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April 26, 2013

Overthinking It

This Week in Catcher Framing, 4/26

by Ben Lindbergh

Last July, Sam Miller administered a blind BABIP test, providing nine GIFs of batted-ball outs and nine GIFs of hits but cutting them off just before the point at which contact was made. The purpose was to test whether we could tell which would be which, based on all the visual information we had about the pitch prior to the point of contact. We failed with flying colors.

So this is a catcher framing version of that. Below you'll find 10 pairs of GIFs. One pitch on each row is a called strike, and the other is a ball, but I've cut them off before the umpire starts to signal either way. All of the pitches are from this past Wednesday, and all of them are on 0-0 counts.

Record your guesses and leave them in the comments section, or email me by clicking the email button below, or send me a tweet @ben_lindbergh. You can just list your responses ("The strikes are on the 1. Left 2. Right 3. Left", etc.), or you can include explanations of why you guessed the way you did. I'm interested either way. I'll tally up the responses and report back next time. Maybe I'll do it again at the end of the season to see if we've gotten any better at predicting strikes after watching catchers frame pitches for the next few months.

You'll find all the usual "This Week in Catcher Framing" features below the test. You might want to let your browser load for a while, so that the GIFs don't destroy it.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

***

League Leaders

The Best (min. 30 OZoneStrikes+ZoneBalls)

Ratio

Catcher

OZoneStrikes

ZoneBalls

Ratio

Jonathan Lucroy

108

49

2.20

Carlos Corporan

37

17

2.18

Hank Conger

24

12

2.00

Evan Gattis

58

37

1.57

Yadier Molina

97

69

1.41

Francisco Cervelli

73

54

1.35

Jose Lobaton

41

32

1.28

Wilson Ramos

27

22

1.23

Erik Kratz

67

55

1.22

Jose Molina

58

54

1.07

 

Runs

Catcher

OZoneStrikes

ZoneBalls

Runs

Jonathan Lucroy

108

49

7.7

Yadier Molina

97

69

3.6

Evan Gattis

58

37

2.7

Carlos Corporan

37

17

2.6

Francisco Cervelli

73

54

2.5

Hank Conger

24

12

1.6

Erik Kratz

67

55

1.6

Jose Lobaton

41

32

1.2

Wilson Ramos

27

22

0.7

Jose Molina

58

54

0.5

  • If it's possible to be a dominant pitch framer, Lucroy is doing it.
     
  • Remember the terrible defensive problems Conger had in spring training? Since the regular season started, he hasn't committed a throwing error, he's caught one of two attempted basestealers, and he's done a fine job of framing. No catcher will ever replace Jeff Mathis in Mike Scioscia's heart, but Conger must at least be winning a grudging regard.
     
  • I spoke to Cervelli yesterday about his apparent improvement behind the plate—prior to this season, he'd been a below-average framer. More on that next week.

The Worst (min. 30 OZoneStrikes+ZoneBalls)

Ratio

Catcher

OZoneStrikes

ZoneBalls

Ratio

Ryan Doumit

8

24

0.33

Jesus Montero

29

80

0.36

Nick Hundley

45

110

0.41

Chris Iannetta

40

92

0.43

Gerald Laird

21

47

0.45

Rob Brantly

44

94

0.47

Miguel Olivo

17

35

0.49

Matt Wieters

61

121

0.50

Kelly Shoppach

21

41

0.51

A.J. Pierzynski

40

78

0.51

Runs

Catcher

OZoneStrikes

ZoneBalls

Runs

Nick Hundley

45

110

-8.5

Matt Wieters

61

121

-7.8

Chris Iannetta

40

92

-6.8

Jesus Montero

29

80

-6.6

Rob Brantly

44

94

-6.5

A.J. Pierzynski

40

78

-4.9

John Buck

47

84

-4.8

Wilin Rosario

41

74

-4.3

Gerald Laird

21

47

-3.4

T-10 John Jaso

34

59

-3.3

T-10 A.J. Ellis

50

75

-3.3

 
  • Last week, I said it was strange that Matt Wieters, Yorvit Torrealba, and Ryan Hanigan were on the list of the bottom 10 backstops. Now only Wieters remains, but he holds a prominent place.

