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07-25

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The Call-Up: Braden Shipley
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Christopher Crawford and Scooter Hotz

07-25

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The Call-Up: Alex Bregman
by
Christopher Crawford and Bret Sayre

07-25

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Players Prefer Presentation: Year 1 Of The Scott Servais Experiment
by
Meg Rowley

07-24

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BP Boston
by
Matthew Kory

07-24

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BP Milwaukee
by
Nicholas Zettel

07-24

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BP South Side
by
James Fegan

07-23

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Raising Aces: Warm It Up, Chris
by
Doug Thorburn

07-23

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BP Wrigleyville
by
Kazuto Yamazaki

07-23

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BP South Side
by
James Fegan

07-23

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BP Toronto
by
Nick Dika

07-23

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11

Prospectus Feature: Nine Things We Would Change About Major-League Baseball
by
Brendan Gawlowski

07-22

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BP Bronx
by
Ben Diamond

07-22

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Minor League Update: Games of Thursday, July 22nd
by
Wilson Karaman

07-22

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Fantasy Freestyle: Yasiel Puig's Missing Pop
by
Wilson Karaman

07-22

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What You Need to Know: Ambition Can Lead Only To Failure
by
Nicolas Stellini

07-22

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The Prospectus Hit List: Friday, July 22
by
Matthew Kory

07-22

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5

Free Agent Watch: Week 17
by
George Bissell and J.J. Jansons

07-22

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14

The GM Trade Game!
by
Sam Miller and BP Staff

07-22

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Weekly Wrap: July 22, 2016
by
Will Haines

07-22

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Prospectus Feature: DRA 2016: Challenging the Citadel of DIPS
by
Jonathan Judge

07-22

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The View From Behind The Backstop: This Is All Arbitrary, Isn't It?
by
Jeffrey Paternostro

07-22

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3

Fantasy Starting Pitcher Planner: Week 16
by
Greg Wellemeyer

07-22

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Prospectus Feature: Good Deal?
by
Trevor Strunk

07-21

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TTO Scoresheet Podcast: Episode 89
by
Ian Lefkowitz, Ben Murphy and Jared Weiss

07-21

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8

The Stash List: 16th Edition, 2016
by
J.J. Jansons

07-21

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BP Boston
by
Matt Collins

07-21

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4

Transaction Analysis: The Legend of Vogelbach, Now In Seattle
by
Christopher Crawford, Rian Watt and Brendan Gawlowski

07-21

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What You Need to Know: Seattle's Got A Neat Trick
by
Demetrius Bell

07-21

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Prospectus Feature: The Players Who Are Just Dying To Be Traded
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-21

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3

Potential Impact Call-Ups: Pitchers
by
J.P. Breen

07-21

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3

Eyewitness Accounts: July 21, 2016
by
BP Prospect Staff

07-21

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5

Some Projection Left: Prospect-For-Prospect Trades, Or Baseball's Fourth Wall
by
Christopher Crawford

07-21

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4

Rubbing Mud: Why the Yankees Should Sell Hard
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-21

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3

Minor League Update: Games of Wednesday, July 20th
by
Christopher Crawford

07-20

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BP Milwaukee
by
Seth Victor

07-20

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What You Need to Know: Fret No More
by
Daniel Rathman

07-20

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TDGX Transactions: Let's Talk About Yulieski Gurriel
by
George Bissell

07-20

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Team Chemistry: Fringe Effects on Called Strikes
by
John Choiniere

07-20

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3

Notes from the Field: Eastern League ASG, Eastern Division
by
Grant Jones and Adam McInturff

07-20

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2

Transaction Analysis: Where Does Yuliesky Gurriel Fit?
by
Bryan Grosnick

07-20

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The Quinton: Is There a Best Day (of the Week) to Trade?
by
Jeff Quinton

07-20

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5

Two-Strike Approach: How Good Is Cleveland?
by
Cat Garcia

07-20

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2

Life at the Margins: Seager See, Seager Do
by
Rian Watt

07-20

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5

Minor League Update: Games of Tuesday, July 19th
by
Mark Anderson

07-19

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What You Need to Know: J-Fer Effort
by
Emma Baccellieri

