message for everyone eager to etch the club’s depth chart in stone: Hold your horses.


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March 25, 2015 10:00 am

Tout Wars X

7

Bret Sayre

Bret goes for it.

There are moments of calm that come before you sit down to participate in a draft or an auction, even when it’s a heightened environment, because you’ve almost always seen what is about to be thrown at you before. On Saturday, the environment was certainly heightened—as I was at Tout Wars, surrounded by a very well-versed and smart group of participants—but the calm was missing. After all, this wasn’t a standard draft or auction.

The concept behind Tout Wars X is that each year the format will change—testing out new twists and turns on the game that we all love. And in its inaugural season, that format was the monthly game made quite popular by Ron Shandler at his site, shandlerpark.com. So on this day, myself and nine other participants were snake drafting players at set salary cap values to use for the first four weeks of the season. So while the game was new, the stakes were much lower than the other auctions going on around us, simply because we were playing for one-sixth of the upcoming season. At the beginning of each subsequent month, we will all be selecting our teams using a basic salary cap system, just without the fun of the live draft.

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March 25, 2015 6:02 am

Painting the Black: Getting Personal

4

R.J. Anderson

Catchers, and the pitchers who love them.

It was a good week for personal catcher lobbyists. First, Dodger ace Clayton Kershaw experienced a rough virginal voyage with Yasmani Grandal, encouraging A.J. Ellis champions and arousing the kind of spring training beat writer-fan turmoil that's often reserved for lineup tweets. Then, a few days later, Blue Jay skipper John Gibbons insinuated he would leverage Russell Martin's defensive talents by pairing him with traditional pitchers, possibly leaving Josh Thole the chore of capturing R.A. Dickey's knuckleball. Again.

The concept of a personal catcher is nothing new, of course. Doug Mirabelli proved so important to Tim Wakefield's success that the Red Sox reacquired him in May 2006, not even five months after trading him to the Padres. Throughout the 1990s, Damon Berryhill, Eddie Perez, and Paul Bako became more famous than their talents merited thanks to Greg Maddux's insistence on having his own guy. Light-hitting Alex Trevino caught all Cy Young runner-up Mario Soto's 1983 starts, and would later serve as personal-catcher-cum-interpreter in the minors. J.C. Martin became Hoyt Wilhelm's right-hand man during the '60s, a relationship profiled in Mark Armour's Paths to Glory: "[On] the ninety-one occasions Wilhelm entered a game and Martin was not already catching, Martin entered with Wilhelm fifty-nine times. ... [On] the seventeen such occasions when Wilhelm came in with runners on base without Martin catching, Martin was brought in fourteen times." And so on.

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How the Brewers ignore handedness and buy all the right-handed players.

Every day until Opening Day, Baseball Prospectus authors will preview two teams—one from the AL, one from the NL—identifying strategies those teams employ to gain an advantage. Today: the handedness games of the Brewers and Indians.

Week 1 previews: Giants | Royals | Dodgers | Rays | Padres | Astros | Rockies | Athletics | Yankees | Mets

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The staff is intrigued by these players' Cactus and Grapefruit League performances to date.

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March 25, 2015 6:00 am

Baseball Therapy: On the High Five

8

Russell A. Carleton

Why teams touch.

Last week, ESPN’s Buster Olney wrote a rather curious column in which he asked a very simple question. Why do Major Leaguers high five each other so much? The issue came to light after the Milwaukee Brewers had to ban high fives for a little bit after an outbreak of pink eye in the clubhouse. (Makes sense, since pink eye is very transmissible.)

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March 25, 2015 6:00 am

The Darkhorses: ERA and WHIP

14

BP Fantasy Staff

The staff picks potential surprise leaders in these two categories.

Previous articles in this series:

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How Terry Francona has gained the platoon advantage in three different ways.

Every day until Opening Day, Baseball Prospectus authors will preview two teams—one from the AL, one from the NL—identifying strategies those teams employ to gain an advantage. Today: the handedness games of the Brewers and Indians.

Week 1 previews: Giants | Royals | Dodgers | Rays | Padres | Astros | Rockies | Athletics | Yankees | Mets

Read the full article...

A BP writer signs off.

Going back to Henry Chadwick’s invention of the box score in the 1850s, statistical summaries have been integral to telling stories about baseball. In the latter half of the 19th century, box scores were a way to explain the narrative of a game to an eager public without TV or photographs, in a time when the only access to sports was at the stadium. Now we are bombarded with a multitude of avenues with which to enjoy baseball, but the role of data is fundamentally the same.

To illustrate my point, consider the following scenario: Let’s say you come to me and ask how the game went yesterday because you didn’t get the chance to see it. I could say something like, “The Royals beat the A’s, 9-8.” It might be a factual statement, but it wouldn’t be an especially interesting one. A better way to tell the story would be to explain who played, who scored the runs, and when—the fundamental components of a box score. A still better summary of the game might highlight some of the unexpected happenings, like the way that the Royals exposed Jon Lester’s inability to stop the running game to the tune of seven steals. A yet more rich description of it might wrap the occurrences of the game up into historical narratives and longer-term trends, noting for example that despite nearly matching the single season record for innings caught (and presumably suffering under the burden of tremendous fatigue), Sal Perez was able to knock in the walkoff single in the bottom of the 12th inning. All of these details come from data, and help to transform the rote happenings of sport into a story worth listening to.

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