This Week in Molina, 4/18-4/24

Weekly Net Strikes: -5
Weekly Net Runs: -0.65
Weekly Playing Time: 5 G, 5 GS, 46.0 innings
Yearly Playing Time: 17 G, 13 GS, 118.3 innings
Yearly Net Strikes: 4
Yearly Net Runs: 0.5

It was a net negative week for Molina, but he's still above even on the season. And his best frames of the week were still pretty sexy: 

3. Date: 4/24
Batter: Francisco Cervelli
Pitcher: Alex Cobb
Umpire: Sam Holbrook
Count: 2-2
Pitch type: 92-mph four-seam fastball 
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.195 feet


Cervelli wins the week's best batter reaction:

He also said some very complimentary things about the Molinas to me, which I'll relay next week as well.

2. Date: 4/24
Batter: Robinson Cano
Pitcher: Alex Cobb
Umpire: Sam Holbrook
Count: 0-0
Pitch type: 79-mph curveball
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.223 feet

1. Date: 4/21
Batter: Josh Reddick
Pitcher: Roberto Hernandez
Umpire: Jeff Nelson
Count: 2-2
Pitch type: 93-mph sinker 
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.279 feet


And Reddick is the runner-up for this week's best batter reaction:

One nice thing about watching a bunch of called strikes every week is that you start to recognize umpire punchouts. Jeff Nelson's is one of the best. It's pretty much a prelude to the People's Elbow.

We have Lucroy's framing valued at 117.6 runs over the past three seasons (in 23,439 pitches) and Molina's at 115.4 runs (in 13,759 pitches). That makes Molina the reigning pitch-per-pitch champion, but because Lucroy has been so great this season, I'm adding him to the weekly update rotation. Welcome to "This Week in Lucroy."

This Week in Lucroy, 4/18-4/24

Weekly Net Strikes: 3
Weekly Net Runs: 0.39
Weekly Playing Time: 6 G, 6 GS, 30.0 innings
Yearly Playing Time: 18 G, 16 GS, 54.0 innings
Yearly Net Strikes: 59
Yearly Net Runs: 7.7

3. Date: 4/23
Batter: Will Venable
Pitcher: Jim Henderson
Umpire: Gary Darling
Count: 2-0
Pitch type: 93-mph four-seam fastball 
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.288 feet


2. Date: 4/23
Batter: Will Venable
Pitcher: Yovani Gallardo
Umpire: Gary Darling
Count: 0-0
Pitch type: 79-mph curveball 
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.355 feet

This is a low pitch, and Lucroy gets even lower to receive it by going down to one knee. That helps explain his uncanny ability to get low strikes.

3. Date: 4/24
Batter: Chase Headley
Pitcher: Marco Estrada
Umpire: Paul Emmel
Count: 1-1
Pitch type: 89-mph four-seam fastball
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.453 feet

This seems like a solid reception, but it also looks like a pretty nice pitch, and maybe not as far from the zone as PITCHf/x says. On to the best and worst frames of the week among all catchers:

Best Frames of the Week

5. Date: 4/23
Catcher: Yadier Molina
Batter: Jayson Werth
Pitcher: Adam Wainwright
Umpire: Cory Blaser
Count: 0-0
Pitch type: 92-mph sinker
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.384 feet

Textbook.

4. Date: 4/21
Catcher: Chris Stewart
Batter: Maicer Izturis
Pitcher: Ivan Nova
Umpire: Tim Timmons
Count: 0-1
Pitch type: 95-mph two-seam fastball
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.396 feet

Stewart has been buried behind Cervelli in the early going, but New York's pitching staff is in good hands no matter which one is catching.