07-19

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BP Bronx
by
Kenny Ducey

07-19

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1

Cold Takes: Catches Up With You?
by
Patrick Dubuque

07-19

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5

Prospectus Feature: Twin Killing
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-19

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Notes from the Field: Eastern League ASG, Western Division
by
Grant Jones and Adam McInturff

07-19

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Notes from the Field: July 19, 2016
by
BP Prospect Staff

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July 25, 2016 6:00 am

The Call-Up: Braden Shipley

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Christopher Crawford and Scooter Hotz

Don't worry, Zack. I got this.

The Situation: Arizona made a smorgasbord of moves this winter to position themselves as contenders in the NL West. They currently sit two-plus touchdowns out of first place. With the team all but eliminated from playoff contention and Zack Greinke ailing, the Diamondbacks will call on the best prospect in the system, right-hander Braden Shipley.

Background: Shipley came to Nevada as a true two-way prospect, and was actually better with the bat early on, earning second-team All-WAC honors as a shortstop. That quickly changed, as Shipley transformed himself to one of the best right-handed starters west of the Mississippi, and earned top-10 consideration during his junior year. However, Shipley’s stock slid on draft day causing him to fall to the Diamondbacks with the 15th overall pick. Since then, he’s put up solid—if not spectacular—numbers, posting a career 3.79 ERA in just under 442 innings with a career strikeout-to-walk ratio of 2.70. As is so often the case, those numbers don’t truly tell the story of how talented Shipley is, and the DBacks have seen enough to believe he’s ready to get big-league hitters out.

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Monday is turning into a great day for prospect debuts, but this one is the most great.

The Situation: Houston is right in the thick of the playoff chase again, and with A.J. Reed struggling to get on base or hit for power upon his promotion, the Astros will instead call on the best prospect in their system, Alex Bregman.

Background: Bregman was a potential second-round selection coming into the 2012 draft out of Albuquerque, but it was clear that he was set on attending LSU, and attend LSU he did. He quickly established himself as one of the best players in college baseball, posting a .963 OPS in his freshman year and quickly became a legit candidate to be the top player taken in the 2015 draft. A so-so sophomore season saw his stock slide ever so slightly, but he hit .323/.412/.535 and was taken second overall by Houston that June. After an impressive first professional season, Bregman destroyed pitching this spring/summer, posting a 1.016 OPS, earning a trip to the Futures Game (where he nearly hit for the cycle), and becoming one of the best prospects in baseball.

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Scott Servais was hired with no managerial experience--but with a long front office resume, a close friendship with his GM, and a history of being chummy with analytics. How's it going?

“It’s gonna be much different than what you’ve seen in other camps. And there’s a reason—we’re trying to get a different result. I think if you wanna get a different result, you gotta do something different...You gotta be open to change. Change is uncomfortable. Just not used to it. But we’re talking about changing the culture, you gotta do something different.” —Scott Servais, January 28, 2016

When the Mariners hired Jerry Dipoto, and gave him authority to hire a new manager, he seemed keen to avoid the power struggles that had marked his time in Los Angeles and necessitated his eventual departure. In the days leading up to his resignation in July 2015, Ken Rosenthal reported that Dipoto and Mike Scioscia had clashed over the coaching staff’s over-reliance on “feel” and resistance to advanced analytics to prepare the Angels for matchups. In Seattle, Scott Servais offered something else—a career’s worth of collaboration, coupled with a willingness to try new things. In many ways, Servais looked the part of a major-league manager. He was a former catcher, and head of player development. He had an extensive coaching background even if he had never previously managed. Perhaps more importantly, he had an extensive background with Dipoto. Even before Los Angeles, they had overlapped several times. They were friends and colleagues of 15 years, and Dipoto had praised Servais’ willingness to listen to and try new things. Dipoto was the stathead, and Servais the player development guy, but they met in the middle.