3. Date: 4/24
Catcher: Jason Castro
Batter: Endy Chavez
Pitcher: Bud Norris
Umpire: Tom Hallion
Count: 0-0
Pitch type: 89-mph four-seam fastball 
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.448 feet

Carlos Corporan has been the better Astros framer so far this season, but Castro's technique looks okay here.

2. Date: 4/24
Catcher: Jonathan Lucroy
Batter: Chase Headley
Pitcher: Marco Estrada     
Umpire: Paul Emmel
Count: 1-1
Pitch type: 89-mph four-seam fastball
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.453 feet

This is the Lucroy frame of the week we saw earlier.

1. Date: 4/21
Catcher: Yan Gomes
Batter: Marwin Gonzalez
Pitcher: Joe Smith
Umpire: Dan Bellino
Count: 1-0
Pitch type: 90-mph sinker
Distance from Strike Zone: 0.544 feet

This is a low delivery, but the call may have had as much to do with Gonzalez's extreme crouch (which made the ball look higher relative to his strike zone) as it did Gomes' glove.

Worst Frames of the Week

5. Date: 4/22
Catcher: Carlos Santana
Batter: Jeff Keppinger
Pitcher: Justin Masterson
Umpire: Jeff Kellogg
Count: 1-0
Pitch type: 92-mph sinker
Distance from Center: 0.466 feet

Masterson misses his spot by a bit here, but Santana's reception is still too stabby.

4. Date: 4/20
Catcher: Chris Iannetta
Batter: Alex Avila
Pitcher: Michael Roth
Umpire: Paul Emmel
Count: 0-1
Pitch type: 91-mph sinker 
Distance from Center: 0.423 feet

Sliding after the catch isn't a great way to get calls. This pitch looks slightly outside, and maybe it was, but imagine what it might have looked like if Iannetta had stayed still.

3. Date: 4/23
Catcher: Gerald Laird
Batter: Michael Cuddyer
Pitcher: Cory Gearrin
Umpire: Wally Bell
Count: 0-1
Pitch type: 87-mph sinker
Distance from Center: 0.374 feet

Can only kind of see the plate, but that pitch looks like it crossed the corner.

2. Date: 4/19
Catcher: Nick Hundley
Batter: Hunter Pence
Pitcher: Edinson Volquez
Umpire: James Hoye
Count: 1-0
Pitch type: 93-mph four-seam fastball 
Distance from Center: 0.557 feet

Maybe more of a Volquez error than a Hundley mistake, though Hundley didn't do anything to minimize the amount by which the pitch appeared to miss. Volquez had his first career start of at least seven innings without a walk on Wednesday, with Hundley catching, but it doesn't seem as if his catcher got him any extra strikes in that outing:

1. Date: 4/22
Catcher: Jose Lobaton
Batter: Brett Gardner
Pitcher: Matt Moore
Umpire: Andy Fletcher
Count: 1-0
Pitch type: 93-mph four-seam fastball
Distance from Center: 0.335 feet

The new, aggressive Brett Gardner didn't swing, but that looks like a strike. Could be that Lobaton's collapsing knees during the delivery distract the ump. Could be it was just a bad call.

Thanks to Ryan Lind for research assistance.

Ben Lindbergh is an author of Baseball Prospectus. 
Click here to see Ben's other articles. You can contact Ben by clicking here

57 comments have been left for this article. (Click to hide comments)

BP Comment Quick Links

aaron229

Be interesting to see a Molina v. Molina breakdown of similarities ect.

Apr 26, 2013 06:38 AM
rating: 0
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

Good idea.

Apr 26, 2013 06:40 AM
 
CJNC1963

In looking at the Laird .gif it doesn't look like he has done anything wrong and that the umpire just missed the call.

Apr 26, 2013 06:48 AM
rating: 2
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

That has certainly been known to happen.

Apr 26, 2013 08:21 AM
 
alwaxman

Anyone paying attention to this series can guess the answers to your quiz.

You have changed the way I watch baseball games. I now spend my time evaluating the catcher instead of what the pitcher or hitter is doing. I'm not sure that I even care what the score of the game is anymore. Thanks for nothing.

Apr 26, 2013 06:57 AM
rating: 8
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

It's harder than you think! And yes, I know the feeling.

Apr 26, 2013 08:21 AM
 
alwaxman

LLLRRLLLRR

If I do well then you get the credit, this series has done a great job explaining the markers to look for. Doug Thorburn has done the same excellent job explaining pitching posture. It would be great if BP could have similar series on hitting and fielding posture.

Apr 26, 2013 09:01 AM
rating: 0
 
gtgator

Question on Laird (who was allegedly signed due to defense), but is there a breakdown on his stats for just Teheran? As he is Teheran's personal catcher and since Teheran is a rookie (and many umps seem less inclined to give rookies much leeway on balls/strikes), I'm curious if that is having any effect on his poor showing here. Or he may just be a bad framer. Thanks either way.

Apr 26, 2013 07:11 AM
rating: 0
 
CJNC1963

I also think being the personal catcher for Teheran has negatively affected him. Umpires are notorious for not giving close pitches to rookies.

Apr 26, 2013 07:51 AM
rating: 0
 
dougcox

It's not just Tehran. Hudson and Medlen have had ther worst starts with Laird. Hudson 9 runs in 9 IP with Laird, Medlen 5 ER in 11 IP.
Basically their ERAs are 2.5x with Laird than Gattis so far.

Apr 26, 2013 07:57 AM
rating: 0
 
CJNC1963

I think it would be foolish to say that poor starts by Hudson and Medlen were caused because they were pitching to Laird rather than Gattis.

However, that being said, I think Gattis is much better defensively than what we were told by scouts. He seems to have a great arm, blocks pitches in the dirt, and does well at framing. I don't think Laird is a super great defensive catcher but he isn't horrible either.

Apr 26, 2013 08:15 AM
rating: 0
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

I don't think it can explain the kind of discrepancies in starters result that you're talking about (that's probably partly a blip), but Laird has consistently rated as one of the worst pitch framers. So that's not a small sample/bad luck thing.

Apr 26, 2013 08:20 AM
 
CJNC1963

That's good to know. Laird was supposedly signed as a good defensive back-up catcher but that certainly doesn't appear to be the case. In his last game Roger McDowell called the pitches from the bench for Teheran and Teheran was lights out all game.

Apr 26, 2013 09:14 AM
rating: 0
 
goiter6

RRRRLLRLLR

Apr 26, 2013 07:22 AM
rating: 0
 
dougcox

Laird has been horrible defensively. In addition to pitch framing, he's allowed 7 wild pitches playing 1.5 games a week. Gattis has allowed 1. No reason to start him over Gattis.

Apr 26, 2013 07:37 AM
rating: 0
 
gtgator

Other than the need to rest Gattis, I agree. But he was sold to Braves' fans as being good defensively. As he came from the AL, I'm just curious is this was a false bill of goods or he's been a little unlucky to date.

Apr 26, 2013 07:42 AM
rating: 0
 
Dave Holgado

LRRLRRLLRR

Apr 26, 2013 07:48 AM
rating: 0
 
tlpacker

Sorry if I missed this before, but have you looked at how a pitcher missing their spots affects the results? A lot of the bad frames seem to be when the pitcher surprises the catcher a bit (even in the zone) and the catcher is unable to disguise this. Of course, that has something to do with catcher skill, but not completely. Is there a way to separate this?

Apr 26, 2013 07:53 AM
rating: 0
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

There isn't an easy way to separate it, no. But it definitely does affect the results. Catchers have told me that it's more difficult to frame pitches when they can't count on the pitcher hitting his target (which is pretty intuitive). Max Marchi has a method that controls for the pitcher, but it's very computationally intensive and can't be run as often as I would need it to be in order to use it for these articles. (Even he doesn't use it anymore, because he felt the extra processing time wasn't worth the benefit.) And even then, it wouldn't really correct for where the target was and how much a pitcher missed his spot by on a pitch-by-pitch basis.