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July 24, 2016 10:13 am

BP Boston

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Matthew Kory

The odds that Big Papi takes the hardware in his farewell tour.

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July 24, 2016 10:10 am

BP Milwaukee

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Nicholas Zettel

Team strength, before and after rebuilds.

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July 24, 2016 10:03 am

BP South Side

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James Fegan

If there's one thing you'll remember 50 years from now about the 2016 season, it'll probably be this.

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Notable pitching performances this week from Chris Archer, Chris Tillman and Mike Leake.

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July 23, 2016 6:00 am

BP Wrigleyville

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Kazuto Yamazaki

No, the record isn't 'most wins.' Still, a record pace!

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July 23, 2016 6:00 am

BP South Side

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James Fegan

Better now than on August 1st, though.

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July 23, 2016 6:00 am

BP Toronto

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Nick Dika

Digging into the wrong ways to think about the Blue Jays.

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It's a great game that could be better.

Yesterday, ESPN’s Buster Olney listed nine improvements he would like to implement in major-league baseball. Olney touched on a number of hot topics, including the length of games and the ever-present debate surrounding home field advantage in the World Series. His list incited various levels of support and opposition, but I’m assuming that Olney endeavored less to craft an op-ed than to start a conversation. To that end, it was extremely successful. Many pundits and fans crafted their own list in response, and you can count me among those so inspired. Below, you’ll find the nine things I would change about the game if I had Rob Manfred’s power and enough time to bring my vision to baseball.*

*As a baseball fan, my interests and loyalties lie more with creating a watchable product than maximizing profits. I fully recognize that the preceding caveat turns this exercise into theoretical and unrealistic wishcasting, but why stop now?

1. Remove convenience fees on ticket purchases: We’ll start with something fan-friendly and self-explanatory. Currently, any time you want to buy tickets in advance, you have to order them from a team’s website, or a third-party service like StubHub. The third parties have their own set of baggage, but the team sites are a headache too. The biggest issue is that they charge a “convenience” fee for processing, regardless of whether you print your tickets at home, pick them up at will call, or download them onto your phone. As any fan knows, there’s no convenience associated with paying an extra $3 per ticket, particularly since the surcharge is unavoidable; it’s just a tax on buying tickets. If I was the commissioner, I would ensure that any fan buying a ticket online would only be paying the advertised price.

2. Eliminate barriers to ticket exchanging/re-selling: This isn’t an issue for much of the league, but anyone following the Yankees-Ticketmaster snafu can probably feel which way the winds are blowing. To summarize a long story, the Yankees have made it very difficult for fans to get into the stadium without buying their tickets on Ticketmaster; purchasers are no longer allowed to print their own tickets, which limits everyone’s ability to buy seats from friends, scalpers, or on a website like Craigslist or StubHub. While important looking people in suits will dress these decisions in fancy rhetoric laden with ridiculous phrases like “safer ticketing experience,” the reality is that these policies make it more difficult for fans to attend games affordably. It’s always unseemly when a multi-billion dollar industry squeezes every last cent out of its paying customers, and as commish I would put the kibosh on the practice before it spreads throughout the league. You should be allowed to download your tickets, sell them to friends or fellow Craigslisters, and pay less than face value for tickets to a game with thousands of available seats. Criminy.

3. Remove metal detectors from stadiums: There’s no evidence that metal detectors make attending a baseball game any safer. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence, however, that the long lines outside of metal detectors can make you late for first pitch. There’s also no history of people bringing weapons to ballgames with the intent to cause mayhem, and even if an enterprising terrorist saw fit to do so, the metal detector wouldn’t necessarily impede his plan; instead of bringing a weapon into the stadium, he could instead wreak havoc outside the gates, where he'd find scores of immobile fans helplessly stuck in line while they waited to march through a metal detector. Ultimately, metal detectors are security theater, and if we’re going to trade freedoms for enhanced security, the security should actually be enhanced, damn it.

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July 22, 2016 11:54 am

BP Bronx

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Ben Diamond

How bad can things get for Alex Rodriguez before the Yankees say enough is enough?

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