The only public work I know of on looking into how much missing the target impacts the probability of getting a strike on a borderline pitch was done by Max for the fourth PITCHf/x summit, when he was granted access to some of Sportvision's COMMANDf/x data (the tech that tracks the position of the catcher's glove). He looked at borderline pitches (which he defined as those with a 40-60% probability of being called a strike), and then he calculated the distance between the target and where the pitch ended up. The average distance from strikes was 0.85 feet, and the average distance for balls was 1.04 feet. So there is some trend toward pitches that hit the target being called strikes, but unfortunately, we don't have access to all of that data.

Apr 26, 2013 08:39 AM
 
Schere

LRRRLRRLRR

Looks like Dave Holgado and I think similarly. Some of these pairs are so different (like 4LR & 5LR), I'm going to have a hard time ascribing the outcome to the catcher, whatever the outcome.

Apr 26, 2013 08:18 AM
rating: 0
 
jojokamish

LRRRRLLLRL

Was the ump in 6. so jumpy because Jerry Lane had already left the game with a broken finger?

Apr 26, 2013 08:30 AM
rating: 0
 
huztlers

That pitch from Estrada to Headley is pretty definitive proof that PitchFX is not a reliable tool. Thank goodness that machines don't call balls and strikes.

Apr 26, 2013 08:35 AM
rating: 0
 
aschauer

1. left -- right was tailing
2. right -- really tough call b/c it's kind of a sloppy snag back into the zone and the other catcher doesn't have any glove carry.
3. right -- the pitch is just closer to the zone. Also very Molina-esque snag
4. left -- another Molina snag
5. right -- Molina snag
6. right -- pitch's in the same spot but receiver's glove is more over the plate
7. left -- catcher's glove moves to much, just like Hundley example above
8. left -- not as noticeable as 7 but still more glove movement
9. left -- right catcher's glove falls out of the zone
10. right -- Molina snag

P.S. I know it's not proper terminology but whenever I watch Yadi or Jose behind the dish they're doing the "Molina snag," sorry I can't think of a better way to describe it but yall know what i'm talking about

Apr 26, 2013 08:46 AM
rating: 0
 
KevenC

LRRLLLRLRR

Apr 26, 2013 09:01 AM
rating: 0
 
SC

LLRRRLRLRR

Apr 26, 2013 09:27 AM
rating: 0
 
Mooser

RRRLLLRLRL

Apr 26, 2013 09:41 AM
rating: 0
 
Brock Dahlke

I keep reading these articles about framing and all that comes to mind is that wouldn't it be much easier to frame and gain strikes for a pitching staff with good command? I mean if you call for an inside fastball but it ends up 4 inches off the outside, there is no way you can frame it regardless of how well you frame. Were if you are catching a staff with good command that hits your glove time after time, you would have a lot more opportunities to gain some strikes.

Apr 26, 2013 10:40 AM
rating: 0
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

See my comment above in response to tlpacker.

Apr 26, 2013 10:42 AM
 
R.A.Wagman

LLRLRRLLRR

Apr 26, 2013 10:40 AM
rating: 0
 
mblthd

All of those GIF's look like strikes to me. I just hope Wolfman finds the answers he's looking for re: Helton Guys.

Apr 26, 2013 11:10 AM
rating: 1
 
BP staff member Larry Granillo
BP staff

Can I join in?

LRRRLLLLLR

Apr 26, 2013 11:15 AM
 
bhalpern

LLLLRLRLRR

Apr 26, 2013 11:21 AM
rating: 0
 
smocon

Ugh, pitch framing. I know this is the new darling stat for Stat geeks, but its just not a reliable method to project value onto a catcher. Unless you are inside of the head of the umpire, who makes a judgement call on a subjective basis on an objective strike zone.

You would need to create an "umpire" factor to somehow quantify this subjective call, much like park factors. At least with park factors, the wall distance doesnt change from day to day. An umpires strike zone may.

Add to it that you are trying to add value to something in which a subjective judgement call was made in error. Just toooooooo noisy of a data set to make any sort of conclusion. There is also the part where a catcher can get penalized simply because he is catching a pitcher with bad command/control....its a lot like the old CERA stat that was tried.

Jonathan Lucroy is good at framing pitches, but he is a below average catcher. His arm isnt very good, and his footwork behind home plate is sub par. This is why Catcher defense is so difficult to address because a big part of what goes into the position defensively is his ability to move smoothly to get pitches, get into position to make throws and catch, calling a game, etc.

There isnt a catcher in the world that was drafted or developed because of his pitch framing ability.

Apr 26, 2013 11:24 AM
rating: 0
 
mblthd

But does Lucroy possess the will to catch strikes?

Apr 26, 2013 11:39 AM
rating: 3
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

I'd disagree with a good deal of that. The simple method I'm using for these weekly pieces doesn't adjust for umpire tendencies, but the more complex models developed by Mike Fast and Max Marchi, among others, account for that and other factors (pitch type, count, batter/pitcher, etc.). When you adjust for those things, the results actually aren't all that variable. Framing performance has a high correlation from year to year--it's a skill, not just noise.

And I'm not sure how you reach the conclusion in your last sentence--receiving skills are widely considered an important part of a catcher's skill set. Lucroy doesn't have a great arm, but it's not awful. Even if it were, his ability to get extra strikes would more than make up for it.

Apr 26, 2013 11:40 AM
 
evo34

How does a subpar catcher throw out 26% of runners for his career? That's right around MLB average. Only 8 guys have attempted to run on him this season, so it seems like teams are reading a different scouting report than you are.

P.S. I would agree with you that pitch-framing analysis is becoming a bit overexposed. Not sure we need weekly columns on it.

Apr 29, 2013 00:10 AM
rating: 0
 
kflavin11

LRRRLLLLLR jeez that's exactly what Larry said, now my first ever comment on this site looks like a ripoff of a staff writer. How does that even happen?

So I'll attempt to justify. A couple of these - notable #2 & #3 - show the catchers (White Sox & Dodgers in those two) dropping the mitt to the ground and then pulling it up to the ball. The mitt seems to be traveling a long way to the ball.

In #2 the Padres' catcher drops the mitt but the ball lands low, so he isn't required to move the glove more than a couple of inches.

Since I attempted to find a pattern and haven't gone back to read the older articles in the series yet (I will!), I would assume my reasoning is illogical, unsound, or just misses the boat.

Apr 26, 2013 11:40 AM
rating: 1
 
pobothecat

RLRRLLLRRR

Apr 26, 2013 11:55 AM
rating: 0
 
penski
(286)

Strike on the...
1. L
2. R the most difficult choice of the ten
3. L
4. R glove movement on L seems too obvious
5. R nice knee drop technique
6. L more still
7. L another knee drop
8. L the R is too stabby
9. R too much glove movement on L
10. L glove moves, but whole catcher moves on R

Apr 26, 2013 12:54 PM
rating: 0
 
howlingmoon

L,R,R,L,R,L,L,L,L,L

Apr 26, 2013 14:26 PM
rating: 0
 
PQuadrino

L,R,L,R,R,L,R,L,R,L

Apr 26, 2013 15:02 PM
rating: 0
 
ostdiek1

L, L, L, R, R, L, L, R, L, R

Apr 26, 2013 15:58 PM
rating: 0
 
BTPBaseball

LLLRLRLLRL

Apr 26, 2013 18:50 PM
rating: 0
 
cdt719

LRRLRLRLLL

Apr 26, 2013 23:53 PM
rating: 0
 
Tomrphk

1. Left…. The right one shows a head drop
2. Left… Again the catcher shows movement in the head.’
3. Left … Again same head bob…. Is it bad I am watching the catcher and not where the pitch goes?
4. Right….this has been the toughest one. The left has the head bob down but makes a very clean grab. The right the catcher almost lets the pitch keep carrying his glove upward. I almost feel I am going right just because I had 3 lefts in a row.
5. Right…. I don’t like how the catcher stabs at the ball but the left pic shows my hated headbob.
6. Left… these are two of the better ones but the late grab and dip on the right pushes me to pick Left who just stays really stable through out.
7. Left…. Even though it looks like Perdo Hernedez is catching :) He stays very stable except for dropping his left knee at the end. On the other hand the right looks like he is reaching back, flipping the glove, just blah!
8. Left…the right has too much stab while the left looks very very stable body even with the slight head dip.
9. Another tough one…. The left has the glove move up and then go back down… the right has the glove just track and frame nicely but there is the head bob. I’m going to go LEFT because the right frame even the umps head seams to dip at the end
10. Right…. The left the glove moves up and away after the catch the right it moves back down just a little

Apr 27, 2013 04:29 AM
rating: 0
 
JOARGE9481

1. Left. The San Diego catcher does a terrible job and pulls the down and away with his frame.

2. Right. Although I like both frame jobs. Not much movement by either.

3. Right. Dodger catcher does a bad job with the old college style of framing.

4. Left. Cervelli is an excellent receiver now and frames really well.

5. Left. D-back catcher is very lazy with this pitch, collapsing his throw hand leg. Too much movement.

6. Left. Nice job by Ross here. The A's catcher has far too much body movement and actually leans forward from the waist on this pitch.

7. Right. Both catchers look awkward here. Not really a good job by either.

8. Left

9. Right.

10. Left.

Apr 27, 2013 08:57 AM
rating: 0
 
JOARGE9481

Ben, I think the best frames are those where the catcher beats the ball to the location as opposed to reacting and/or stabbing at the ball. In a way that is not at all unlike a good outfielder getting to a spot on a fly ball; the catchers who are good at receiving appear to exhibit a similar approach. Your thoughts?

Apr 27, 2013 09:12 AM
rating: 0
 
BP staff member Ben Lindbergh
BP staff

Definitely. It helps to be able to anticipate where the ball is going to be, so it's easier to frame pitches for guys with good command and pitchers whom catchers are very familiar with.

Apr 27, 2013 09:30 AM
 
msbirt

1. Left
2. Right
3. Right
4. Left
5. Right
6. Right
7. Left
8. Left
9. Left
10. Right

Apr 27, 2013 09:36 AM
rating: 0
 
BillJohnson

LRRRLRLLRR

with the proviso that I may be wrong on every last one of these, although I have been following this series faithfully, and learning from it (or so I thought).

One suggestion for what has become one of my favorite BP series this year. Any chance of setting these up with pushable radar buttons poll-style? I've found it hard to keep consistency between what I was saying to myself as I saw the GIFs and what I wrote in the reply at the end of the article. This is such an excellent feature that making it easy to use, and therefore getting it used by a wider cross section of readers, would make it not just excellent but a valuable tool.

Apr 28, 2013 06:15 AM
rating: 0
 
DickTiger

1.Right
2.Left
3.Right
4.Right
5.Left
6.Left
7.Left
8.Left
9.Right
10.Left

Definitely overthinking most of these picks.

Apr 28, 2013 09:28 AM
rating: 0
 
Nathan Aderhold

1. Left
2. Right
3. Right
4. Right
5. Left
6. Left
7. Right
8. Left
9. Right
10. Right

Apr 28, 2013 09:49 AM
rating: 0
 
bgiles

Strikes are
1. L
2. L
3. R
4. R
5. R
6. L
7. L
8. L
9. R
10. L

Apr 28, 2013 20:47 PM
rating: 0
 
JanFortyTwo

I'd say the strike calls are
LLLRRLRLRR

Apr 29, 2013 04:44 AM
rating: 0
 
LorenA19

LLRRLLLLLL

Apr 29, 2013 05:26 AM
rating: 0
 
dstamand

LLRLRLLLLR

Apr 29, 2013 15:55 PM
rating: 0
 
jdmurphy

LLLRLLLLRR

Apr 30, 2013 07:02 AM
rating: 0
 
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